#1
I am mostly a lead player, but according to my guitar teacher, I have problems with rhythm - Ie, keeping up with a funky rhythm, or picking one up and imitating it.

What could I try to improve this?
#2
Subdivide the rhythm and take it real slow, then speed up gradually.
#3
I know how often people will say this but... I'm gonna be the first!

GET A METRONOME!
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#4
If you lack rhythm, as your guitar teacher states, then I can't imagine you would be good as a lead player either. Do you feel like you're a good lead player? You don't have anything posted in your profile to listen to, so we can't really gauge your abilities as a lead or rhythm player. Maybe record a few small snippets of some rhythm stuff and post it in your profile or youtube.com and we could offer more advice.
#5
jamming to records=the best metronomes.........record and playback X 1,000
#6
metron.....nevermind

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#8
When you use a metronome, make sure you're on top of the beat. Don't wait for it to click before you play a note on the beat, play in anticipation of that click. I used to always play behind the beat in jazz band and I had no idea until the drummer pointed it out to me.
#9
So the answer is just using a metronome? Should I just invent a rhythm and try and keep it in time for a minute or w/e?
#10
Quote by gabcd86
I am mostly a lead player, but according to my guitar teacher, I have problems with rhythm - Ie, keeping up with a funky rhythm, or picking one up and imitating it.

What could I try to improve this?


I would suggest:

1) spend more time listening to and playing rhythm guitar parts

2) spend more time studying rhythm fundamentals and practicing them to a metronome.

3) practice the rhythm guitar parts that you're working on to a metronome


* use the metronome to focus on your timing and feel rather than as a way to gauge how fast you are.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 26, 2009,
#11
You might also want to check out the 'Advance Your Guitar Playing' DVD. There is a whole section in there on developing your groove.
#12
Whatever you hear or play, just try and tap the beat. This becomes simpler with practice, and once you have the ability to find the beat and appreciate it without hitting the nearest object, you wont be able to put it away.

From this, you will be able to recognise syncopation (notes going on the off beat) and other rhythmic nuances you didnt hear correctly before. This, obviously, has a beneficial effect on your playing, and you will find yourself making more complicated and "funky" rhythms.
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#13
put metronome at half speed use clicks as beats 2 and 4 practice like this for 55 years.
#14
Quote by ilikebebop
put metronome at half speed use clicks as beats 2 and 4 practice like this for 55 years.


Not recommended advice. It may teach you how to accent 2 and 4, but doing this will leave you in the dust in phrasing
#15
Quote by tubatom868686
Not recommended advice. It may teach you how to accent 2 and 4, but doing this will leave you in the dust in phrasing

It's useful for playing jazz, specifically swing.
#16
When I was little and practicing my rhythms, I would spell out the rhythms to various instrument parts on the radio. For example I would turn it to a popular rock station and count along to one of the instruments. (either 1+2+... or ta ka ta ka... or mm ta ta methods) After awhile your rhythm will start to become solid and tight.

Also, I would steal my brothers drum books and go through the snare routines playing a chord or one note instead. This helped my rhythms very very much. I still go back to the drum books when my 16th note divisions start to get a bit shaky on those darn charlie parker solos.
#17
Quote by pwrmax
It's useful for playing jazz, specifically swing.


As someone who frequently plays medium to high end jazz gigs (just played with the new york voices tonight), I can tell you that it hurts more then it helps.
#19
Quote by gabcd86
So the answer is just using a metronome? Should I just invent a rhythm and try and keep it in time for a minute or w/e?


Yes, you MUST have a metronome. Even the coolest riffs suffer horribly unless you can play them exactly in time. Personally, I never practice anything without a metronome or drum track because getting into the habit of playing out of time is very bad indeed.

After you get a metronome, I suggest you work on some rhythm drills. I found the drills in "Progressive Metal Guitar" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1864691808) very handy.

Or, take a look at stuff like this:
http://www.guitarworld.com/article/guitar_101_mastering_rhythm_and_syncopation_part_1

http://www.guitarworld.com/article/guitar_101_mastering_rhythm_and_syncopation_part_2

If you don't know how, learn how to count all the notes (e.g. 8th notes are "1 and 2 and 3 and 4") and all that jazz. Then, starting with easy rhythms, work your way up to the hardest rhythms you can find. Try to work out the rhythm before you listen to an example audio track, then check the audio track to see if you figured out the rhythm correctly...then practice with the metronome until you get it EXACTLY right at the correct tempo. And go SLOW at first...it will be very hard, but your playing will improve like mad. And make sure not to neglect learning triplet rhythms (quarter, eighth, and sixteenth note triplets), this will also seem very hard at first if you aren't already familiar with them.

When I first learned how to play no teacher ever told me to use a metronome...and I am completely freakin baffled as to why.
Last edited by axxchor at Mar 27, 2009,
#20
Ah, I have a metronome, but it mostly gathers dust cos I have a very poor work ethic, and to be honest, anything complex scares me off, which is why I haven't studied rhythm like you describe for a year. I know all the theory, but putting into practice is... eh.
#21
Quote by gabcd86
I am mostly a lead player, but according to my guitar teacher, I have problems with rhythm - Ie, keeping up with a funky rhythm, or picking one up and imitating it.

What could I try to improve this?

do it more often. try to enjoy rhythm as much as lead too. ive never had a problem with rhythm because i truely enjoy playing a rhythm as much as i do lead. i also jam with people and we all take turns playing rhythm. so that helps too.
#22
Ah, I have a metronome, but it mostly gathers dust cos I have a very poor work ethic, and to be honest, anything complex scares me off, which is why I haven't studied rhythm like you describe for a year. I know all the theory, but putting into practice is... eh.


I think you just answered your initial question....
#23
Quote by tubatom868686
Not recommended advice. It may teach you how to accent 2 and 4, but doing this will leave you in the dust in phrasing

i do this and usually accent 1 and 3 harder than 2 and 4 while i do it idk
Last edited by ilikebebop at Mar 27, 2009,
#24
Quote by ilikebebop
i do this and usually accent 1 and 3 harder than 2 and 4 while i do it idk


Im not dissin your playing or anything, but I just never went with the whole metronome on 2 an 4 thing. It slows your rate of learning to phrase, and even in jazz, 1 is still the most important beat