#2
A harmony with one guitar is pretty much a chord.

Think about it. A chord is playing several notes at the same time to create a sound that you would know as a guitarist. Therefore, if you played harmonic notes (as in harmonies, not squeels) with just one guitar, it would be some form of a chord.

That is why you need more than one instrument.
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#3
you'd have to do it tastefully, but it could be done.

if the bass is playing a similar line, just harmonize with that. don't do it too much though, just every now and then for a few seconds.
#4
Quote by tmfiore
A harmony with one guitar is pretty much a chord.

Think about it. A chord is playing several notes at the same time to create a sound that you would know as a guitarist. Therefore, if you played harmonic notes (as in harmonies, not squeels) with just one guitar, it would be some form of a chord.

That is why you need more than one instrument.

what the **** is this even supposed to mean
of course you can apply harmony to a single guitar
Last edited by ilikebebop at Mar 27, 2009,
#6
harmony is multiple notes sounding at the same time, melody is 1 note at a time.

Implying harmony is using melody and/or harmony to outline the progression.

IF you mean like harmonising riffs, then it's best to play 2 tracks if with distortion, or else it will turn into a dissonant mess.

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