#1
I bought me a new guitar.
The last guitar I played I did the barre chords fairly easy with good tones and it was consistent.

Now with my new guitar I am finding it rather difficult to push enough pressure on the frets to stop the buzzing on the frets. I am really pushing HARD to make it stop or to go away. Very big difference from the other guitar.

Sometimes as I let off to change a chord I get a quick buzz also on a fret.
The biggest problem I have is the F chord up next to the nut is where it is the hardest to push down. The rest i could live with if I "have" too.

My two questions is having to push that HARD is a fault in the guitar, correct?
In short is it "just" the "type" of guitar I got is it or I am stuck with hard pushing without being about to fix it.

If it is a fault in the guitar , what would fix the amount of pressure to not have to push so hard and the other chord changing buzz. What would need adjusted?
#2
I used to had the same problem on my very first guitar which cost something like 250$ if I remember well... it was like that only when I was pressing the frets from 1 to 6 and even some times the 0 :S
I changed of guitar and my problem got solved, but now, with my 380$ guitar, I'm still having some frets that would buzz like the 9th of the 4th cord.
All my guitar were classical
#3
its probabley a much larger string gauge than u are used to or its a higher acton than u are used to or both...
#4
the problem is the guitar. this is not unusual. the action on your guitar is probably too low esp around the nut. if the buzzing is not too bad try adjusting your truss rob slightly so it lifts the strings away from the fret board. i suggest you research how to do this before you attempt
#6
Sorry do not know how to use the quote feature, new to forum.

""its probabley a much larger string gauge than u are used to or its a higher acton than u are used to or both...""


The older guitar I was using from my grandmother had medium.... new guitar started with a light, then changed to medium to try and correct the problem with no luck.


""the problem is the guitar. this is not unusual. the action on your guitar is probably too low esp around the nut. if the buzzing is not too bad try adjusting your truss rob slightly so it lifts the strings away from the fret board. i suggest you research how to do this before you attempt""


I did the truss rod adjustment with no luck.. So adjusting the action would make it easier to push down a barre? This is where I am confused... so if you have the info shed some light if ya don't mind. From my understanding the higher the action the harder it is to push. Yet the action on my guitar is low. I am at a loss.

My two questions is having to push that HARD is a fault in the guitar, correct?
Could be relevant to tell us which guitar you have got


Not really if pushing hard is how the guitar is made then I want nothing to do with it.
Even if a guitar was made to push hard, could it be adjusted? If you must know it's a Fender CD60CE
Last edited by AustinTyler at Mar 26, 2009,
#7
if the action on your guitar is too low, than you won't be able to get rid of all the buzz, no matter how hard you press. too much action should only make it harder to play single, quick notes because while moving your finger, there would be more time that the string is touching your finger before it hits the fret. think about it in an extreme. imagine how hard it would be to play if the string was an centimeter off the fretboard, it would be hard to play fast, right? but once you got a chord in place, the strings won't buzz up against the strings. hope that helps a little
#8
Quote by -will-
if the action on your guitar is too low, than you won't be able to get rid of all the buzz, no matter how hard you press. too much action should only make it harder to play single, quick notes because while moving your finger, there would be more time that the string is touching your finger before it hits the fret. think about it in an extreme. imagine how hard it would be to play if the string was an centimeter off the fretboard, it would be hard to play fast, right? but once you got a chord in place, the strings won't buzz up against the strings. hope that helps a little



Yes it helps very much.... I think I need to raise it near the nut and lower it at the ( correct me if I am wrong) the saddle. What your saying in short is there is a fine line and both have bad extremes to them.

What you say should make the buzz go way and it easier to press.

It just gives me a bit of an idea to tell the guys what I want when I have them work on it so I do not have to be running back and forth trying to get this thing fixed... quite depressing not being able to play my guitar.

Let just say you had a guitar and you wanted it easier to press down without alot of force what would be the first big major change you would make that would make the most difference?
#9
HOLD UP.

There have been many things said in this thread that are NOT right. It seem as if a lot of people have been giving conflicting answers.

You have a problem with pushing the strings down and it buzzes because you can't hold them down. This does NOT mean you have fret buzz. This means you have high action.

Whoever said to move the truss rod was wrong to tell you so. Do NOT move the truss rod unless you know EXACTLY what its purpose is--to adjust bow and relief ONLY.

The probem right now is that the action is too high. Using medium strings will make the problem even worse because medium strings have a higher string tension than lights(about 30lbs more). Go back to light and it should be easier.

How high is the action at the nut and at the 12th fret?
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#10
What "guys" are going to be working on your guitar? Are they guitar techs? If they're of any competence, you won't have to tell them how to do their job, especially for a problem as common as too high/too low action. I sincerely hope that these guys have more expertise than you - let them diagnose the issue.

If you're finding it extremely difficult to bar the first fret the LAST thing you want to do is RAISE it at the nut. The truss rod is only for adjusting neck relief, which is the amount of "bend" in the neck. Relief and action are NOT THE SAME THING.

And +1 to everything captivate just said.
Last edited by sunshowers at Mar 26, 2009,
#11
Quote by sunshowers
I sincerely hope that these guys have more expertise than you - let them diagnose the issue.
.



Totally agree... I am just more lost than i was before. Though I did wanna try to learn.

It seems to my uneducated eyes ( with guitars ) that the nut area is low and as it goes down the neck it gets VERY high. Toward even my fifth fret it is pretty high. Sometimes it even buzzes when playing open but rarely.

Would that still be consider high action?

Near the neck I can take two THIN picks between the string and first fret and it will rub. Near the body (14th fret) I wouldn't doubt if it was a 1/4 of an inch off the fret board.

Yall right though .. I am going to let this quit bothering me and have them fix it Saturday.

What "guys" are going to be working on your guitar? Are they guitar techs?

Yes the company I bought the guitar from.
Last edited by AustinTyler at Mar 26, 2009,
#12
Quote by AustinTyler

It seems to my uneducated eyes ( with guitars ) that the nut area is low and as it goes down the neck it gets VERY high. Toward even my fifth fret it is pretty high. Sometimes it even buzzes when playing open but rarely.

Would that still be consider high action?

Near the neck I can take two THIN picks between the string and first fret and it will rub. Near the body (14th fret) I wouldn't doubt if it was a 1/4 of an inch off the fret board.

All I can say, having never seen or played your guitar, is that it is absolutely normal for the distance between the neck and the strings to increase as you go down the neck.

Think about it this way -- if you wanted the distance between the strings and the fretboard to be the same all the way down the neck, that would mean the neck would have to be perfectly straight. If the neck was totally straight you wouldn't be able to fret any string without the string touching all the way down the length of the neck. That wouldn't make a very pretty sound, would it? The precise degree of "bow" in the neck is what allows fretted strings to contact the fretboard at one point only, no matter if you're up near the nut or down near the body.

Yall right though .. I am going to let this quit bothering me and have them fix it Saturday.


Yes the company I bought the guitar from.

Sounds like a good plan