#1
If you are playing open chords, (e.g. G, C, AM, G) how do you change to each chord without, for a fraction of a second, hearing the open string notes as you take your fingers off to make the new chord? I mean, I've tried muting with my picking hand, but often it sounds unnatural and the chords and rhythm sound disrupted and too staccato, hence I don't really want to do that.

So how do you change chords smoothly (without breaking the rhythm or shortening the 'ring' of the chord by muting) in a way which avoids unwanted sounds or the open string notes being played?
#2
You practice add get better at it - that's all there is to it.

Just make sure you focus on playing accurately and cleanly...don't "try" to play fast.
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#3
Practice, practice, practice.

When I learn a new song, it usually takes a while to change the chords quickly and cleanly - The first few dozen attempts invariably have the occasional 'comedy' chord change.

Try doing it slowly at first, you'll soon get used to it and you're fingers will start snapping into position automatically after a while.
#4
But how are you supposed to change though? Are you meant to deaden the strings with the picking hand, or should you let the open strings ring? Or is it the case that when you get good enough, none of these are necessary and you just manage to change chords without any unwanted sounds? I'm confused about what you're supposed to do.
#5
practice slowly. if you try and change chords quickly and see yourself struggling, and continue to practice that way you really wont get better, your muscle memory will just remember the sloppy crap. so just take it slow and it will come naturally
#6
I don't think deadening the strings with your picking hand is the answer to your problem without causing other potential problems along with it like palm muting the chord too soon. There's really nothing you can do about it, but like stated earlier once the chord progression of the song becomes easier and faster you'll hardly notice the open strings because the fingering of the next chord will mute them.

Now, let's say you're going from an E to an A chord (or any chord that doesn't use the low E string). I personally use my thumb to mute the E string as I strum the next chord. The problem I have with that is that I sometimes forget to un-mute it when I go back to play another E chord.

I think the main thing here is that once you accept the fact that there's nothing you can actually "do" to fix it, the sooner you can get past it and progress with your playing. Good luck and God bless!
Last edited by kdiehls at Mar 27, 2009,
#7
Quote by kdiehls
I think the main thing here is that once you accept the fact that there's nothing you can actually "do" to fix it, the sooner you can get past it and progress with your playing.


This is correct, IMHO. I've never felt that hearing that brief moment of open strings somehow is incorrect. But there is a degree to this statement. If you can't change chords without biting your lip and doing some other funky stuff, you should practice more (not saying this is what you are doing, just saying).
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