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#1
When you pour out a glass of water, what comes out first...the first of the water that was initially put into the cup or the most recent water that was put into the cup?

I know this is a weird question but it's something I have to answer for a science class and I really have no idea.
#2
Water doesn't separate itself from other water.
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#3
it's a mixture, just watch it next time you pour.
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#4
its a trick question i think, cause all the molecules are bouncing off eachother its all distributed theres a fancy science word for it but i forget

like if you drop food coloring into a still glass of water it will eventually turn the whole thing green without stiring
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#5
water is one thing. there cannot be a first or last. becuase when put into any container it becomes one whole. only when forced into seperate pieces with it be seperate pieces.


i think....


EDIT: keep in mind i dropped out.
#6
wow.


you cant tell, it is a hetero homo solution. if you take a sample from the body, it is the same composition as the whole, thus you can not tell which molecules where poured into the glass first.

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Last edited by Skierinanutshel at Mar 27, 2009,
#7
homogeneous solution
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#8
mix one part of the water with food coloring, (doesn't matter which,) than pour the water into the cup and observe the food coloring to see the water patterns.

If this doesn't answer your question than PM me, and i'll make it more specific.
#9
Quote by Skierinanutshel
wow.


you cant tell, it is a hetero solution. if you take a sample from the body, it is the same composition as the whole, thus you can not tell which molecules where poured into the glass first.


this except replace hetero with homogeneous.
#10
well which part is the highest temperature? The part with the highest temperature would come out first because is would have risen to the top because is was heated up and its particles would be less dense.
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#11
Well... that isn't really answerable... particles in a fluid aren't constrained to a single position so you can't ever say that the water that comes out of the cup first was the water that was put in the cup last.
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#12
Quote by Misanthrope01
its a trick question i think, cause all the molecules are bouncing off eachother its all distributed theres a fancy science word for it but i forget

like if you drop food coloring into a still glass of water it will eventually turn the whole thing green without stiring

Exactly, take some water, take some other water with foodcoloring, and pour the foodcoloring into the other water and then dump it
Its gonna mix, because water has the same density as itself
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#13
when you pour, the water 'bounces off the edges' of the cup, and it will naturally mix. (mechanical)
still water will mix itself, especially if it is hot. this is due to water being a liquid state, where molecules are free to move, so they do bounce off each other (chemical)
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#14
the molecules are all bouncing off each other....so the water all gets equally distributed
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#16
Quote by evhaustin5150
well which part is the highest temperature? The part with the highest temperature would come out first because is would have risen to the top because is was heated up and its particles would be less dense.


I'd go with this as well.
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#17
Quote by Misanthrope01
its a trick question i think, cause all the molecules are bouncing off eachother its all distributed theres a fancy science word for it but i forget

like if you drop food coloring into a still glass of water it will eventually turn the whole thing green without stiring



It's called diffusion.
#20
Well, as you pour the water into another glass you're introducing work and forcing the molecules to move around. The water that lands in the glass first gets moved around the most and therefore would be a very, very slightly higher temperature than the water that lands in the glass last. This water would then settle at the top due to being slightly less dense than the cooler water with less work being done on it and be poured out first.

Either that or it really doesn't matter either way because it all mixes.


#21
A mix of both.

Water is a fluid, it doesn't separate itself that distinctly. It's in constant motion, and all the molecules are constantly being moved around, so everything get's dispersed evenly.
#22
my jizz cums first.
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#23
Quote by Snake_42
Well, as you pour the water into another glass you're introducing work and forcing the molecules to move around. The water that lands in the glass first gets moved around the most and therefore would be a very, very slightly higher temperature than the water that lands in the glass last. This water would then settle at the top due to being slightly less dense than the cooler water with less work being done on it and be poured out first.

Either that or it really doesn't matter either way because it all mixes.




as much as this makes sense p-chem wise, through experimental process you would find this to not be true. yes, the initially poured water will have a slightly (if ever so) higer temperature which will lower the density slight (again, if ever so much) which would allow for those molecules to rise in the liquid, but you would find that will rising to the top, the energy gained from the glass-water friction will quickly return to the entire water-water system allowing for an equal temperature/density of all of the water poured into the glass, so no "by density" separation will be sustained long enough so that you can tell which molecules were poured first, and the others last.

lastly, if you take the initial glass-water friction into account to raise the temperature, you must also take into account the water-water friction as well, again making the density claim a moot point.
#24
If its had time to settle it'll be which ever is warmer. Cold water and warm water don't mix so cold water tends to sink down. But really, in a cup it's not going to make much difference because the temperature difference is going to be pretty damn slight.
#25
Quote by Misanthrope01
its a trick question i think, cause all the molecules are bouncing off eachother its all distributed theres a fancy science word for it but i forget

like if you drop food coloring into a still glass of water it will eventually turn the whole thing green without stiring
Dissipation is the word, maybe?
#26
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Water doesn't separate itself from other water.



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#28
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Water doesn't separate itself from other water.



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#29
You can't tell. There are convection currents in the water, so it depends when it is that you pour it.
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#30
Quote by rabidguitarist
You can't tell. There are convection currents in the water, so it depends when it is that you pour it.


Only if there is a temperature difference (the bottom is being heated or top is being cooled).

It is just straight up diffusion in addition to the mixing that occurs when you pour it in.
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#31
You won't even have the same molecules of water that you started off with, and give the number of atoms and stuff in a glass of water, it's unlikely and almost impossible that you'll ever get the exact configuration that you poured in.

Water is in a constant equilibrium situation between water molecules and hydronium/hydroxide ions, so molecules are constantly breaking up to form the ions while other ions are constantly combining to make the molecule. You probably won't ever get the same ions coming together ever again.
#32
only if the waters were somehow different concentrations or temperatures (such as in the sea) would they separate and be poured out at separate times
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#33
i don't think water diffuses with itself, when you put food coloring or something like that in it the coloring particles are spreading away from each other but the water doesnt, it sounds like a trick question.
#34
Is this of any use to know at all? Seriously.
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#35
Quote by gm jack
Only if there is a temperature difference (the bottom is being heated or top is being cooled).

It is just straight up diffusion in addition to the mixing that occurs when you pour it in.

You could only say that there are no currents if the whole thing was completely theoretical, and the air in the room is completely still, all of the water is the same temperature, there are no air or convection currents in the air, etc etc etc.
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#37
Quote by Skierinanutshel
it is called physical chemistry. its a bad, ass subject.

Fixed.
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#39
Quote by gm jack
Only if there is a temperature difference (the bottom is being heated or top is being cooled).

It is just straight up diffusion in addition to the mixing that occurs when you pour it in.


There's always going to be differences in temperature between the particles, so therefore there will always be convection of some kind.
Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution
#40
try adding food coloring to one half of the water then add the other half without disturbing it somehow, then you'll find out I think it's probably the water at the top.
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