#1
Hello people, i've fiddled with the C# natural minor scale over the song 'Mary Lou' (Acoustic version) by Sonata Arctica. It sounded.. well, not really nice. Here, take a listen (feel free to take it down if it is illegal to upload songs having solo's tacked on):

Click to listen/download (It's hosted on mediafire)

To play that 'solo' (if you want to call it a solo), i have just jumped around the C# natural minor scale, sometimes switching to an octave higher. What do i need to do to get a real solo out of it? Lead playing, not just some notes played in succession in the C# natural minor scale? Do i need to switch the root note of the scale along with the chords in the song? Do i need to add more breaks?

Thanks for the help, UG.
Last edited by robinlint at Mar 28, 2009,
#2
try altering phrasing and adding fast and slow sequences, also a bend in the right place can make a huge difference. also take the time to learn the scale all the way up in boxes, that way you can have a lot more variety and also incorporate sliding into the soloing to which i don't see many do. I'm not the best player but I find that this stuff has helped me out a lot
#3
Thanks ESP Axes Man. But what do you mean with 'learn the scale all the way up in boxes'?
#6
I'll have a look at it, thanks.

P.S: The music theory video lessons have been a great help. Thanks!
Last edited by robinlint at Mar 28, 2009,
#8
Here's some advice after listening to the whole thing:

1. Part of the reason it "doesn't sound good" is because you are very definitely out of tune. Tuning accurately can make a world of difference.

2. Every run seems to be the same. It's a very straight sequence of picked notes just going straight up or down. To fix this, firstly add some legato in there to provide a different sound, and try to think in terms of more interesting intervals -- skip around a bit, emphasize chord tones and bring the playing into a higher register. Also, slides, bends and vibrato as per the suggestions above would help immensely as well, they're very useful phrasing techniques.

3. You spend a whole lot of time hanging around on C#. Based on the progression, sit on different tones -- the thirds and fifths of chords to be safe, or try some more dissonant tones to give a suspension-resolution feel.

4. You'd be surprised how much switching to the clean channel somewhere in there would give you a different feel, especially since it's an acoustic backing. Go to the clean channel for a bit, maybe on a verse or something, and experiment with some fingerstyle pedal-point licks, dyads and chords.

The playing's not bad per se, just needs some variety.
#9
Quote by :-D
Here's some advice after listening to the whole thing:

1. Part of the reason it "doesn't sound good" is because you are very definitely out of tune. Tuning accurately can make a world of difference.

2. Every run seems to be the same. It's a very straight sequence of picked notes just going straight up or down. To fix this, firstly add some legato in there to provide a different sound, and try to think in terms of more interesting intervals -- skip around a bit, emphasize chord tones and bring the playing into a higher register. Also, slides, bends and vibrato as per the suggestions above would help immensely as well, they're very useful phrasing techniques.

3. You spend a whole lot of time hanging around on C#. Based on the progression, sit on different tones -- the thirds and fifths of chords to be safe, or try some more dissonant tones to give a suspension-resolution feel.

4. You'd be surprised how much switching to the clean channel somewhere in there would give you a different feel, especially since it's an acoustic backing. Go to the clean channel for a bit, maybe on a verse or something, and experiment with some fingerstyle pedal-point licks, dyads and chords.

The playing's not bad per se, just needs some variety.

Thanks . What does the term 'phrasing' mean, though?
#10
Quote by robinlint
Thanks . What does the term 'phrasing' mean, though?

It's actually fairly difficult to pin an exact definition, but basically it just means how you play what you play. For example, the rhythm you play is one of the key parts of your phrasing, as are dynamics and note choice.