#1
I need examples of techniques of playing that came from blues playing and now are standard in rock music, such as sliding or bending. Also a song as an example for this technique would be really nice.
Thanks!
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Thanks alot. When i read the first sentence, i dont know why, but i laughed in the middle of my first class at tech school. You sir have made me look like a fool for the first and last time
#2
Listen to Rory Gallagher. Blues guitarist but known for taking blues to the 'next level' This may help
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#3
Could you name some of the techniques he uses? I don't know that many of them by name.
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This is Germany we're talking about.


Germany


Quote by stoner179
Thanks alot. When i read the first sentence, i dont know why, but i laughed in the middle of my first class at tech school. You sir have made me look like a fool for the first and last time
#4
The 12 bar blues format appears in lots of rock songs (I-IV-I-I-IV-IV-I-I-V-IV-I-I). Also the blues scale (pentantonic plus a #4) is used in rock to add flavor. Obvious bands to look for examples are aerosmith and led zeppelin, both very blues based rock bands.
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#5
Quote by LReiter
Could you name some of the techniques he uses? I don't know that many of them by name.


Are you thinking of 'fancy' words like legato, arpeggio, etc?

I don't think we're going to be able to provide you with anything like that because blues doesn't use a lot of "techniques". Blues is all about phrasing, not pyrotechnics on the guitar. It's not a complex genre in terms of theory at all (although anybody who says its easy to play WELL is an idiot).
Suhr Custom, Flaxwood Rautia or Grosh Tele thru
HBE Medicine Bawl Wah
Analogman BiComp
Texas Two Step OD
Fulltone Ultimate Octave/Fuzz
Boss CE-2
TC Nova Delay
SLO-100, 65 London or Bogner Shiva
Ask me about any of this stuff!
#6
I don't think many techniques really originated with the blues, though certain ones are usually thought of as "bluesy". Double and triple stops, use of b5 and M6 in the minor pentatonic scale (not really a technique, however), I IV V progressions (again, not a technique)...

Listen to Chuck Berry's "Johnny B. Goode" for lots of double stops (two notes at once in a melody/lead):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEq62iQo0eU
#7
Quote by LReiter
I need examples of techniques of playing that came from blues playing and now are standard in rock music, such as sliding or bending. Also a song as an example for this technique would be really nice.
Thanks!

there aren't really any techniques that "came" from blues, but if you're looking for things that are common to both blues and rock then the answer is everything, rock and roll evolved directly from the blues.
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