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#1
God I'm a ***** for this forum

My band has been doing well recently, got lots of decent shows coming up and we are starting to finally build a fanbase. We're doing a few little things to alter our overall image. The drummer wears a flak jacket, the bassist wears all denim and i don the whole indian hendrixy bandana thing. It works for us. I've also started playing some intresting lines using a lighter as a slide, and we've incorperated some imagery into our set (we're probably investing in some foggers, lighting equipment etc etc). But I had a funny question. Would it be detrimental for our band to get some beautiful girls dressed in mostly leather and nothing to dance and sing backup for us to add to our stage show, or would it take away from the raw 3 person fueled fury of our band?
#2
if you play metal then you should know the correct answer...
wtf do you need some bitches for, its about the music
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#3
it pretty much depends on a lot of things:

- what genre are you guys?

- how old are you guys and who are your fans?

- where would you get the dancers? pro dancers or friends?

- Are the dancers there to primarily look sexy and attract the males?
#4
Perhaps just trying it for a less important show, I wouldn't suggest using girlfriends or family as it might be difficult to tell them its not working.

G'Luck

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#5
lmao ur kidding me right???backup singers in leather???jeez man thats hardcore
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#6
Quote by One on Sunday
it pretty much depends on a lot of things:

- what genre are you guys?

- how old are you guys and who are your fans?

- where would you get the dancers? pro dancers or friends?

- Are the dancers there to primarily look sexy and attract the males?



Hard Rock / Progressive / Heavy Metal

Our fans are non-existent but as of now we are trying to break into the 18-25 demographic

Dancers aquired via art students i am affiliated with

Yes and it would be an interesting way to seperate ourselves from other rock bands
#7
Well... It has potential...

You will however attract the wrong crowd though. The ones that just come to fap because you have hot dancers. However, if your music is really good, they might space out. And then you have (more) fans :P
#8
No need for dancing girls, if your music is good enough you don't need to use sex to sell yourselves
#9
No need for dancing girls, if your music is good enough you don't need to use sex to sell yourselves


I think Dragonforce have been working on pretty much that premise for a while. Only not deliberately, and they've been failing. :P

If they can actually dance, are keen on doing it, and you don't have to pay them much, hell yes. It'll make you stand out a long way. Possibly some people won't be interested/impressed, but they probably wouldn't be into your music anyway.

If they can sing, too...that makes them proper members of the band. Absolutely nothing wrong with backup singers.
#10
When people say "it's all about the music" they secretly mean it's all about the image, culture, and lifestyle associated with the music anyway; the whole reason rock music is fun is because we've been sold on the idea that the culture around it is fun. None of that stuff is inherent in the sound, so I think it's perfectly fine to experiment with anthing else that can bring you fans and better define your band without losing any "authenticity" or other made-up notion. If half of hard rock fans go to a show to jump around and scream, that's no different than going to a show to see some hot young women.

Hell, if they're singing backup you will really change the sound of your band too, and might do so in a very unique and effective way. I can't see anything wrong with trying this out. Just keep an eye on how the audiences respond and don't be afraid to cut the gimmick if it actually starts to undermine you in any way. As long as you're willing to cut it if it fails, go give it a try.
#11
Quote by Highwaytohell
Hard Rock / Progressive / Heavy Metal

Our fans are non-existent but as of now we are trying to break into the 18-25 demographic

Dancers aquired via art students i am affiliated with

Yes and it would be an interesting way to seperate ourselves from other rock bands


then based on that dont do it but i dig the lighter slide thing ill have to try it
\m/ metal up your ass
#12
You could try it I guess, even if it doesn't go great they'll be pretty ladies to leer at.
#13
I think it would have to be the right type of gig to work, if that makes sense. Like I probably wouldn't do it in the typical small(ish) bar/club shows, just seems like it would be weird and ineffective. It would need to be somewhere more open with more of a party type atmosphere, at least the way I'm envisioning it.
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#14
Would work well in context (big gig, sleazy club, lots of lighting) but use sparingly and err on the side of caution.
I know taste isn't something rock bands usually need to worry about, but audiences seem to be increasingly timid and a lot of people don't want to see a show any more, especially in smaller pubs and clubs.


Another possible side-effect is poeple only ever remembering you as 'the band with the hot dancing girls'.
#15
Ya know, if the girls are hot enough, you don't even need the band! Just sit back and collect the cash.
#16
Quote by Josher.K
if you play metal then you should know the correct answer...
wtf do you need some bitches for, its about the music


theres nothing wrong with looking good while your doing something you love

besides hot girls would get ppl to come
sex sells

also i read something that said even though you do it for the love of music its still a business so make your business look good
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#17
Quote by Josher.K
if you play metal then you should know the correct answer...
wtf do you need some bitches for, its about the music


I'm with ya on this one man.
#19
Quote by Highwaytohell
God I'm a ***** for this forum

My band has been doing well recently, got lots of decent shows coming up and we are starting to finally build a fanbase. We're doing a few little things to alter our overall image. The drummer wears a flak jacket, the bassist wears all denim and i don the whole indian hendrixy bandana thing. It works for us. I've also started playing some intresting lines using a lighter as a slide, and we've incorperated some imagery into our set (we're probably investing in some foggers, lighting equipment etc etc). But I had a funny question. Would it be detrimental for our band to get some beautiful girls dressed in mostly leather and nothing to dance and sing backup for us to add to our stage show, or would it take away from the raw 3 person fueled fury of our band?

No, the whole point of playing a gig is to attract the biggest audience you can, that way you get a great gig and the promoter and venue owners book you again because you've made them so much money and did the job they hired you for.
Now, although scantily clad women sounds like it will attract a lot of guys, it actualy puts off a lot of women from coming and seeing your shows, effectively up to half of the audience you could've had, and kinda turns your shows into little more than a strip club review, and you know the kinda guys those shows attract, dirty old men.
That's not gonna be good for business in the long run, and it's not like you can do it just once or twice just to attract a few extra customers because just once or twice will gain you a rep for it, which will be almost impossible to lose.

Do it the hard way, play the best damn shows you are capable of doing and slowly build up a hardcore following of people who like you because of the music you play, not because of the floor show that accompanies you, it'll be worth it eventualy.

Build your lightshow and stage set up by all means, they just accentuate the band, but stay well clear of anything that distracts from the band.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Mar 27, 2009,
#20
^ Listen to Slack. He speaks the truth.
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#21
Now, although scantily clad women sounds like it will attract a lot of guys, it actualy puts off a lot of women from coming and seeing your shows, effectively up to half of the audience you could've had, and kinda turns your shows into little more than a strip club review, and you know the kinda guys those shows attract, dirty old men.


However, remember he's playing hard rock/psychedelic metal. That's not a set of genres that attracts many female fans at the best of times. While you make a good point - and I'm sure people will leap in with dozens of claims about girls they know who love metal - they've already written off a great big chunk of that 50% simply by playing those genres (And a proportion of the other 50%, just to be fair).
I remember going to an Iron Maiden gig - quite a stereotypical metal band, but a really famous and skilled one, and the audience was at least 80%/20% male/female.

Even if having female backup singers/dancers puts some of that small market share off...will it attract/interest more? There's the fact that it also looks a lot more professional than some small band, having backup singers, which will certainly be something most bands don't have.

Weigh up all the factors, including Slacker's, and try and balance it out. It's your band, after all.
#22
I disagree with Slacker. Look at Rob Zombie: he's basically got strippers dancing the whole time he plays, and he's got a surprisingly large female audience, due to his cult status and stature in the horror community.
Look, if you can make this work in a way where they aren't the focus of the show, but rather just enhance the overall visual experience, do it. You have to remember, no matter how good you are, most people at shows just will not remember you. Finding local music is not important to most non-musicians. So, you have to really stand out if you want to build a fan base, and doing something visually different helps that. I say go for it.

Oh, and by the way: all the guys here saying it should all be about the music? Heads firmly up their asses. Do not listen to them, they are undoubtedly 15 year old kids who have played very few shows, if any, and do not yet grasp the reality of the music industry.
#24
Quote by koslack
I disagree with Slacker. Look at Rob Zombie: he's basically got strippers dancing the whole time he plays, and he's got a surprisingly large female audience, due to his cult status and stature in the horror community.
Look, if you can make this work in a way where they aren't the focus of the show, but rather just enhance the overall visual experience, do it. You have to remember, no matter how good you are, most people at shows just will not remember you. Finding local music is not important to most non-musicians. So, you have to really stand out if you want to build a fan base, and doing something visually different helps that. I say go for it.

Oh, and by the way: all the guys here saying it should all be about the music? Heads firmly up their asses. Do not listen to them, they are undoubtedly 15 year old kids who have played very few shows, if any, and do not yet grasp the reality of the music industry.

Actualy I'm a 42 year old guy who's played professionaly for over 20 years.
Although I'm not saying it's all about the music, putting on a 'show' (for me) should involve theatrics and light shows ect. But I've been around long enough to see what works and what doesn't and why.
The simple fact is, to attract the biggest possible audience, it's generaly best to try to attract the biggest possible cross section of society that you can.
This comes up against one problem straight away, the type of music you play. Most music is genre specific, so it instantly alienates those that are not into your own particular genre. Bang, that's a huge chunk of your possible client base (or target demographic) gone. That just leaves the people who actualy like your music, so the next thing that alienates people from your shows is your show itself.
Time for some damage limitation then.
Although it doesn't make much difference to the younger generations, older couples just looking for a good night out would be put off attending your shows if there are scantily clad women on stage. I know for definate that my wife would rather go somewhere else than watch that, no matter how good the band is and I know plenty of other couples my own age with the same attitude.
'Ahh, but that's just you old folks! What do you matter?' I hear you ask.
Well, remember, realisticaly, at the lower end of gigging, you're job is essentialy to sell beer, or rather, to attract an audience for the venue to sell beer to, middle aged folks like myself generaly have more money to spare than teens and generaly buy much more beer than teens, so idealy you want to try and attract a mixture of both teens and middle aged folks, the teens for the atmosphere and the middle aged folks to satisfy the venue owner's accountant.

But the 'setting' also makes a huge difference.
If Highwaytohell said to me 'We're playing a huge theatre gig, should we have showgirls?' then yeah, I'd say 'go for it, and get some fire breathers and jugglers on too!'
On a huge stage, like the ones Rob Zombie regularly plays, then yes, scantily clad women become part of the whole massive spectacle, in the same way that Vegas style showgirls or Parisian can can dancers do in any big theatre production, but in a standard club or bar gig, it tends to look cheap and seedy, it puts off the older end, attracts the wrong crowd and becomes detrimental to your business.
Remember, you said that Rob Zombie attracts a huge audience anyway 'due to his cult status and stature in the horror community.'

Now, importantly, Highwaytohell doesn't have a cult status in the horror comunity and isn't a huge rock star (yet) and is therefore (I assume) talking about gigging in clubs ect.
When Rob Zombie started off playing gigs around the underground clubs of New York, he didn't have dancing girls, he had an idea, an image and clear cut direction he wanted to go in that would eventualy lead him to become successful enough to allow him to play venues large enough to put on a spectacle that dancing girls wouldn't look out of place in.
On a smaller stage, (or 'floor' in many venues) every bit of space you can save is important, you push the backline and kit back as far as you can and the monitors as far forward as you can, if anything is cluttering up the stage left and right, you ask permission to move it and that way make as much room as you can for the band to move with the music without bumping into each other all the time. Add dancing girls to this and more often than not, neither the band nor the girls will have room to do their respective jobs properly and the whole thing ends up looking like a badly organised farce.
#25
Yet again, Slacker kicks everyones ass.
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#26
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Actualy I'm a 42 year old guy who's played professionaly for over 20 years.
Although I'm not saying it's all about the music, putting on a 'show' (for me) should involve theatrics and light shows ect. But I've been around long enough to see what works and what doesn't and why.
The simple fact is, to attract the biggest possible audience, it's generaly best to try to attract the biggest possible cross section of society that you can.
This comes up against one problem straight away, the type of music you play. Most music is genre specific, so it instantly alienates those that are not into your own particular genre. Bang, that's a huge chunk of your possible client base (or target demographic) gone. That just leaves the people who actualy like your music, so the next thing that alienates people from your shows is your show itself.
Time for some damage limitation then.
Although it doesn't make much difference to the younger generations, older couples just looking for a good night out would be put off attending your shows if there are scantily clad women on stage. I know for definate that my wife would rather go somewhere else than watch that, no matter how good the band is and I know plenty of other couples my own age with the same attitude.
'Ahh, but that's just you old folks! What do you matter?' I hear you ask.
Well, remember, realisticaly, at the lower end of gigging, you're job is essentialy to sell beer, or rather, to attract an audience for the venue to sell beer to, middle aged folks like myself generaly have more money to spare than teens and generaly buy much more beer than teens, so idealy you want to try and attract a mixture of both teens and middle aged folks, the teens for the atmosphere and the middle aged folks to satisfy the venue owner's accountant.

But the 'setting' also makes a huge difference.
If Highwaytohell said to me 'We're playing a huge theatre gig, should we have showgirls?' then yeah, I'd say 'go for it, and get some fire breathers and jugglers on too!'
On a huge stage, like the ones Rob Zombie regularly plays, then yes, scantily clad women become part of the whole massive spectacle, in the same way that Vegas style showgirls or Parisian can can dancers do in any big theatre production, but in a standard club or bar gig, it tends to look cheap and seedy, it puts off the older end, attracts the wrong crowd and becomes detrimental to your business.
Remember, you said that Rob Zombie attracts a huge audience anyway 'due to his cult status and stature in the horror community.'

Now, importantly, Highwaytohell doesn't have a cult status in the horror comunity and isn't a huge rock star (yet) and is therefore (I assume) talking about gigging in clubs ect.
When Rob Zombie started off playing gigs around the underground clubs of New York, he didn't have dancing girls, he had an idea, an image and clear cut direction he wanted to go in that would eventualy lead him to become successful enough to allow him to play venues large enough to put on a spectacle that dancing girls wouldn't look out of place in.
On a smaller stage, (or 'floor' in many venues) every bit of space you can save is important, you push the backline and kit back as far as you can and the monitors as far forward as you can, if anything is cluttering up the stage left and right, you ask permission to move it and that way make as much room as you can for the band to move with the music without bumping into each other all the time. Add dancing girls to this and more often than not, neither the band nor the girls will have room to do their respective jobs properly and the whole thing ends up looking like a badly organised farce.



Just so we're clear, I wasn't referring specifically to you. You and axemanchris are pretty much the only 2 guys on this board I would take advice from.
And you make some good points, specifically about the size of the stage. I do disagree with you in terms of demographics: I am a big fan of the idea that there is no such thing as a bad publicity. I would rather have an audience member walk out offended than walk out and forget about my band. As an extension, I don't think theres such a thing as too over the top for a rock band. The first step is to build name recognition, and the only way to do that is to set yourself apart. The hot semi-naked girls will definitely do that.
Also, I disagree that girls will get turned off. Classical feminism is dead. Neo-feminism is in. Camille Paglia is probably the most influential feminist in the world, and she has written extensively on how women must embrace both male and female sexuality. She's even gone so far as to embrace '****-rock' as the most progressive music in terms of sexuality, because it was so raw. I know I've gone off topic, but I think that it's important to understand the current cultural zeitgeist when deciding how to market yourself. In terms of appealing to girls, subtlety is out, red hot lesbian action is in.
Anyway, maybe we should just agree to disagree. I respect you as a guy who's been around the block a few times, and I've seen my fair share of dingy clubs, crappy recording studios and shady characters myself. I've spent time as an engineer, small-time promoter, songwriter and of course, guitarist in bands and on rare occasions, doing sessions. So I'm not putting you down or diminishing you, I'm just coming at this issue from a different angle.
#27
How about instead of whoring out some chicks (who will get harassed on the streets by people who recognize them), you play some songs people can actually dance too?

That way you still have people dancing.. I don't have a band but I play at jam nights and stuff and I always tend to get people on the dance floor because of the songs I choose, I realize you want to play metal, even then, choose some really really well known metal songs (as in, songs that actually made top 10 or something), so people know them and will dance to them.

If you play songs everyone knows and nobodys dancing, either the song sucks, or it's not a song choice problem.
#28
Quote by koslack
Just so we're clear, I wasn't referring specifically to you. You and axemanchris are pretty much the only 2 guys on this board I would take advice from.
And you make some good points, specifically about the size of the stage. I do disagree with you in terms of demographics: I am a big fan of the idea that there is no such thing as a bad publicity. I would rather have an audience member walk out offended than walk out and forget about my band. As an extension, I don't think theres such a thing as too over the top for a rock band. The first step is to build name recognition, and the only way to do that is to set yourself apart. The hot semi-naked girls will definitely do that.
Also, I disagree that girls will get turned off. Classical feminism is dead. Neo-feminism is in. Camille Paglia is probably the most influential feminist in the world, and she has written extensively on how women must embrace both male and female sexuality. She's even gone so far as to embrace '****-rock' as the most progressive music in terms of sexuality, because it was so raw. I know I've gone off topic, but I think that it's important to understand the current cultural zeitgeist when deciding how to market yourself. In terms of appealing to girls, subtlety is out, red hot lesbian action is in.
Anyway, maybe we should just agree to disagree. I respect you as a guy who's been around the block a few times, and I've seen my fair share of dingy clubs, crappy recording studios and shady characters myself. I've spent time as an engineer, small-time promoter, songwriter and of course, guitarist in bands and on rare occasions, doing sessions. So I'm not putting you down or diminishing you, I'm just coming at this issue from a different angle.


I can appreciate your point of view, and classical feminism may well be out as far as the younger generation is concered, but speaking as a member of the older generation, it's still there among us and like I said earlier, it's our money going over the bar that's paying the wages.
Personaly I would rather have an audience member stay and remember us because they had a damn good time.
To a cirtain extent, the notion that there is no such thing as a bad publicity is true, but that's when a band is already famous. People see the massive amount of press that bad publicity brings famous personalities and it creates it's own version of noteriety. Out of all that press, only a small percentage actualy seek out the act in question out of curiousness, but because the press is so massive, that actualy amounts to a hell of a lot of people.
But things are much different on a local level, bad publicity there may be picked up by one local newspaper, possibly attracting a handfull of people but possibly also putting off a lot of other locals who might otherwise have checked you out at their local venue, but more importantly, bad publicity on a local level can affect the chances of the local venues booking you. Many smaller venues are notorious for staying well away from controversy (they can't afford to do otherwise) so as soon as they get the slightest whiff of bad publicity, even if they don't know the whole story, they're put off booking you.
At that level, when you are trying to break into the business, you can't afford to be losing bookings, especialy if you're hoping to make a profession out of it. On a local level, your reputation for being professional, easy to work with and a good draw is paramount.
Once you hit the big time, then you can start courting controversy and milking the publicity it brings.
#29
Quote by SlackerBabbath
and you know the kinda guys those shows attract, dirty old men.


Highwaytohell is 16.



Mmmmmm.... 16 y/o dancing girls.... mmmmmm


Just.... makes.... me.... feel..... icky....

But on a serious note... My wife would feel the same way as Slack's wife. (even if the girls weren't little jailbait queens... haha)

Demographics are huge. As much as highwaytohell's assessment of the female demographic probably does carry some merit, it probably does so with a teen female demographic. You know... the ones who stereotypically go after Johnny football hero who has his own car, but when they grow up, ultimately choose someone with an education and a chance for stable employment. Among the bar-going crowd - especially the 20-somethings ('cause the teenies out looking for hot female action are at dance clubs) - Slack's assessment is probably more on.

I can't even look at young girls anymore....People will think I'm some kind of pervert


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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Last edited by axemanchris at Mar 28, 2009,
#30
Quote by axemanchris
Highwaytohell is 16.

So really, in this particular case, it would be quite inappropriate.
Quote by axemanchris

But on a serious note... My wife would feel the same way as Slack's wife. (even if the girls weren't little jailbait queens... haha)

Demographics are huge. As much as highwaytohell's assessment of the female demographic probably does carry some merit, it probably does so with a teen female demographic. You know... the ones who stereotypically go after Johnny football hero who has his own car, but when they grow up, ultimately choose someone with an education and a chance for stable employment. Among the bar-going crowd - especially the 20-somethings ('cause the teenies out looking for hot female action are at dance clubs) - Slack's assessment is probably more on.

CT


Quote by axemanchris

identify this quote for a virtual UG dessert cookie
I can't even look at young girls anymore....People will think I'm some kind of pervert


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Is it chocolate chip?
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Mar 29, 2009,
#31
Quote by SlackerBabbath
huge post


Guns N' Roses had all sorts of strippers and naked woman on stage in their club days.
Axl Rose would even imitate having sex with one of the strippers to grab everyones attention
#32
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
Guns N' Roses had all sorts of strippers and naked woman on stage in their club days.
Axl Rose would even imitate having sex with one of the strippers to grab everyones attention


Yeah, in LA, but LA is fairly different to most local music scenes, besides, half of the original Guns 'n' Roses were from the L.A. Guns who were already pretty big news in the area, so they probably weren't playing very small venues.
#33
Quote by SlackerBabbath


Pursuit Of Happiness - 'I'm An Adult Now'


Is it chocolate chip?


HOLY!

A UK guy who knows TPOH!! For that.... you get TWO chocolate chip cookies!



My personal favourite line in that is:

Sometimes my head hurts and sometimes my stomach hurts and I guess it won't be long, Till I'm sitting in a room with a bunch of people whose necks and backs are aching; their sight and hearing's fading, Who just can't seem to get it up



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Mar 29, 2009,
#34
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Yeah, in LA, but LA is fairly different to most local music scenes, besides, half of the original Guns 'n' Roses were from the L.A. Guns who were already pretty big news in the area, so they probably weren't playing very small venues.


They played the standard locations like every other 80's LA band.
#35
Rule #1

Pussy sells

good idea as long as the chicks are hot and have great bodies
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#36
Quote by axemanchris
HOLY!

A UK guy who knows TPOH!! For that.... you get TWO chocolate chip cookies!


WOOHOO!
Quote by axemanchris

My personal favourite line in that is:

Sometimes my head hurts and sometimes my stomach hurts and I guess it won't be long, Till I'm sitting in a room with a bunch of people whose necks and backs are aching; their sight and hearing's fading, Who just can't seem to get it up



CT


That sounds like me now.

I dunno, when you're young and playing in a rock band, you tend to live by the addage 'Live fast, die young and have a damn good lookin' corpse!' but when you get to your 40s and it feels like you're in your 60s, it kinda changes to 'Please, just give me another 20 years!'
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
They played the standard locations like every other 80's LA band.

Yeah. all the 'standard' LA Sunset Strip venues, like the Whisky a Go Go for instance, a club well known for it's go-go dancers, or the Roxy with it's 'On the Rox' bar above the club (basicaly a room equipped with two stripper poles where people like Alice Cooper and Keith Moon used to go for 'debauchery') or how about Gazzarri's, where according to David Lee Roth in his book "Crazy From The Heat", Gazzarri lured young girls to his club office to have sex while Roth watched. It's interesting to note that in his 2007 autobiography, Slash states that when Guns 'n' Roses were just starting out and playing there regularly, the band despised what Gazzarri's was most noted for - pretty male performers who he felt focused too much on clothes, make-up and theatrics and far too little on the actual songs and musicianship.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Mar 29, 2009,
#37
dont do it. ppl will just come to see chicks and be distracted form the music
#38
Quite a bit of debate here!

it's actually all good stuff to know.
We live in a turbulent time where many different things are possible. My band already shocks the **** out of people for being a bunch of kids playing tight prog thrash that sounds like it was from the early 80s. alot of people really get taken by surprise by the whole "non-radio thing"- because most of the bands in our general scene that we play with are generally hardcore or indie. and all the non-metal guys. Sure you've got those few very good technical bands but otherwise... You guys can see where I'm coming from.

The girls I would get would be at least 18 (i know seniors) and adhere to a very intricate stage routine. We're still working on our theatrics and our marketting atm...
One problem I find is trying to apply certain marketting techniques and appeal things... but I have no fanbase to enact it upon. We're mostly playing some underground clubs now (we've sworn off those ****ty little teen clubs and only play serious venues with good sound guys- Sure you might say hey - that limits our exposure, but on the other hand, we want people to hear us with great sound and the right audiance).

I think we could do it, however, we'd have to do it right- like how hawkwind would do it or something.real DANCERs not strippers or whatever, someone who's movements work to the movement, and enrich the musical experience. Though for now that looks not to be an option...
#39
Quote by Highwaytohell


I think we could do it, however, we'd have to do it right- like how hawkwind would do it or something.real DANCERs not strippers or whatever, someone who's movements work to the movement, and enrich the musical experience. Though for now that looks not to be an option...


Do you mean Stacia? She was 6 foot 2 inches tall and weighed 14 stone, a real space cadet, who had too much LSD one night at a Hawkwind gig, jumped up onto the stage, took all her clothes off and started doing 'interpretive dance' to their music. After that, the band asked her to do it again and she ended up touring with them for a while.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Apr 2, 2009,
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