#1
I've been playing guitar/bass since I was 11 (I'm 22 now, figure it out) and I've yet to be able to execute mid song pickup switching or knob changing. I just can't do it consistently, flat out. Like, I can't ever go from one volume to other other midsong without over shooting it or (in the case of strats, at least) go to a pickup position on the switch that isn't 1 or 5.

I was wondering who here actually utilizes these tools and what advice you'd have.
Fact: Bears eat beats. Bears beats Battlestar Galactica.
#3
I use my pinky. It takes some getting used to playing with your pinky hanging out there like you're drinking tea but it's easy.
Yes, I'm from California, yes I like Hockey, no I do not like the Ducks, yes I like the Kings!
#4
There are some easy tricks like holding a note for sustain or using legatos to give yourself that extra time to make complicated control changes.Really,it's just experience and using them a lot.When I first started gigging I had trouble with it,but now it's fairly easy to switch pups or roll the knobs during a song.

WARNING!: THIS USER HAS BEEN KNOWN TO BE AN OPINIONATED ASS. ALWAYS USE CAUTION WHEN READING POSTS AND NEVER USE NEAR AN OPEN FLAME.USE ONLY AS DIRECTED.KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN.







#5
I have the same problem. 3-way and 2-way switches are the only things I can ever manage. 4- and 5-way switches never stop where I want them, and with knobs I always do too little at first then too much, and by the time I back it up I've missed a bar or two.

I've pretty much given up. I don't touch tone controls mid-song, I use pedals for volume boosts instead (leaving the guitar itself at maximum volume all the time, at least that way you're also not losing any responsiveness), and I change all switches in guitars I have to 3-way. It's the only way I can manage it.

How the **** anyone ever manages to even change pickups on a Fender Jaguar is beyond me.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#6
It's an absolute must for lots of guitarists, like Paul Gilbert for example. Lots of people with single channel amps as well need it to tidy up there tone. The best way to learn to execute it isn't going to be to know how much to move it exactly, but to listen. Listen while you're doing it, then you'll know when to stop for sure, then it's all just practicing doing that from there. As every guitar's volume sweep on the volume knob is differant, it all just comes down to knowing what it feels like/sounds like to stop moving the knob, even if it's really quickly.
I use my pinky finger, and roll my wrist into it, kinda like when I sweep pick, but I just raise the pick above the strings, or keep them lightly touching the strings so I know where I'm at.
As for pick-up switching on 5-way switches for example, I still suck at getting those to stop in positions 2, 3, and 4
Guess just gently I suppose, I'm just prone to smacking it into the neck position from the bridge for a solo that it just happens second nature for me.
Last edited by bowen at Mar 27, 2009,
#7
Quote by MrFlibble

How the **** anyone ever manages to even change pickups on a Fender Jaguar is beyond me.

magic, man... magic.

But, how do you handle the volume pedal, as well? Even midsong (when I had a volume pedal) I'd always over-shoot the volume pedal. I just can't understand how people do the control/pedal changes (past stomping and 3 way switches) while they're into the music. Like, I REALLY have to concentrate when I did volume swells with my volume pedal when I had one (I was told it looked very out of place, but sounded very cool but disconnected).

I don't know, it seems like WAY too much to keep track of. Maybe that's why I started like tele's over starts (3-way switch!)
Fact: Bears eat beats. Bears beats Battlestar Galactica.
#8
I had a volume pedal where you could set a maximum/minimum range, so as long as I planned ahead there was no risk of me overshooting. It was still a bit hard to get a perfectly smooth volume gradient but you do just get used to not slamming your foot down so fast. It helps I use wah pedals a lot as well, I'm very used to that kind of pedal.

Though my playing has changed a bit and I don't do volume swells or fade outs at all now so I just have an EQ pedal set as a direct lead boost. It's a cheap cop-out but so convenient and stress-free...
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#9
Quote by MrFlibble
I had a volume pedal where you could set a maximum/minimum range, so as long as I planned ahead there was no risk of me overshooting. It was still a bit hard to get a perfectly smooth volume gradient but you do just get used to not slamming your foot down so fast. It helps I use wah pedals a lot as well, I'm very used to that kind of pedal.

Though my playing has changed a bit and I don't do volume swells or fade outs at all now so I just have an EQ pedal set as a direct lead boost. It's a cheap cop-out but so convenient and stress-free...

yeah, the only song I've ever played that utilized a wah that wasn't my own concoction was "Voodoo Child" and that was a short lived endeavor.

maybe I should just stick to one tone per song, but I'd still like to hear the ideas and techniques. With practice, maybe I could learn to utilize a volume pedal from "rhythm" to "lead."
Fact: Bears eat beats. Bears beats Battlestar Galactica.
#11
My switch is in an easy to reach place. right under my two volume knobs ( the only two knobs that are on my guitar).

this can be bad though, cause I set the neck to clean and the bridge to dirty (one rolled off) and I might bump the neck knob and screw it up. I usually switch a few times so I've gotten used to it. I also have to practice for when I don't or can't use a distortion pedal. Other than that I find it quite easy. I switch oickups ALOT during songs that I play.....
BACK LIKE A HEART ATTACK
#12
Sorry to be a bit radical, but you do it like every other aspect of guitar playing: by practicing!

PROTIP: I like to hold both sides of a pup switch when shifting, if possible.
#13
It's easy on a les paul imo, what I will typically do is turn the volume/gain up and play mostly with my guitar's volume at 6-7 and roll it up all the way up for a lead tone and roll it down for clean tones. Idk, I've just gotten really used to using it and I can do it pretty effectively on the spot these days.
#14
I know this won't work if you're playing chords or anything like that but I play/sing sometimes in my band and I can usually switch stuff by hammering part of a riff for a second while I fiddle with the switches and what not. Most of the switching is just during solo sections or between clean/distorted parts so it is easier but there are the occasional switches or volume adjustments in the middle of a riff.

Pretty much if I can sing, play, and fiddle with knobs you can too just practice...it did take forever to get comfortable enough to do that though, but that's what band practice 5 days a week does for you.
SPAM
Stock Gibson Pickups from a 2005 V, I think they're a 498T and 500T set FS/FT
Duncan Distortion (regular spaced) FS

Looking for: an acoustic, recording gear, or $
#16
Quote by MrFlibble
How the **** anyone ever manages to even change pickups on a Fender Jaguar is beyond me.

that was my reason for choosing the Jazzmaster over the Jaguar.

I struggle with these things but it's something i'm getting used to. I'm finding the rhythm/lead circuitry useful on my jazzmaster for giving me the option to effectively roll the tone back to the desired level without having to physically roll back the tone knob, when i'm trying to get my guitar to sit in the mix rather than cut through. I've always found flicking a switch much easier than turning a knob. Maybe the gretsch tone switch system isn't as useless as i previously thought.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.