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#1
This is going to sound crazy, and you guys are probably going to flame me for being cocky, but I keep having this nagging intuitive feeling that I am a very gifted improve player, especially in blues.

Whenever I hear a blues back track and get in a different creative mindset, my mind literally runs on autopilot with blues licks in my mind. They appear out of nowhere, without any thinking at all, period. The psychotic sounding thing is that I wil sit back and "enjoy" the music playing in my head for hours, except its not my music because I am not thinking about...I literally feel like it comes from nowhere, and its good stuff, otherwise I would not sit back and listen to myself.

This only happens occasionally, usually after listening to a brief blues lick or chord progression..my mind goes haywire.

I can't reproduce the licks in my head live, since I spend too much effort thinking about where the notes are on the fretboard...and when I think too much I lose the creative edge and the music in my head just dissapears.

I have taken steps to translate this sound in my head on to the fretboard by "capturing a lick" that I just thought of and immediately transcribing it, although it is very difficult for me to do.

I believe Eddie Van Halen mentioned something about this, he didn't think about his spontaneous solo licks, he felt like they came from an outside source, but he didn't question it.


Lol I sounds like a fricken psychopath.
#2
Let me get this straight. Occasionally you experience bouts of good playing that you can't reliably reproduce and don't understand. On top of this, you get completely lost when attempting to think about what you're playing, and are unable to translate what you hear in your head to the instrument.

This would make you the opposite of a "gifted lead player".
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#3
Gifted is a quite meaningless word.

Obviously you like ur own stuff, because you choose what you want to play, and not someone else.

If this appeals to other people is a totally different story.

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#4
I don't know if I agree there. Half the time I don't like what I play, which is why I keep practising.
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Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


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theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#5
Modesty will take you a long way.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#6
i think i'd grant you the word gifted when you can place what is in your head to the fretboard.

a better word or phrase might be that you think you have a creative mind for it etc.
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#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
Let me get this straight. Occasionally you experience bouts of good playing that you can't reliably reproduce and don't understand. On top of this, you get completely lost when attempting to think about what you're playing, and are unable to translate what you hear in your head to the instrument.

This would make you the opposite of a "gifted lead player".

+1

archeos an ass..... but he's usually right. this is no exception.
#8
Gifted doesn't mean you can play what you hear, that makes you a musician, gifted means nothing.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#9
so the guy with the drug-shroom username thinks his "inspiration" comes from nowhere ( i think i no where it comes from)
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#10
Quote by psychosylocibin
I wil sit back and "enjoy" the music playing in my head for hours, except its not my music because I am not thinking about...I literally feel like it comes from nowhere, and its good stuff, otherwise I would not sit back and listen to myself.




That's exactly how I write lead parts, you're not unique.

Talent is in the eye of the beholder, record some of your music and then I'll tell you how bad it is
#11
I'm pretty sure anyone can think of licks in their head.. it's easy.
if you can't play them as you think of them then it isn't anything special..
#12
Avis, What I am saying is that I get this sort of subconscious playing in my head. It comes out of nowhere, and I have difficulty harnessing it. But when it comes out it sounds very good and I have been attempting to improvise more on the guitar to bridge the gap between what is playing in my head and to reproduce it on the fretboard.

I wrote this on a whim, so the title of "gifted lead player" is misleading. I guess a more correct term would be "gifted lead player in my mind". I just need to bridge the gap and translate it on the fretboard.

Yes all you people are flaming me for not being modest. I don't want self-recognition from this post, I am searching for someone that might have similar experiences. That is all.
#13
Everyone has similar experiences.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#14
Happens to everyone that starts off, they get excited by the sounds they make. But once someone else hears it, it pretty much goes downhill from there lol. Then you're all like... alright I should take some lessons.
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#15
It would help if you had samples of your gifted improvisational playing on your profile.

You may be very good or you may be really bad.

The great players are always modest and respectful of others (Vai, Satch, MacAlpine, DiMeola..... malmsteen :P)
#16
If TS can't play what they hear then my guess would be bad.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#17
I do consider myself very modest. Saying that I hear "ok" sounding stuff in my head would completely defeat the purpose of posting this thread. I also said " I am going to get flamed" in my message, because I knew beforehand the message sounds very conceited and cocky.

I have a small recording studio set up at home and in the next week am going to try to get some samples up.
#18
Weird you say that, I have that same thing happen to me with a lick in my head. Except it's always on a bass guitar and it sounds like it has a trumpet and trombone backing it up. This is strange because I don't play bass, but electric guitar.
#19
I think it's actually normal. Atleast my "mind" plays music for me as well.
To learn putting the licks to notes, hum them, record them, and then you can repeat them however much you want to put them down.
Also learn how which intervals sound. I can actually write the intervals of the key notes down of solos in my head down, without any instrument arround or without humming them(Although with practice you could probably write whole solos down, I can only write the "sustained" note, not the fast licks). This would be usefull if these moments come to you random, so that you can write them down wherever you are.
Untill then record you humming it.
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Last edited by pinguinpanic at Mar 25, 2009,
#21
Inspiration comes in every breath of life for us musicians. I think it's a gift to be able to harness this inspiration much like a visual artist can paint a masterpiece.

They always say that silence is our canvas for which we can weave reality from absolute silence.

Rock on dude, keep practicing.
-Tommy S.
#23
I don't think that makes you a very gifted lead player. Or even an average lead player. I would hear music in my head before I ever picked up the instrument. I would lay in bed at night and conjure up the most amazing sounding songs in my mind. It would get me really excited and I wanted to make them real. I didn't know anything about music so I would try to draw pictures of what they should sound like. I started learning an instrument.

Years later I'm still trying to get those things out of my head and on to paper. But it takes a lot of focus and patience to get the song out and such a wealth of ideas can be
a counterproductive. I continuously get distracted by the next idea as they continuously stream in from no where. But I wouldn't wish it away.

My goal is to become fluent on the guitar. When I reach the point where I can use my instrument to express musical ideas as they enter my mind as easily as I can express other ideas with my speech, I will feel like I am a true musician.
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Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 25, 2009,
#24
Quote by TheGallowsPole
Modesty will take you a long way.
Yeah, really.
Quote by tubatom868686
No, its blues. Being the best blues improver is like being the smartest kid with down syndrome.
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Blues is easy as hell to improv man...
Try Phrygian dominant in G. (I don't even know how to do that...)
What?
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#25
The word is "improv."
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#26
Sounds more like "muscle memory" to me. Your fingers are probably repeating the same pentatonic licks over and over and you just feel amazing because you are so used to playing them that you can zone out and "enjoy the music". It's a fairly easy thought process to fall into when dealing with the blues...
#28
Quote by tubatom868686
No, its blues. Being the best blues improver is like being the smartest kid with down syndrome.


I almost sigged it. Almost.
#29
I completely disagree with that, the fact that there are famous blues guitar players should disprove that, seeing as how they don't all get lost in the shuffle.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#30
Quote by tubatom868686
No, its blues. Being the best blues improver is like being the smartest kid with down syndrome.


haha, that's dumb and inaccurate but i still like the comparison (especially really slow blues)
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#31
yeah, that happens to most musicians i think.
the hard part is translating the music in your head to your instrument--and thats when practicing scales and tons of ear training comes in very handy. A good thing to do for practice is to hear a lick in your head, and just repeat it untill you can play it on your instrument, then transpose it accros several keys--alot of jazz greats learn(ed?) most music in all 12 keys.
#32
Quote by TheGallowsPole
I completely disagree with that, the fact that there are famous blues guitar players should disprove that, seeing as how they don't all get lost in the shuffle.


Still though, it doesnt take much to be good at blues...not much at all really
#33
Quote by tubatom868686
Still though, it doesnt take much to be good at blues...not much at all really

Lets hear how good you are at the blues?

It isn't the most difficult genre, but I don't think its any easier than rock, or metal really ;/
#34
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
Lets hear how good you are at the blues?

It isn't the most difficult genre, but I don't think its any easier than rock, or metal really ;/


I can shred the blues, but I dont have anyway to record it. If you wanna send me a mic, Id gladly lay something down.

And Id agree. Rock really is just heavier blues (if your thinking led zeppelin/the who/random 70's rock). I think for lead metals a little tougher just cause it incorporates more techniques more often, and some of it really is tricky.

But in the grand scheme of things, all three of the genres are pretty easy.
#35
Quote by tubatom868686
I can shred the blues, but I dont have anyway to record it. If you wanna send me a mic, Id gladly lay something down.

And Id agree. Rock really is just heavier blues (if your thinking led zeppelin/the who/random 70's rock). I think for lead metals a little tougher just cause it incorporates more techniques more often, and some of it really is tricky.

But in the grand scheme of things, all three of the genres are pretty easy.

big woop. you can "shred" the blues? so that makes you a good blues player? it takes a lot more to play good blues than technical chops.

blues is actually quite hard to get the right sound and feel for. a lot of technically gifted players can't play blues very well. its kinda hard to explain but there is a certain sound with blues that more advanced players seem to forget about. but people who play only blues have it for sure. but i guess that could be said about any style. so really, blues can be just as hard as any style. just because the blues scale is pretty simple, doesnt mean blues is. in fact, good blues players use a few different modes in their playing as well as changing scales to follow chords. mixolydian, dorian, and the minor scale are used in blues as well as mixing minor and major pentatonic. which is not as simple as it sounds. phrasing is key here.

anyways this is getting off topic. TS, i dont think this makes you any more gifted than the rest of us. sounds pretty common to me. you might want to record yourself though. even just you hearing yourself from the other side can change your opinion. i know it has for me.
#36
Quote by tubatom868686
I can shred the blues

That statement alone tells me you don't know much about blues
#37
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
big woop. you can "shred" the blues? so that makes you a good blues player? it takes a lot more to play good blues than technical chops.

blues is actually quite hard to get the right sound and feel for. a lot of technically gifted players can't play blues very well. its kinda hard to explain but there is a certain sound with blues that more advanced players seem to forget about. but people who play only blues have it for sure. but i guess that could be said about any style. so really, blues can be just as hard as any style. just because the blues scale is pretty simple, doesnt mean blues is. in fact, good blues players use a few different modes in their playing as well as changing scales to follow chords. mixolydian, dorian, and the minor scale are used in blues as well as mixing minor and major pentatonic. which is not as simple as it sounds. phrasing is key here.

anyways this is getting off topic. TS, i dont think this makes you any more gifted than the rest of us. sounds pretty common to me. you might want to record yourself though. even just you hearing yourself from the other side can change your opinion. i know it has for me.


It really isnt that hard. In fact, its one of the easiest genres Ive ever played. Your probably pissed cause you love the old blues stars and youve dedicated all your playing and money towards gear to playing blues and possibly rock. You probably show off for friends and family and think your licks are comparable to BB Kind or Muddy Waters. But now as you meet with other real musicians you are slowly realizing how little you actually know how far little blues has taught you about music

How do I know this? Because I was in your shoes once

Who knows, maybe I totally misjudged. But its a trap a lot of blues players, especially young ones, fall into.
#38
Quote by tubatom868686
It really isnt that hard. In fact, its one of the easiest genres Ive ever played. Your probably pissed cause you love the old blues stars and youve dedicated all your playing and money towards gear to playing blues and possibly rock. You probably show off for friends and family and think your licks are comparable to BB Kind or Muddy Waters. But now as you meet with other real musicians you are slowly realizing how little you actually know how far little blues has taught you about music

How do I know this? Because I was in your shoes once

Who knows, maybe I totally misjudged. But its a trap a lot of blues players, especially young ones, fall into.



Dude you seriously shouldnt talk this much **** without any proof to backup your playing
#39
Quote by Peaceful Rocker


Dude you seriously shouldnt talk this much **** without any proof to backup your playing


I know it sounds like talkin ****, but it really is the truth. I know because a lot of my friends are the same way, and I was the same way. But once I busted out of that shell, I realized the kind of tunnel vision you get from just playing one genre. Especially one as simple as blues.

You start thinking your really good, and then you talk yourself into a situation with real, serious musicians, and your ****ed cause you dont know ****.

I wish I could give you recordings, but the only ones I even have are of classical tuba playing >_>

I do have a lot of gigging experience to back up my playing though. Ive done almost everything from bars to theatres at least once. And Im doing a short week long tour of Europe next week. I guess I can scrounge and find something if yall really want. But it wont be blues cause I dont ever do that kind of recording
#40
My English teacher was talking about an author today who, when asked where she got the ideas for her novels from, responded by saying that they just came to her; she felt she was merely a medium of the universe.
Practice more, make your instrument an extension of whatever' going on in your head so you can prove how right you are. :p
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