#1
ive been practicing my vibrato but no matter how long i practice i dont seem to get any better. help?
#2
you most likely havent played very long...

vibrato comes with time, and use. make sure you include it in almost everything. Practicing it by itself is kind of stupid.

just watch videos of people with great vibrato technique over and over and emulate them.
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#4
I disagree, nvranka. I do think its good to practie it on its own. Just like bends, hammer ons etc. And ive also been looking for a good tutorial on how to develop good vibrato.

The problem is that many people are good at something but not good at explaining it properly. Ive watched a few youtube videos and yes it has helped a bit, but ive yet to see someone really explain it in depth.

I know that there are different ways to do it but i dont believe for a moment that its sufficient just to say "practise, and it'll come to you".

There is a basic method that applies to most ways of playing vibrato (of course there is), and i too would like to know more about it. It neednt be the mystery that it seems to have been made out to be. Like many things, its certainly a knack, but one does need a starting point.

Id really like to see someone doing it slowly and explaining every last detail of what theyre doing, instead of leaving me with unanswered questions. Then, when i know every aspect of the basics, i can develop my own style, based on those basic principles. And like i say a lot of guitarists just dont have what it takes to explain stuff.
Last edited by leafarmusic at Mar 24, 2009,
#5
Quote by nvranka
you most likely havent played very long...

vibrato comes with time, and use. make sure you include it in almost everything. Practicing it by itself is kind of stupid.

just watch videos of people with great vibrato technique over and over and emulate them.



No! Without practicing vibrato you will never match it to the skill level of the techniques you DO practice! Vibrato is what makes your playing your own; playing a C major scale at a moderate tempo sounds similar by all players, but your vibrato is what sets you apart. You can shred at a million miles and hour and land on a choice note, but if you don't know how to play a good vibrato on that note, you're playing will still sound armature because you have little control over that portion of your technique, which shows the guitar is controlling YOUR expression, and not the other way around.

Many great guitarist practice vibrato on it's own, with a metronome, vibrating at various speeds and depths. John Pertucci and Steve Vai, among countless others, practice like that, and I can say from personal experience that even though I loved vibrato, and always wanted to play it nice and wide and flowing like you hear the masters do, I never developed a decent vibrato until I began to practice it all on it's own.
#6
Quote by leafarmusic
And like i say a lot of guitarists just dont have what it takes to explain stuff.


Ain't that the truth.

For something so simple, vibrato is actually the toughest technique to properly explain or teach, and it's deceptively tough to master.

There are a million different ways to do it too.
From your standard pulling the string downwards or upwards slightly and releasing.
Sliding back and forth between the fret markers.
Pressing the string down hard into the fretboard.
Rocking your finger in place.
Both pulling down and pushing up.
Pulling down and pushing up in a circular motion.

The last two are a little more exotic and really tough to make sound good though.

If you want your vibrato to sound like your favorite player, my suggestion is to watch some of their videos and try to get a handle on what method they're actually using.

Practicing whatever method you choose is a lot simpler than you can imagine. Yet few people actually bother doing it. All you need is a metronome. Pull and release in quarter notes, 8th notes, and triplets. You need to make absolutely sure that you're hitting the same spot on the peak of your vibrato, and returning dead to the original note.

Start slow, and make sure you practice both wide and shallow vibrato.

But seriously the metronome is all that stands inbetween a wild off pitch vibrato, and Steve Vai's Vibrato
#7
Interesting. Is there any way to slow down youtube or google videos? I understand about using a metronome etc, but im curious about the actual movement itself. So yes, id like to watch a few guitarists do it, if theres a way to slow a video down.
#9
There was a post on this not too long ago. But rather than just telling you to use the search bar...

One of the most important tools needed to develop vibrato, is your ear. What I did was listen to guys whose vibrato I wanted to emulate, namely David Gilmour, Michael Schenker, Neal Schon, and Steve Lukather. Then when I practiced, I tried to make my notes sing like theirs did. Your goal should be to keep your vibrato nice and smooth, like a singers voice. The way I was taught to practice it is this, bend the note up. As soon as you feel your finger touch the string above, bend it back down. When you feel the string below, go back up. So you're bending in a very small "zone". If you go too far either way, your note will go out of pitch. It takes a lot of practice and control to develop a good vibrato. But it's worth the time.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#10
To add to icronic's post, in addition to varying timing, vary the width of the vibrato. Apart from that, try and follow the following pointers -

In time, in context, and in control.

Sometimes a really wild vibrato sounds great. Sometimes a really subtle one. Sometimes none at all. Pay attention, listen and learn.

I'd do a vid on vibrato but mine is embarassing atm. Off to practice and no more UG for the day, methinks.
#11
One thing I found incredibly helpful was working on vibrato'ing in rhythm, like specifically doing 8th or 16th notes with the vibrato. As your control improves, there comes a point where you just "get" it.

The other thing I'd suggest is working on each finger individually - that gives you a lot more freedom than trying to engineer the fingering to land on the finger that's best at vibrato.

I also work on my transitions out of the vibrato. For example, you land on a note, vibrato for 2 1/2 beats, then off into a fast 16th note run. I work on keeping the vibrato going as long as I can, right up to the beginning of the fast run. I've got a bit of a tendency I'm trying to correct where I'll stop the vibrato a 1/2 beat or so early in anticipation of the run.