#1
How important is it for your instructor to have a degree in music? I have been teaching guitar and drum lessons at a private school for the last 3 years, and wanted to get a job teaching for a shop, but it seems they are only interested if you have a degree. I'm not a professional, but I did take private lessons for many years, have 4 years teaching experience, and would consider myself above average at both guitar and drums.
#3
IT depends.

Really, it depends lol.

There are people with many degrees who are without a job, and people without degrees owning corporations.

In the end it comes down to the most persistent, and socially smart.

Why don't you talk to the guys at the shop about it? With such experience, and stuff to back it up, you would have a good chance.

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#4
My studio is located at a music shop in Exeter, NH. None of our teachers have degrees in music (although a few have college degrees). When the owners bring in a new teacher they consider these things.

1. Is the person knowledgeable of the instrument?
2. Is the potential teacher personable?
3. Are we dealing with a reliable person?
4. Do we need a folk guitar teacher or a person who knows heavy metal etc.?
5. Are we looking for a male or a female teacher?

The store asks these questions because the students who contact them have preferences that need to be accommodated. The image that a store maintains with its community is important. Our store is closer to a "School of Rock" than an upscale conservatory of classical music. The conservatory is going to restrict its hiring of new teachers to those who have degrees.

One other thing to consider is that a store may just need something to reduce the amount of applicants with. If there are fifty applicants and you don't want to be bothered with setting up fifty interviews, you may use the degree as a method of reducing your pool of applicants to make your job easier.
#6
Quote by GuitarMC
My studio is located at a music shop in Exeter, NH. None of our teachers have degrees in music (although a few have college degrees). When the owners bring in a new teacher they consider these things.

1. Is the person knowledgeable of the instrument?
2. Is the potential teacher personable?
3. Are we dealing with a reliable person?
4. Do we need a folk guitar teacher or a person who knows heavy metal etc.?
5. Are we looking for a male or a female teacher?

The store asks these questions because the students who contact them have preferences that need to be accommodated. The image that a store maintains with its community is important. Our store is closer to a "School of Rock" than an upscale conservatory of classical music. The conservatory is going to restrict its hiring of new teachers to those who have degrees.

One other thing to consider is that a store may just need something to reduce the amount of applicants with. If there are fifty applicants and you don't want to be bothered with setting up fifty interviews, you may use the degree as a method of reducing your pool of applicants to make your job easier.


Thanks for your answer this helped a lot. Unfortunately whenever I ask a store if they are hiring instructors they say they can hardly get enough students for the teachers they already have.

Can I ask your opinion on age? I'm 19 and think that most stores see that as me being inexperienced or unreliable. I see it as a positive, I think it helps to diversify the staff, and I think I can relate more to the kids who want to learn, because I have taught 10-15 year olds the last 4 years.
#7
And the people there have taught twice as many 10-15 year olds in the last year.

No, a degree is not essential to teaching, but it is essential if the employer in which you are interested requires said degree. I could teach algebra and vector calculus to students here, even though most of the students taking algebra are juniors and seniors (I'm a sophomore) but if I went to my chairman and asked if I could teach algebra and vector calculus, not TA the classes but be Professor [Surname], I would be told to ask him when I have a PhD in mathematics or am at least a graduate student.

Leave the arrogance to me.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
And the people there have taught twice as many 10-15 year olds in the last year.

No, a degree is not essential to teaching, but it is essential if the employer in which you are interested requires said degree. I could teach algebra and vector calculus to students here, even though most of the students taking algebra are juniors and seniors (I'm a sophomore) but if I went to my chairman and asked if I could teach algebra and vector calculus, not TA the classes but be Professor [Surname], I would be told to ask him when I have a PhD in mathematics or am at least a graduate student.

Leave the arrogance to me.

I don't agree with that comparison at all. Do you still think you would be qualified to tutor in math? Many students do tutor, but being a teacher is a job that is required by law to have a degree.
#9
As far as I see it, a degree is just one more way of proving that you are knowledgeable. By no means is it the only thing to take into account, but it should certainly be considered
#10
Some people are bad teachers, but can play certain stuff on the guitar, that you might find very appealing and want to learn in ur own guitarplaying.

Then you could argue if he's a good teacher.

A teacher should be able to notice "basic" mistakes, like palmmuting, dynamics, playing in time etc.

Guitar is not a skill with an absolute right or wrong.

Music (Theory) teacher is totally different. This is right or wrong, so yes here you truly have good and bad teachers.

To make a huge final leap.

ALL the things we learn are originally invented by people without degrees and are now accepted. A degree is just a proof what you can do, but doesn't mean that without a degree you can't do it.

It's entirely possible to "re-invent" for urself the stuff that is taught.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 27, 2009,
#11
Thanks for your answer this helped a lot. Unfortunately whenever I ask a store if they are hiring instructors they say they can hardly get enough students for the teachers they already have.

Can I ask your opinion on age? I'm 19 and think that most stores see that as me being inexperienced or unreliable. I see it as a positive, I think it helps to diversify the staff, and I think I can relate more to the kids who want to learn, because I have taught 10-15 year olds the last 4 years.

One of our current teachers was hired a few years ago before he even graduated from high school. He is a very naturally talented player and the owners of the store knew him well before hiring him. I personally thought they were taking a risk, but he has proven to be a valuable asset to the business. He is more aware of the music that is popular with today's youth. This trait along with his impressive skills on the guitar gave him a good start. As the years go by, his teaching skills have improved, just as they would with anyone. Everyone needs a few years to develop and improve their curriculum and our store is willing to give it's teachers a chance to do that. There is a large demand for guitar lessons in our area of the country, so the store does not have a big problem finding new students.

The approach listed below might help you find a job teaching guitar:
1. Find students on your own thru local advertising and hanging flyers
2. If you prefer to teach out of a studio located at a music store, don't limit yourself to a small regional area. There is a good chance that no local music stores are looking for teachers.
3. Create a website devoted to advertising your teaching skills. A teacher who has some online marketing skills would impress any music store.
4. Offer to teach the students you already have at each prospective music store.
5. Make your resume look better than it is. If you performed one time at a party call that "extensive performance experience". If you took a music appreciation course in high school, then mention that you achieved high honors on a scholastic level in music related courses. If you can read music or have a good understanding of music theory, then you should mention it.

Hopefully this helps.......

#12
You don't need a teaching certificate from the state to teach a college class. Certainly, you didn't think I meant teaching algebra and vector calculus to high school students, did you? People take multi-variable and vector calculus as high students, but they typically have to take the classes at a local university or college.

Yeah, if I think I can be a professor, I think I could handle tutor.


Oh, when I say algebra, I don't mean the quadratic formula and the like; algebra on its own, to a math person, refers to abstract algebra. Have some fun and look it up on Wiki.