#1
how much are the parts and is it difficult to understand how to build (I'm 14... but i took a basic electricity class :P )
#2
build effects before an amp. i'm buying a head, then gonna build a cab. if you go this route, 6505 for metal or a bugera 6262 for adaptability. but alot of places have schematics for amps, try google? maybe beavisaudio.com
#3
It's not very difficult. But getting ALL the right parts is hard. It took me for friggen ever to get every single correct capacitor.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

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Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
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#5
Quote by blandguitar
that^ reminds me

smallbearelec.com for parts.



I would definitely do this. I did it at radioshack.

Check and check again your part numbers and make sure you have the right ones. It sucks to burn out an LED light with the wrong value capacitor or have it not work because of one.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#6
Depends on what kind of amp you want to build. If you want to build a small Solid State amp to learn a little more about electricity: maybe $20 or less.

If you want to build some awesome tube high-gain monster, then easily $1500.

There is another thread floating around (It was right above yours when I posted here) that has some info in it.
#8
Build a noisy cricket or something similar first. They have layouts which are easy to understand, they don't have lethal voltages parading around anywhere in the circuit, they are fun to play with, they are cheap, they teach you how to troubleshoot to an extent and they help with your soldering.

Effects pedals are also good. They are simple and useful once built.

I suggest learning to translate a schematic onto Vero or Perf board too. It makes it much easier to troubleshoot and follow schematics in the long run.

Breadboarding will be helpful too if you plan on knowing how capacitors and resistors in the signal chain affect the tone.

Modding a valve junior is also a good thing. Much easier than building from scratch, and cheaper than buying all the parts separately (including chassis, cable, cabinet etc.e tc.) You can always build another small amp and stick it in the chassis.

As for difficulty, actually understanding how a tube amp works is vital, and depends on the person, but can be quite hard to learn. The voltages are lethal, the chances that there will be no problems first go are nearly zero, biasing is important, etc. etc.

And they are also a money pit. Once you're into it, you're pretty much committed to it. It's also addictive.
#9
Being 14 unless you parents are willing to give you the cash for such projects your gonna want a cheaper hobby. Even a small 5 watt amp is gonna be 250$ in parts. And basic electric class wont help. I have a friend whos a licensed electrician and doesnt understand a thing I talk about when it comes to the inner workings of a tube amp. So start on something simpler like stomp boxes where you can learn about how the stuff works. Runoffgroove.com has many designs using transistors based on tube circuits that would give you an understanding before you dive into the much more lethal voltages of tubes.
#10
I really don't understand why everyone seems to think its so difficult to understand why exactly a tube amp works the way that it does. A tube amp is always a viable first project if you are willing to do research for it, although a high gain tube amp is not usually recommended. I'm almost positive that not many people who have even built a tube amp on this website can explain exactly why everything works the way it does in a tube amp.

If you are easily able to find parts then small bear is not the place to look for parts. Mouser or some other large electronic parts distributor will get you the same parts for much less.

Speaking of tube amps, even if you do not decide to build one first, here are a few links that will help you understand how the amps work.
http://www.freewebs.com/valvewizard/
www.ax84.com - check the forums or the theory document
http://www.aikenamps.com/ - the tech info section is good

there are also quite a number of places to get schematic
http://www.schematicheaven.com/
http://www.drtube.com/guitamp.htm
http://www.blueguitar.org/schems.htm

And if you are looking for kits then here are some other links
www.tedweber.com
www.brownnote.net
www.ceriatone.com
www.ax84.com
http://www.mojomusicalsupply.com/
http://www.trinityamps.com/
http://metroamp.com/

As people have said there are lethal voltages in tube amps, but if you know where they are and how to work with these voltages then you will be fine. You shouldn't fear electricity, but do respect it because if your stupid it can kill you very fast.