#1
well ive been playing for almost a year now.
alot of people tell me that my skill is almost unbelievable when they find out how long ive been playing. even my teacher was impressed.
But i want to be a good songwriter more than anything. and i know theory is a good way to get there.

im going to use this for now
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

i just want some tips from people on anything and maybe links to help me learn fast.

just a little info: my favorite type of music is neo-classical and my biggest inspiration and influence is jason becker( im sure some of you know him) and i want to be able to write songs like serrana. i know it will take awhile but i am gunna try hard to learn theory. no matter how boring it is lol
Classical Guitarist
#2
that's not a bad page to start learning off of. one thing i wish someone would've told me a long time ago was to learn how to use the theory IN my playing. i learned it. i still know a lot bc i am a music ed major in college. no one ever told me to start using it. when you learn a skill, listen to music and try to pick that skill out in familiar songs. try writing your own stuff using that skill. knowledge is great but, if you don't know what to do with it then it is just a bunch of extra useless info in your brain
#3
one word: jazz. jazz teaches so much about modes, chord progs, improv, and soloing in general. im sure becker had at least some jazz backround. the thing is, songs like serrana are based on soloing over fairly simple chord progressions, and the arpeggio part is playing the chord prog as swept arpeggios, so developing a becker-like style probably won't require intense theory (some will help, tho) just a terrific sense of melody and technique. the compositional ability should come naturally from that.

also, i find it kind of annoying bragging how good people say you are. but, believe me, you aren't the only one who's done it
Quote by AA00P
Listen to the man, he's Jewish.
#4
Theory boring?!?! That is practically blasphemy! Heres a good tip and something to try that really got my interest into Theory way back in the day. Learn to write out scales, then build up chords on the notes of the scale and learn to determine what each chord is. Find a proper progression and record urself playing it. Find out what changes in the scale needs to be made for playong over each chord. Play the recording slowly and play the scales overtop of it. Start just playing the scales then add little flares like vibrato, pauses, bends (not on the ror note unless ur bending to the next note in the scale) ext. ull get better and better.

EDIT: after readin this I remember how tough it was to start this.
Quote by Gunpowder
C'mon, man. We're just kidding. We all know that drummers are important.

After all, without drummers, who would bag my groceries?


(\__/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Put him in your signature and help
(")_(") him on his way to world domination.
Last edited by kingofdudes161 at Mar 25, 2009,
#5
Well learn the notes on the fretboard if you are JUST starting out.
Since you are learning neo-classical it might be helpful to learn to read notes too, but you don't have to.

Try these books, I carry them everywhere:
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Hal-Leonard-Scale-Chord-Relationships-Book-CD-940478-i1160790.gc
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Centerstream-Monster-Scales-and-Modes-Book-100033843-i1156576.gc

You might also want some form of a chord book.
No means maybe
#6
thanks people. i will make sure to check out some of this stuff. i have always been kind of interested in jazz.

oh yeah one question :

i do want to memorize the notes on the fretboard so i can solo in key.
but i just want to sit down one day and just use the chromatic scale to memorize the notes.
is that a good or bad thing?
i mean just a whole day of sitting down and playing the e-string from the 1st fret all the way to 12 constantly. and so on.
Classical Guitarist
#7
Quote by Zep_shizzle
thanks people. i will make sure to check out some of this stuff. i have always been kind of interested in jazz.

oh yeah one question :

i do want to memorize the notes on the fretboard so i can solo in key.
but i just want to sit down one day and just use the chromatic scale to memorize the notes.
is that a good or bad thing?
i mean just a whole day of sitting down and playing the e-string from the 1st fret all the way to 12 constantly. and so on.


thats very tedious, and you don't get a good sense of phrasing using that method. learn SHAPES for scales in multiple positions, then learn how to transpose. really, learn what the different intervals for scales are, then move them around for the right key
Quote by AA00P
Listen to the man, he's Jewish.
#8
Quote by guitarsftw
thats very tedious, and you don't get a good sense of phrasing using that method. learn SHAPES for scales in multiple positions, then learn how to transpose. really, learn what the different intervals for scales are, then move them around for the right key


im sorry but
Whut?lol
could you show me a lesson on that perhaps?
Classical Guitarist
#9
I suggest memorizing atleast the note names for the E string today.. its only 12 notes dude.. just work on only the E string for today, then the A tomorrow.. without knowing where the notes are on the fretboard theory is just going to seem more confusing. You seem lost with basic music theory terms, you should wikipedia words you don't understand or maybe thing about getting a teacher.. its hard to learn online if you really don't know anything
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Mar 25, 2009,
#10
Spending an entire day on it is a waste of time, you wont process any more information than if you did it for an hour. Spend 20 minutes a day memorizing notes. Memorize three notes at a time, all on the same string. Everyday, once you feel you have the new set memorized, use these notes in making chords, or coming up with a solo.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#11
Quote by kingofdudes161

EDIT: after readin this I remember how tough it was to start this.

yes it was very hard, i had theory books for 6 months before i (recently) picked them up and used them.

now i make my own worksheets to test my theory.

usually i just print out some blank sheet music, scribble down a random interval, then i say, OK, invert, said interval.

or ill do it w/ triads, like 'make a diminished triad out of the random root i wrote down'

its actually pretty fun once you finally get into theory.
My last.fm
Quote by OMMad
i've always found pop to be harder to play than metal... especially shred metal... it's just really fast tremolo picking and the occasional palm mute... and the only chords you have to worry about are power chords...