#1
Ok, so i have some questions about the major and minor pentatonic scales so here they are :

1. Where would I need to put this shape -

e|-|-O-|---|---|-o-|---|
B|-|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|
G|-|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|
D|-|-o-|---|-O-|---|---|
A|-|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|
E|-|-O-|---|---|-o-|---|

on the fretboard to make it an

A. C Major Pentatonic Scale
and
B. C Minor Pentatonic Scale

and secondly

2. Can you use a keys alternate minor and solo over the major
Example - use A minor pentatonic to solo in the C major scale of a over a chord progression in the key of C


Any help with these would be greatly appreciated
#3
1. I think you need to learn some basic theory. There are some pretty good articles on UG you can read that should answer your questions here.

2. You can play the notes of A minor pentatonic over a progression in C major, but you won't actually be playing in A minor. Again, you should read some of the theory articles.
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#4
on the thick E string, whichever note your first finger is for the first note on that string in scale for a minor pent scale, for example if your your first finger is on the 5 fret, the note A, you would be in the scale of Am, and if your pinky was on the A instead of your first finger, you'd be in the key of A major.
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for some reason this post makes me suspect theres something horribly wrong with you.

not that thats a bad thing...

...dont kill me.
#5

e|-|-[B]O[/B]-|---|---|-o-|---|
B|-|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|
G|-|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|
D|-|-o-|---|-[B]O[/B]-|---|---|
A|-|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|
E|-|-[B]O[/B]-|---|---|-o-|---|
     ↑
    8th Fret = C Minor Pentatonic Scale (note: Root notes are bold)


e|-|-o-|---|---|-[B]O[/B]-|---|
B|-|-o-|---|---|-o-|---|
G|-|-[B]O[/B]-|---|-o-|---|---|
D|-|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|
A|-|-o-|---|-o-|---|---|
E|-|-o-|---|---|-[B]O[/B]-|---|
     ↑
    5th Fret = C Major Pentatonic (note: Root notes are in bold)


2. Can you use a keys alternate relative minor and solo over the major
Example - use A minor pentatonic to solo in the C major scale of a over a chord progression in the key of C
^fixed

Kind of but not really. Am is relative to C major. They share the same notes and so the same box shapes but you would play them differently and they would sound different. (Same box shape - Different root notes different intervals different note choice different phrasing)

For example if you look at the two shapes in code above and took the first shape with it's root notes and slid it back three frets it would be Am. It would overlay the second shape but the root notes would be in different places and that is important when playing.

Hope this helps.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 24, 2009,
#6
Quote by Morbidyeti
on the thick E string, whichever note your first finger is for the first note on that string in scale for a minor pent scale, for example if your your first finger is on the 5 fret, the note A, you would be in the scale of Am, and if your pinky was on the A instead of your first finger, you'd be in the key of A major.

Wrong.
That was major fail.

A major scale is played by starting at the base note (A note for A major scale) Advance as followed:
W-W-H-W-W-W-H
A-B-C#-D-E-F#-G#-repeat

A minor scale is Starting at the base note (Aminor for example)
And going
W-H-W-W-H-W-W
A-B-C-D-E-F-G

AN A MINOR SCALE IS THE SAME THING AS YOUR CMAJOR SCALE, BUT STARTING AT THE A NOTE.
#7
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
Wrong.
That was major fail.

A major scale is played by starting at the base note (A note for A major scale) Advance as followed:
W-W-H-W-W-W-H
A-B-C#-D-E-F#-G#-repeat

A minor scale is Starting at the base note (Aminor for example)
And going
W-H-W-W-H-W-W
A-B-C-D-E-F-G

AN A MINOR SCALE IS THE SAME THING AS YOUR CMAJOR SCALE, BUT STARTING AT THE A NOTE.


He wasn't wrong. That minor pentatonic shape is also one of the five pentatonic shapes you can play on the fretboard that make up the major pentatonic. Learning to construct scales is fine, but maybe learn them on the guitar before telling people they are wrong?
#8
I know all my scales. If you start with your pinky on the A note, you would not be playing the a major scale? you would be playing something else.
#9
You would be playing the Major pentatonic. Which is what he was trying to say.
#10
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
Wrong.
That was major fail.

A major scale is played by starting at the base note (A note for A major scale) Advance as followed:
W-W-H-W-W-W-H
A-B-C#-D-E-F#-G#-repeat

A minor scale is Starting at the base note (Aminor for example)
And going
W-H-W-W-H-W-W
A-B-C-D-E-F-G

AN A MINOR SCALE IS THE SAME THING AS YOUR CMAJOR SCALE, BUT STARTING AT THE A NOTE.


This is also wrong, or at least very misleading.
The note you start on is completely irrelevant, as is the order in which you play the notes. A minor is not the same as C major, and is in fact completely different, with the only similarity being that they share the same notes. Each of those notes functions completely differently.
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#11
I was just giving the outline. I never said any order of note playing. I was showing the basic scale as if you were to play it in order. You can use that for any key. And if you play the c major scale, but start on the a minor note, and end an an a note, you have just played the a minor sclae.
I know my music theory enough too know what I am talking about.

A minor Scale
|-5---------|-a---------|
|-5-6---8---|-e-f---g---|
|-5---7-----|-c---d-----|
|-5---7---9-|-g---a---b-|
|-5---7-8---|-d---e-f---|
|-5---7-8---|-a---b-c---|

C major scale
|-7-8------|-b-c-----|
|---8---10-|---g---a-|
|-7---9-10-|-d---e-f-|
|-7---9-10-|-a---b-c-|
|-7-8---10-|-e-f---g-|
|---8---10-|---c---d-|

A minor scale, played in c major position
|-7-8---10-12-13---15---17|-b-c---d-e-f---g---a-|
|---8---10----------------|---g---a-------------|
|-7---9-10----------------|-d---e-f-------------|
|-7---9-10----------------|-a---b-c-------------|
|-------------------------|---------------------|
|-------------------------|---------------------|
#12
And if you play the c major scale, but start on the a minor note, and end an an a note, you have just played the a minor sclae.


But that is only true if the harmony suggests A minor. Explaining it the way you did is just going to give the TS the impression that scales are box shapes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
Scales are a collection of intervals, the notes don't actually matter. It is a complete coincidense that C major and A minor have the same notes. They have some of the same intervals, but what makes it minor is a flat third, sixth and seventh scale degree. Think in notes, but understand in intervals.
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#14
Quote by Archeo Avis
But that is only true if the harmony suggests A minor.

What if there is no harmony?
It would appear that you are suggesting one can not play a minor melody without a harmonic backing establishing the minor tonality?
That is also misleading.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 29, 2009,
#15
Quote by 20Tigers
What if there is no harmony?
It would appear that you are suggesting one can not play a minor melody without a harmonic backing establishing the minor tonality?
That is also misleading.


There is harmony. The TS said so.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.