#1
okay so about three years ago i bought an epiphone humingbird and now on the high e the 11 and 15 are statring to become dead notes. Is there any way to fix this.
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#3
Have a look at how the string is sitting when fretted down there. Is it touching another fret or two on the way down?

Sounds like you need to adjust the truss rod. If that's not the problem, it could just be the frets have been worn away. In which case, see Gamerke's post.
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#4
i was thinking i need to ajust it.

is it turning it left for more bend in the neck and right for morre straight or the other way around. or is that just completly wrong
SKY BLUE TEAM OWNS ALL (If we still exsited)
#5
I don't believe just turning the truss rod is the thing to do. If your frets have become dead then that means that some of the other frets have probably lifted in order to cause it. Getting the frets pressed in or possibly even changed may be the solution. Don't just turn the truss rod if you don't know what you're doing.
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#6
Okay I will take it to the guitar shop I go to and ask them to take a look at it because it's not like what has happened with one of my previous guitars that just need an adjustment of the truss rod
SKY BLUE TEAM OWNS ALL (If we still exsited)
#7
If it were just buzzing then a truss rod may be the right thing to do--depending on the amount of relief you already have. But yeah, take it to a reputable shop and they should be able to fix it for you.
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#8
Quote by captivate
If it were just buzzing then a truss rod may be the right thing to do...

Adjusting the truss rod wont help him beyond the 12th fret, because its most likely secured to the neck block by that point. You had it right in your first post. My guess would be a popped-up fret also. In either case, a competent guitar tech should find the problem quickly.
#9
Quote by GC Shred Off
Adjusting the truss rod wont help him beyond the 12th fret, because its most likely secured to the neck block by that point.



Good point. I've actually never thought of that before.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
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- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#10
I have a Alvarez acoustic it played fine when I got it but now its has dead spots at the thirteenth fret I was told it could be caused by the fret board drying out and shrinking from the winter weather and to humidify it I have not tried this yet. But maybe this could be your problem if your frets aren't wore out.
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Last edited by Rodney Rocket at Mar 25, 2009,
#11
Quote by GC Shred Off
Adjusting the truss rod wont help him beyond the 12th fret, because its most likely secured to the neck block by that point. You had it right in your first post. My guess would be a popped-up fret also. In either case, a competent guitar tech should find the problem quickly.

Could either you or Captivate or Jimtaka or some other knowledgeable person please write a sticky re: truss rods and their intended purpose and use?

It seems like any time there is a question about action, intonation, buzzing or dead frets, half of UG jumps in with, "TRUSS ROD!!!" It scares me that new acoustic players are reading these threads and being given potentially damaging information. I picture them sitting at home cranking away at their truss rods, and cranking some more when their problem's still not solved (because their problem had nothing to do with neck relief in the first place). I don't know why it worries me so, but it does.

It's my understanding that truss rods rarely need adjusting in acoustics. Is this wrong? Is fiddling with truss rods something that is routinely done with electric guitars? Is that why people are so quick to point to truss rods as the magic solution to everything?
#12
^ It's already been done by yours truely. I wrote it up quite some time ago but it never became a sticky. I've searched for it but am only able to retrieve my most recent 500 posts. It's either been deleted or is archived somewhere that I can't seem to find.

At any rate, you're right to feel the way you do about truss rods. They are not a fix all point on guitars, and they shouldn't be used as a quick action adjustment. They are there to compensate for the pull of the strings on the neck, PERIOD. Yes, the adjustment goes hand in hand with action and playability, but other factors need to be taken into account before one goes rushing in to crank away on the almighty truss rod.
Climate changes are the one exception to the rule as the neck geometry will change with the seasons, and a truss tweak may be in order to compensate. If the guitar is able to cope with a 10-15% overall humidity change without any adverse effects, then there should be no need to adjust the truss to compensate.
#13
Quote by LeftyDave
Climate changes are the one exception to the rule as the neck geometry will change with the seasons, and a truss tweak may be in order to compensate.

Yessir. That's why I choose to give my guitars a twice yearly neck checkup.
#14
Quote by sunshowers
Could either you or Captivate or Jimtaka or some other knowledgeable person please write a sticky re: truss rods and their intended purpose and use?


I don't think I would be the appropriate person to make a write-up on this. Although I know the basics, I'm not comfortable with talking about tinkering with guitars. Dave and GC are probably the much better(in my opinion) people to take care of the job.

I wish we could find dave's old write up on truss rod adjustments. Unfortunately though, I don't think I was a regular(or maybe even a member) yet at the time(maybe?). But yeah, I also share the same viewpoint. I wish people would stop telling others to mess with their truss rods. Especially for action adjustments.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#15
Quote by LeftyDave
^ It's already been done by yours truely. I wrote it up quite some time ago but it never became a sticky. I've searched for it but am only able to retrieve my most recent 500 posts. It's either been deleted or is archived somewhere that I can't seem to find.

At any rate, you're right to feel the way you do about truss rods. They are not a fix all point on guitars, and they shouldn't be used as a quick action adjustment. They are there to compensate for the pull of the strings on the neck, PERIOD. Yes, the adjustment goes hand in hand with action and playability, but other factors need to be taken into account before one goes rushing in to crank away on the almighty truss rod.
Climate changes are the one exception to the rule as the neck geometry will change with the seasons, and a truss tweak may be in order to compensate. If the guitar is able to cope with a 10-15% overall humidity change without any adverse effects, then there should be no need to adjust the truss to compensate.

Ah hah!! LeftyDave was the other name I was trying to remember. Sorry if you felt snubbed.