#1
Me and my band are recording in about 2 weeks.

Our producer told us, to practice with a metronome.

To play with dynamics.

To make sure not to strum insanely hard.

To make sure the technique is well played

To Change the strings a week before recording

To change the drum heads too

For our singer to keep hydrated

To avoid using the pedalboard in the recording as the effects at the mixing stage are cleaner and more versatil on the overall tone.

So far, we have made sure to practice all of our songs to a metronome during every rehearsal, and we can do it now. However, I am wondering what else I should keep in mind.

I have also been thinking of getting an Evidence Audio Lyric HG cable, however I wonder if it will make a noticeable difference in the recording to justify its insane price. I heard raving reviews on it.

Also in our songs we do a lot of pickup switching live. Am I supposed to do that recording as well?


Please help me out. I want the recording to be as good as possible
#2
actually me and my band are lookin into gettin studio time

im a strong believer in sounding the same live as you do in the studio so yeah i think you should do the pickupswitching
Frontbassman sucks in the nicest way possible

Kevin and Kelsey 12-03-2007

#3
Basically do exactly what he has said.

Except I disagree with him on the topic of post-effects. If you have great pedals (delays, verbs, wah etc.) tell him to **** himself and use them in line. Whilst you can get a good overall sound out of post effects I've found they come out sounding incredibly digital and they also take a lot more mixing time, thus costing you more money.

If you have **** pedals, ignore the last paragraph.

If you're tracking live, you will have to do your pick-up switching live. If you're layering you can just separate all the parts by what pickup combo your using and track them separately.

Don't buy a cable, the studio should have all your cable and connection needs.

Aside from that, I suggest you create a sound map of what you want to achieve i.e. just list the dynamics you want applied to various parts/songs and give this list to your producer. The more concise you are with him about the desired result the happier you'll be with the sound.

AND finally...

**** all of this technical bull**** and have fun
This water's dark and coldGod's not where you hopedThis moment come and goneIt's time we all moved on
#4
Both of you are very helpful

As for the pedals I use a bunch of Electro Harmonix. If I were to use my pedals, the ones I use on the songs im gonna record are

Electro Harmonix Stereo Electric Mistress
Electro Harmonix Big Muff USA
Electro Harmonix Small Stone
Electro Harmonix Holy Grail plus
ISP Decimator
Tc Nova Delay

I never use more than three of those at once, with the decimator being one of the three I use all the time to minimise noise.

Are those pedals, good enough for recording? They are all true bypass and stuff.

As for the cables then. Is that then a No No? I hear great things about the evidence audio cables. Right now I have livewire on my pedal board. I wonder if the upgrade will make a difference.
#5
That pedal set up will do fine in a studio environment. You won't need the decimator, they should have a rack gate of some description to get rid of the noise.

I'd say at the very least take your pedals with you and get the engineer to use the aux sends/returns (same as the fx send/return on an amp but in the mixer) to hook them up (if possible). That way you can very easily a/b the tones and decide on what sounds best to everyone. Recording is a highly scientific guessing game, you can never know what will happen, thus experimenting can only result in good things .

As far as cables go, they serve only as an electrical signal bus, thus as long as the cable has no breaks, kinks, or frayed wires (internally) they will serve their purpose. A $20 cable and a $200 cable will be exactly the same, provided that they have been taken care of correctly. This is all irrelevant noting that the studio will have all the cables you need, all of which should have been taken care of very well.
This water's dark and coldGod's not where you hopedThis moment come and goneIt's time we all moved on
#6
^That's not strictly true about the cables.


But anyway, I think axemanchris has a good list on his website about how to prepare for recording. I can't remember what it's called though... although most studio websites have a good list of stuff to help you prepare.

I'd also suggest you leave your ego at the door.
There is poetry in despair.
#7
Quote by fridge_raider
^That's not strictly true about the cables.


But anyway, I think axemanchris has a good list on his website about how to prepare for recording. I can't remember what it's called though... although most studio websites have a good list of stuff to help you prepare.

I'd also suggest you leave your ego at the door.


I agree with the ego stuff. We all have our egos, hehe, but I want this to sound good so badly, I want to let everyone do their job. I like to keep the ego to myself, as I know it only hurts the outcome of the overall outcome.

If anyone knows anything else I should keep in mind please let me know.
#8
The thing about changing the strings a week beforehand is too long IMO, you'll be playing a lot that week I'm sure, and those strings will be dead.

Leave it more than just overnight, perhaps 2 days? Then they'll definitely have settled, but will still have life in them.

Also, make sure your guitar is properly intonated, or it'll sound sucky.

Also, use less gain to record than you usually would when recording.
#9
I had my studio time a couple of months ago and heres what i can tell you. My drummer couldnt play to a click track (excellent live drummer though) and if this happens you play to the click and take the drums out of the mix so he'll follow your lead. Take a magazine or something because you will be BORED when you other bandmates are tracking. Don't hesitate to throw out ALOT of ideas, it may take longer to track but its better to have one great song than 3 sub-par songs. Oh and also dont piss your producer off. I hated ours (a friend of our vocalist) he would change the songs I wrote and add instruments (who's ever heard of ragtime piano in power metal?) and he desecrated my tone with alot of post effects. All i can say really is try to have a good time, and i hope this experience doesn't leave a bad taste in your mouth like it did mine.