#1
Check it out:

www.myspace.com/thelotteryband

We used a Firewire 410 (2 inputs), a mixer that buzzed, and a cheap version of pro tools to record our whole album. If anyone has any questions, we have a few tricks we figured out, and i'd be happy to share them.
Quote by gangsta4life
Oh i did that and I crapped out of my urethra. Its really not that big of a deal.


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#4
dude.. i went to high school with Ryan marchand.

tell him renn says hi!

and good on you for the recording quality despite equipment hurdles.. I do it all the time, Ask ryan about the voodoo mic.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
Last edited by Kivarenn82 at Mar 24, 2009,
#6
Wow thats amazing.. seriously.

Such a great result from so little. I'm guess ou didn't record as a whole band though that woulda been kinda impossible

Also, the guitar playing is amazin. So inventive with so many great modal ideas. I wish i was that creative and fluent with my scales!!
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#7
deffinately let us know the "tricks" you figured out. i'd love to hear a story on how you recorded everything. it sounds excellent. nice work.
#8
Sounds good. Upload some on here though, my dog could record something that sounds pro on myspace with his arse.

What mic's? Rooms?
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Last edited by willieturnip at Mar 24, 2009,
#9
Ryan is a great guy. He speaks highly of his friends in Canada! So, I can walk you guys through everything if you like. We have two rooms: A bigger one, in which all the equipment is set up, a jam room if you will, and a smaller room in which we have a computer and a mixer set up. First, we got drum sounds, which took the longest I think. We miked everything up, using borrowed mics, and ran it into the mixer through a hole in the wall. We used a Firewire 410, with only two inputs. We ran two mic cables from the left and right outs of the mixer into the Firewire 410. This is where the "getting good sounds from sh*t equipment" starts. Our drummer, Jake, tuned each drum to his liking, and then tested each drum. One thing that can help during this process, and something that I recommend doing, is listening to one of your favorite recordings, and try to get your drums to sound relatively close. The whole thing probably took us two days. We tried different many different mics. After being completely sure that everything sounded good on its own, and in relation to eachother, we were finished with drums. Next was guitars and bass. A thing that I think is really important, is to remember that live amp settings and amp settings for a record are usually drastically different. Ryan has a Marshall half stack, not sure which model. I could check. Just about all of our guitar tracks were recorded with an SM 58 and that amp. Another thing we did to make the rhythm tracks sound good was to record an acoustic track, and then a marshall track. The acoustic track really adds a lot. Bass sound wasn't that hard. Something we did to make sure that the bass sound was good, was to compare it and the kick drum in a recording. You should be able to hear both of them clearly. After we had good sounds, we did many, many test recordings until we were happy. Then we set about writing the album. Having everything written and finalized makes recording sooo much easier. So, over the next few weeks, we put together the pieces and ideas we had, until we had something semi polished. Then, we recorded drums. We set a click track for each song, and had Jake do probably 5 takes of everything. Then when we edited, we took the best of all the takes. We did that with every instrument. With guitar and bass, we did about the same thing. A bunch of different takes, and ideas, and put together the best. We did everything but leads, misc stuff, and vocals. We call these "beds", because everything goes on top of them. After we had all of the "beds", we put together all of our lyrical ideas, and recorded all of the vocals with a condenser mic in the room with the computer and the mixer. Next, both Ryan and I did leads, we had a female singer we know come in, and a percussionist came in. Everything was just about done at this point. Then came mixing. Making sure everything sounded good in relation to each other, and adding effects, fades, and different panning configurations. We also mastered it ourselves, using some rack compressors and limiters we borrowed, in addition to the compressors, limiters, and normalizers that came with my cheap version of Pro Tools M-Powered. Basically, my tips for good recordings are (in no particular order):

1. Spend a lot of time getting good sounds. Be anal about it. Listen to your favorite recordings, figure out what you like about how the instruments sound, and try to get close to it.

2. Know what you're recording. Have everything pretty much final. We spent a few weeks writing everything. And be honest. If you can't play a part near perfectly, maybe someone else in the band can. A recording should be the best representation of your song, if that's what you're going for.

3. Experiment. We tried acoustic tracks with electric tracks, a low volume track of the drums with reverb in addition to the regular drum track, etc. You don't know what something will sound like until you give it a shot. Be open minded. And listen to A LOT of recordings. Figure out what you want yours to sound like, and what experiments you might have to conduct to find that sound.

4. Have fun with it. We were laughing the whole time. Get rid of your egos, and make good music. If you're getting frustrated with recording, take a break, and go for it the next day.

Also, miscellaneous tips like comparing recordings, listening for the kick drum and bass guitar relationship, and something else we did was to turn the master volume WAY down, and see if we could still hear everything. If you can hear every individual instrument at a low volume, you're doing something right. If anyone has any specific questions about gear or anything else, or something I missed, I would be happy to answer.
Quote by gangsta4life
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#10
So basically, there were no tricks involved. You just recorded in a sensible, logical fashion and didn't rush it.

I'm definitely against emulating other peoples sounds too..
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#11
Listening to someone else's cd can be very useful when mastering, for volume, etc. And I'm not for directly emulating someone's sound, just for getting close to a professional sound, with priority to what you think sounds good. A lot of the tricks involved are Pro Tools specific, mic placement, etc. I was hoping for specific questions on that. EQ tricks, stuff like that. I can't really write all of the little tips and tricks directly from memory, forgive me.
Quote by gangsta4life
Oh i did that and I crapped out of my urethra. Its really not that big of a deal.


Member of the 'Guitarists Born In 1991' Club. PM greendayguitar or blues_rocker to join.
#12
Impressive. Your methodology, though laborious, is really all necessary stuff if one wants to make a really high quality recording. You have to be anal, and you have to be a perfectionist, and you have to be willing to try a bunch of things before committing to something.

What kind of mics and what mixer?

There is something not quite "professional" about your recording, but it's close enough that the differences are vague and hard to put a finger on. Cumulatively, though, they add up to 'close.'

You know, when you hear something recorded through a high end signal chain, it just has a depth to it? Even just a single vocal... it just has a depth, and a resonance, and size to it. You only get that with higher end mics and higher end pres. That's not a criticism of you. I can't achieve it on my gear either. You've certainly done the best you could with what you have.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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#13
Quote by Mastodon
Listening to someone else's cd can be very useful when mastering, for volume, etc. And I'm not for directly emulating someone's sound, just for getting close to a professional sound, with priority to what you think sounds good. A lot of the tricks involved are Pro Tools specific, mic placement, etc. I was hoping for specific questions on that. EQ tricks, stuff like that. I can't really write all of the little tips and tricks directly from memory, forgive me.


To be honest, I can't hear anything specific to comment on with myspace quality.

Quote by axemanchris

You know, when you hear something recorded through a high end signal chain, it just has a depth to it? Even just a single vocal... it just has a depth, and a resonance, and size to it. You only get that with higher end mics and higher end pres. That's not a criticism of you. I can't achieve it on my gear either. You've certainly done the best you could with what you have.

CT


Agreed, it just sounds 'nicer'. I hate that word, it's so non descriptive, but it just is. There's no real specific anything thats better. Everything is just a bit..nicer .
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#14
Quote by Mastodon
Check it out:

www.myspace.com/thelotteryband

We used a Firewire 410 (2 inputs), a mixer that buzzed, and a cheap version of pro tools to record our whole album. If anyone has any questions, we have a few tricks we figured out, and i'd be happy to share them.


Wow dude, this sounds -really- professional! I'm more into .VST software. I'll have to try live recording when I get to that point lol.
-Tommy S.
#15
I'll upload some of the stuff onto UG
Quote by gangsta4life
Oh i did that and I crapped out of my urethra. Its really not that big of a deal.


Member of the 'Guitarists Born In 1991' Club. PM greendayguitar or blues_rocker to join.
#16
Ok, check out http://artists.ultimate-guitar.com/thelotteryband/. Thanks for all the kind words everyone. I'll post again about mixers and mics.
Quote by gangsta4life
Oh i did that and I crapped out of my urethra. Its really not that big of a deal.


Member of the 'Guitarists Born In 1991' Club. PM greendayguitar or blues_rocker to join.
Last edited by Mastodon at Mar 26, 2009,
#17
Cheers mate. I can hear what's going on now!

Sounds good. Not professional, I think thats a bit far, but it does sound ace.

How did you mic the kit and with what mics? How did you get the levels right on the mixer when you were in the same room?
Epiphone Elitist SG (Serious)
Tokai Silver Star
Epiphone Dot
Epiphone Les Paul
Washburn J28SCEDL
Washburn J12S

G.A.S List

JCM600 (Yes a 600..)