#1
Lately, I've been studying the relationship between strings on the fret board how they are tuned etc and I'm noticing that within certain areas with certain scales how they can be repeated etc and it's starting to come together nicely.

But I'm still at a point where I can't think of what interval I have etc. I've been playing 8 months so hopefully with a little more work I'll have it down a little better.

So my question is would it be okay and more beneficial to map out some notes on the guitar for a solo, study the intervals, and then play them until I get more comfortable doing so? I can improvise in certain keys a little bit (basically by playing in certain fretboard ares) using the pentatonic boxes but I want to have a grasp on it much better so I know note for note, interval for interval.

My only issue is that I do not want to develop a habit for mapping things out first but maybe it's a good thing as well.

Thanks for your opinions

-MIke
#2
Get yourself a copy of the Guitar Fretboard Workbook. Some might suggest Fretboard Logic but I think the Fretboard workbook's approach is much better (at least it makes more sense to me). I think that the strength of the Fretboard Workbook is that it does more than have you memorize the patterns you are recognizing but will also get you thinking about how it works as well as how it fits together and applies to the fretboard.

I am using this now as a refresher and find myself having mixed feelings of wishing I had somethign like this when I first started out and feeling stupid that I didn't see these things sooner!
Last edited by Prelude2Ruin at Mar 25, 2009,
#3
So my question is would it be okay and more beneficial to map out some notes on the guitar for a solo, study the intervals, and then play them until I get more comfortable doing so?


Yes. Learn to "anchor" intervals to important notes, like the root of the key/chord, and then you can provided you can find THAT note you have all the info you need.
#4
It's probably a very personal thing that everyone does differently, but I like to think in terms of root notes on all strings and the surrounding intervals. It helps me with scales, arpeggios and chords if I know where my root is and I know all of the 3rds, 5ths, 7ths, etc around that note.