#1
Anyone have tips for memorizing where notes are on the fretboard?
Gear:
Agile Ash RB 828
Schecter C-7 (old 90s style headstock)
Handbuilt 6-string V
Handbuilt Baritone scale 6 string Iceman-copy
Pod HD300
#2
for me, its not about memorizing notes, rather being able to move scale shapes all over, and remembering which notes are in each scale. the notes-on-the-entire-fretboard thing developed, for me, from that
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#4
Can't. 28.8 kbps dial up v_v
Gear:
Agile Ash RB 828
Schecter C-7 (old 90s style headstock)
Handbuilt 6-string V
Handbuilt Baritone scale 6 string Iceman-copy
Pod HD300
#6
Ha, i'm sigged.

Practice how, though? Just stare at the fretboard?
Gear:
Agile Ash RB 828
Schecter C-7 (old 90s style headstock)
Handbuilt 6-string V
Handbuilt Baritone scale 6 string Iceman-copy
Pod HD300
#7
Quote by Jango22
Anyone have tips for memorizing where notes are on the fretboard?


Learn to read in all positions.

* not a shortcut, but a thorough way of learning the notes in a meaningful context.
shred is gaudy music
#9
know your chromatic scale
then as you play you will see how the notes on the fretboard fit together exactly as in the chromatic scale and you will then just memorize through practice
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#10
I know how to write music, but it's kinda hard to translate notes on a staff to the fretboard.
Gear:
Agile Ash RB 828
Schecter C-7 (old 90s style headstock)
Handbuilt 6-string V
Handbuilt Baritone scale 6 string Iceman-copy
Pod HD300
#11
I know the open notes, 5th fret notes, 12th fret notes, and 17th fret notes XD
I know the chromatic scale, I just wanna be able to look at a certain fret/string and know what it is.
Gear:
Agile Ash RB 828
Schecter C-7 (old 90s style headstock)
Handbuilt 6-string V
Handbuilt Baritone scale 6 string Iceman-copy
Pod HD300
#12
Ok, rules for learning notes.

Notes repeat after an octave (12 semitones) - so first fret = 13th, etc.

Notes can be moved across strings by moving up a string and down 5 frets (4 frets between G and B strings)

Notes on low and high E strings are the same.

You only need to learn the natural notes at first - CDEFGBA. Everything else is X# or Xb, a fret up or down respectively from the natural note "X".

Make sense?
#13
Yeah, I knew all that.
Gear:
Agile Ash RB 828
Schecter C-7 (old 90s style headstock)
Handbuilt 6-string V
Handbuilt Baritone scale 6 string Iceman-copy
Pod HD300
#14
i would suggest practicing intervals, like if you were ear training. it will help you to understand the relationship between the notes on the fret like if you jump up 4 frets from a fret what interval will that be? that sort of thing
#15
There are two things that helped me memorize my fretboard. First, using octaves as a way to figure out the spots that I am unsure of. Using the many octave shapes across the neck you can quickly find what the note is. So I would call out a note and play every one of that note on the fretboard going up and then back down.

Second, start practicing your sight reading (notation not tabs). This will really help you get used to all of the notes on the fretboard. I used to take a jazz melody and run it in every spot I could on the fretboard and I had it mastered in little time. This would be my more recommended way to learn out of the two
#16
um well,
play in the key of C and go up the scale on each individual string, (you know e-f and b-c is one fret apart yeah?) then in between are the sharps and flats blah blah...
1). you should try and tell yourself what notes you are playing while playing a riff and i don't mean shouting out E F B E F C at 220 bpm while playing master of puppets i mean, "oh this note here he plays a C then he hammers on to the D and pulls off to an A" that kinda stuff
2). at the seventh fret you can tell the note your playing by the string above it (except for the low E of course) e.g you play the 7th fret on the A string, the the string above it (open) is E so you have a E on the 7th fret of the a string

i don't know if you understand, because my way of explaining things is horrible but give it a crack
#17
A suggestion: Take 10-30 minutes of your practice time, slow down what you are playing, and don't play any notes you don't know the name of. Say the names out loud and if you are stuck, stop and figure it out. Start down low on the neck, and work up slowly and if you dedicate yourself to the task within 3-6 months you will wonder why it took you so long to get around to this fundamental skill.
#18
Quote by t.k. gardner
A suggestion: Take 10-30 minutes of your practice time, slow down what you are playing, and don't play any notes you don't know the name of. Say the names out loud and if you are stuck, stop and figure it out. Start down low on the neck, and work up slowly and if you dedicate yourself to the task within 3-6 months you will wonder why it took you so long to get around to this fundamental skill.



Take this advice, it's absolutely spot on!
#19
Quote by Jango22
Yeah, I knew all that.


Great! Then learn all the notes on the low E string. Learn them so well that you can name them without thought.

Then use those methods to figure out the high E, then the D, then everything else becomes pretty simple.
#20
<_< The only thing I think of when I see your name is ROW ROW FIGHT THE POWAH!

Hm. I guess it seemed harder than it really is XD
Gear:
Agile Ash RB 828
Schecter C-7 (old 90s style headstock)
Handbuilt 6-string V
Handbuilt Baritone scale 6 string Iceman-copy
Pod HD300
#21
Quote by mr. cool
i would suggest practicing intervals, like if you were ear training. it will help you to understand the relationship between the notes on the fret like if you jump up 4 frets from a fret what interval will that be? that sort of thing


Also, learning to play basic chords in different positions all over the fretboard, knowing the intervals included in the chord (1 3 5 for Major, 1 b3 5 for Minor, etc.), and where they sit in whichever inversion you happen to be playing.
#22
When I practice a scale I like to go through the circle of 5ths. So I'll play an F minor pentatonic, then C Minor, then G Minor, etc of the same pattern. This has helped me learn the E and A strings really well.
#23
haha i just made a thread today about how i'm using an old guitar i have and carved the notes into it right behind the string to help me memorize the fretboard better :P
#24
The way I went about learning it is to play through the C major scale starting on the 8th fret low E string. Then once you get back to the C go to F 13th fret and play the F Major scale. Continue through the cycle of 4th's: C F Bb Eb Ab Db Gb B E A D G C. Figure out the individual notes of every scale as go through them and say them aloud. I memorized the fretboard very quickly.