#1
i have been working on my ear training and i got some of those ear training programs and i have gotten pretty good at them. but when i try to listen to songs and play by ear i am not able to do it so well, so what should my next step be in developing my ear training?
#3
certain rock music can be hard to play by ear because of effects, multi-track guitar parts, tons of distortion, etc. if you want to get better at playing by ear start with something with a "cleaner" sound like acoustic, blues and piano-based rock (generally has less distortion...coldplay is an exception)
#4
Hello, Are you training for relative pitch?

Relative pitch training is the best for transcribing songs.

You can use your knowledge of intervals to discern and identify which notes, chords, progression in relation to the tonal center.

Perfect pitch is hearing the actual note and identifying it without any reference.
#5
Relative pitch, in my opinion (well, i'm thinking it's fact), is MUCH easier to train than Perfect Pitch. I can identify certain invervals much better than an A note, and I can sing an A note from tuning, but a Perfect fifth is easier to identify than a played C and a G note.

Relative pitch is great for transcriptions, as said by jsantos, but also for improvisation, when you hear good licks and by using relative pitch with a good fretboard knowledge, you'll be shining like gold.

And if it's too hard, don't quit. It IS hard.

One of the sites I use to train for relative pitch is trainear.com. Try it!
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#6
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i have been working on my ear training and i got some of those ear training programs and i have gotten pretty good at them. but when i try to listen to songs and play by ear i am not able to do it so well, so what should my next step be in developing my ear training?



learn more songs by ear.

train your ear by learning actual music.

an ear training programs is fine and all, but don't rely on that alone. You need some context.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 27, 2009,
#7
I was actually just gonna post about this so I will do it here.

Another program that you might want to look into is called gnu solfege. It's free ear training software.

http://www.solfege.org/

I always feel like I am just guessing when I try and do ear training. Is that how it's supposed to be? Anybody with more experience have some insight into the mystery of ear training?
#8
It will come in time, just keep practicing. Also, the most important skill of playing guitar (well in my opinion anyway) is to be able to play what you hear. A few exercises to do this would be first to sing a solo and play what you sing back (easier over a backing track or progression). After you get good at that, you can start doing them at the same time by singing your solos while you are playing them. Look at most of the big blues guys and watch their mouths as they are playing and you can see what I'm talking about.

Being able to do this will take your playing to the next level and instantly start making your solos melodic as opposed to sounding like scales or straight licks.
#9
combine learning actual songs by ear (vocal melodies are a great place to start, particularly pop, broadway and or melodic--where the singer is actually singing-- rock vocal melodies) with a good ear training program (includes dictation, sightsinging, chord quality identification and solfege). I use the books Ear Traning for the Contemporary Musician (Berklee Press) for solfege and sightsinging and Jazz Ear Training by Jamey Aebersold for dictation and interval work, as well as the interval identification tool at musictheory.net. Ear training takes a while but it is probobly the most important thing you can practice as a musician.
EDIT: Also, when practicing scales keep it basic (major and minor) and vocalize with them, preferably singing the solfege syllable. This is extremely valuable both for knowledge of your instrument and training your ear.
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Mar 28, 2009,
#10
I learn the vocal melodies on the guitar, and then it is easier to figure out the song by ear because like 90% of the time, the vocal melody contains some of the notes used in the actually song (well for rock music atleast).
#11
@above
yeah thats true, but for learning the rest its also important to learn how to hear basslines (as thats where you'll find out the most about the chord progression), but as far as training your ears intervallicaly, vocal melodies are the best way to start out being that their the easiest to hear.