#1
I have decided that when I join a band I want to be rhythm guitar, but I need help. What do I need to know to become a rhythm guitarist?
Last edited by justin19954 at Mar 23, 2009,
#2
that really depands on what genre do you want to play.
rock= basic power/regular chords (inc' 7th/9th chords), and i guess some basic theory.
metal= youll need good alternate picking ability, know your power chords well and i guess some harmonizing abilty.
but the more you know the better...
#6
Quote by Khann
How to play rhythm guitar? Or atleast spell it?


Sorry about that, I feel like an idiot
#7
Quote by justin19954
Well I want to join a Grateful Dead/ Beatles type band, if that helps.

then you need to know much theory

Quote by Khann
How to play rhythm guitar? Or atleast spell it?

needles to say anything
Last edited by szekelymihai at Mar 23, 2009,
#8
Quote by szekelymihai
then you need to know much theory


If I want to learn theory, do I need to know how to read music?
#9
Quote by justin19954
If I want to learn theory, do I need to know how to read music?



Yes, plus u should learn that anyway.
You shouldnt limit yourself with a 'what do I need to know' question, just always try and learn new things so you can be the best player youre able to be.
#10
Quote by justin19954
If I want to learn theory, do I need to know how to read music?


Put it this way. Do you need to know spanish to make a taco?

I can't read music, fluently, but I know the difference between my minors/majors. Learn your extensions and how to make them; 7 and 9 maybe 11 and 13; know your 4ths and your 6ths, which when you get right down to it are not that hard. You'll be playing the chords that make you look like you know what you are doing, itll sound good, and it makes for a good rhythm guitarist.
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Last edited by metalisbest at Mar 23, 2009,
#11
Quote by SilverchairFan
Yes, plus u should learn that anyway.
You shouldnt limit yourself with a 'what do I need to know' question, just always try and learn new things so you can be the best player youre able to be.


Alright I guess i'm gonna call my local music shop and start taking music classes. Thanks everyone who answered!!
#12
2 main things you'll need are...

1. A metronome. I can't stress how important this is to a rhythm guitarist.

2. Music theory. Having a large vocabulary of chords, coming up with multiple parts, using scales and arpeggios to make riffs, copying something you just did on other parts of the neck. Music theory will help you do all this.
#13
Quote by metalisbest
Put it this way. Do you need to know spanish to make a taco?


No?
#14
I hate that term. Rhythm Guitarist always makes me think of someone playing an archtop alongside a jazz band. Or worse, someone who can't hack playing solos. But I suppose that's what you get from trying to describe subtleties in a language designed for telling your mates where the best coconuts are.
/rant
In modern terms you'll need to be both fast and rock steady at chord changes. You are the link between the bass/drums and the show-offs oh sorry, lead guitar and singer. You've also got to be the counterpoint to some of the things the other guitarist is doing. And cover for him when he breaks a string/gets drunk/falls off stage etc.
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#15
You need to know how to play guitar, learn some songs you like, figure out the theory behind them and your off.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#16
learn to make catchy riffs that are easy for others to solo over
be willing to let others take the fame
learn to sing in key while you play, you are often background vocals.
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#18
Reading music is just communication, and not directly theory related.

In fact in different languages these things sometimes differ, and they also differ between instruments.

for example; a sax has music written down differently, and so does a guitar and piano, and bass goes on a different clef as well.

You need to know ur chord names and how to play em though. If u play rhythm, then almost always can you get chord sheets for music.

Learn rhythms, check out what drummers do with accents and learn how to play chord in different ways.

For example ska chords are played mostly with the top strings, and in Jazz often the 5th and/or root are left out of the chords.

Learn the stylistic rhythmic and chord traits from genre's and you will do fine.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 23, 2009,
#19
reading music is an advantage. but i never read anything while i`m playing. just memorize everything i heard, make some "practices", play it alone two-three time. than ask my band to play it!
but it will be an advantage if u can read music. i learn many songs from downloaded guitarpro music sheets.
#20
Quote by metalisbest
Put it this way. Do you need to know spanish to make a taco?


No, but you should know how to read sheet music if you are trying to be a musician.
#21
Quote by blueriver
No, but you should know how to read sheet music if you are trying to be a musician.



I disagree, you need to know how to read sheet music if you want to communicate with other musicians.

Or if ur a performer in a classical/jazz setting.

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#22
Do you think it's possible to just learn music theory from a shop? Thats all i'm really intrested in.
#23
Quote by justin19954
Do you think it's possible to just learn music theory from a shop? Thats all i'm really intrested in.


Just try the crusade columns here on UG. They're great.
#24
everything everyone has said. but also work on your strumming patterns. a lot of my friends can solo pretty well, but they cant play rhythm for ****. you need to stay on beat and mess around with how you strum it. whether its down strokes only, or both. play around with some basic chords with diff strumming patterns and speeds
#25
Quote by xxdarrenxx
I disagree, you need to know how to read sheet music if you want to communicate with other musicians.

Or if ur a performer in a classical/jazz setting.


While I agree with that statement of course, I have never met a musician that hasn't tried to communicate ideas before.
#26
I communicate with my freinds all the time and don't use sheet music, I just yell out ideas during a jam and they know what's going on. Such as arrpegiate a G, or work around the 5.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#27
Quote by blueriver
While I agree with that statement of course, I have never met a musician that hasn't tried to communicate ideas before.


But I know chord names and intervals. Someone says for instance Cm7#5 I know how to play it.

If I need to know a melody, just play it and I use my ear.

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#28
Quote by justin19954
Do you think it's possible to just learn music theory from a shop? Thats all i'm really intrested in.


Yes, but make sure its an experienced guitarist who knows the theory behind the guitar rather than just being able to spit out licks all day. I've found that a good portion of guitar teachers at guitar shops are just all show and no brains. This isn't the case all of the time but it is a good portion of the time.

So I would look for a private guitar teacher personally, I tend to trust people with their degree in classical or whatever you are looking to learn than some guy at a guitar store.
#29
Quote by Lurcher
I hate that term. Rhythm Guitarist always makes me think of someone playing an archtop alongside a jazz band.


Hm, weird I always imagine Izzy Stradlin.
No means maybe
#30
You should get "Rhythm Guitar, the Complete Guide". It's written by some instructor at GIT. The book is very thorough, (as the title might suggest). It covers chords, progressions, and just about any rhythm situation you might encounter.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#31
Quote by justin19954
Do you think it's possible to just learn music theory from a shop? Thats all i'm really intrested in.


it depends on the teacher. a lot of guitar teachers at shops just teach how to play the guitar and maybe some licks and such. or their knowledge of music theory may be basic, or might have learned things wrong. feel him out.


but you can learn plenty from the lessons and articles here.

start here: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

just take your time and practice everything you learn. try to apply it, maybe try writing a riff or lick or progression using things that you learn, make sure you understand it.