#1
recently i discovered that i've lost my ability to improvise solos, i used to be able to improvise no end and i can still write good solos when i have time to sit down and think about them but i just can't think of anything on the spot anymore. some tips from you guys would be much appreciated
you are what you is
#2
If you feel it : play it
If you don't feel it : play exercise or learn song

you can't improvise something if you're not ''in the mood''
it's as simple as that, just play what you feel when you feel it ( if you feel it )
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Nicely put good sir

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#3
Most people don't really make stuff up on the spot when they improvise - they use all the stuff they know already and link it together in different ways. Learn some licks, make some of you own up and learn them, learn other peoples solos, and just practice noodling to a backing track .The more you do it the more natural it'll become.
#4
What helps me when I get in a rut is working on my phrasing. Playing simple licks over and over, and trying to phrase them in new ways.

Also, there's no shame in using Min./Maj. pentatonic scales when you're struggling with improvising leads. Don't try too hard. Let it flow, and keep it simple at first.

Hope this helps!
Last edited by MKnopflerIsGod at Mar 28, 2009,
#6
The most important part of improvising is your ear. Develop the hell out of your ear, and you'll be able to play what you hear in your head. Warning, this will take alot of time, but is damn worth it (so I hear).
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Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


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theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#8
Quote by The_Sophist
The most important part of improvising is your ear. Develop the hell out of your ear, and you'll be able to play what you hear in your head. Warning, this will take alot of time, but is damn worth it (so I hear).

This guy.

Once you can play what you hear you will start sound much much better. Practice by singing what you want to play before you play it and also at the same time. Watch most blues guitarist as the are the easiest to see doing this onstage. Your solos will become more melodic and move away from being a lick player.
#9
Quote by The_Sophist
The most important part of improvising is your ear. Develop the hell out of your ear, and you'll be able to play what you hear in your head. Warning, this will take alot of time, but is damn worth it (so I hear).


yeah i'm in the process of training my ear at the moment, i can recognize any interval and octave or smaller. Its much more difficult with ones bigger than an octave.

Quote by speedy1330
learn your scales - pentatonic blues minor yeah!


its not that i don't know my scales or from a lack of theory knowledge, i think the problem is that i think about playing the notes too much


thanks for the posts people
Last edited by mergapoot at Mar 28, 2009,
#10
Then I suggest learning the blues, as it worked for me. Just sit around with your guitar and screw around over a backing track for awhile, and it'll help develop.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.