#1
Hi, what are the most common keys in modern music? Also, obviously apart from major/minor does each key have noticeable moods that make it identifiable? For example eminor is heavy, gmajor the happiest sort of thing?
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#3
I find that funny. fyi e minor and g major are the same thing


E minor is the relative minor or G major. Same key signature, but not the same thing.

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#4
Yeah I know thats exactly what I meant. Same notes just starting in a different place.
#5
well the mood thing between relative major and minor scales depends on the chords. Em is used in most heavy music which makes it sound different.
Another good one is that C major is a happy sounding one but the relative Am is very sad sounding when you play chords.
For non relative scales it probably depends on the notes you play, I love D major and A major
I think A maj can sound sad too listen to Orion by Metallica for proof
#6
yeah it does sound sad, but its uplifting
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#7
Quote by DerAj2
Yeah I know thats exactly what I meant. Same notes just starting in a different place.



wrong again. lol

same amount of sharps, different notes.
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#8
Quote by DerAj2
Yeah I know thats exactly what I meant. Same notes just starting in a different place.


The actual scale has the same notes, but there are very different chords that go along with each one that makes them sound completely different.

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#9
funny... actually i think the two most commonly written in keys are G and Em..


in rock today that is..


maybe C and G over all..


G, Em, A, D, C, Bb? <-- most used?
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#10
No, they definitely have the same notes, they just play a different role in the key. For example, the A is the 2nd, or supertonic, tone of G major, while it is the 4th, or subdominant, of E minor.

I would say the most commonly used keys in classic and 80s rock are:

-G major. Who hasn't heard the G-C-D progression at least 8,125 times in their life now? Besides that, the first song at least 60% of guitarists learn to solo over is Every Rose Has Its Thorn. It's one of the easiest solos, yet sounds amazing. Kockin' On Heaven's Door is also in G major, but the song is played half a step down.

-A minor (mostly pentatonic). The first scale 99% of guitarists learn to apply nowadays is A minor pentatonic. Just about 99.9% of online lessons about the pentatonic scale are taught in A minor. It's a pretty neutral hand position, plus there are no sharps or flats.

-E minor (or Eb minor, Eb tuning is common for a lot of 80s bands). The ideal key for the guitar IMO. Not only are all open strings in key, the bass-iest note on the guitar (open E) is also the tonal center of the key. It gives you the opportunity the darkest tone because you can heavily use the open E in your riffs and licks. Think "Whole Lotta Love" by Led Zeppelin. Plus, it's so easy to get coordinated with for beginners.

-F# minor is somewhat common in shred. You hear Batio using the open E string a lot but still reverting back to the F# as the tonal center. "Scarified" by Racer X is in F# minor. It gives you one note below the tonic center to use as a bass note. You canwrite some cool riffs in this key.
#11
The most commonly used keys are the major keys that work the best with the open strings of the most common tunings. So, C, G, D, and A.
#12
I don't see keys as having moods myself. I will admit I prefer some over others, but that isn,t because one is sadder then the other. Over all I have no idea what keys are used the most in music, I have seen so many songs in different keys. I would guess some sort of Major key.
#13
Quote by DerAj2
Yeah I know thats exactly what I meant. Same notes just starting in a different place.
Different tonal centers, meaning they resolve to different notes. This is usually forced by using some accidentals.

Also, obviously apart from major/minor does each key have noticeable moods that make it identifiable?
Different keys don't have special moods. In a modern world, d major does not sound happier than c major. Although, 400 years ago before equal temperment, the only key on a harpsichord (think medieval piano) that was perfectly in tune was c major, every other key was slightly out of tune. So different keys actually did sound different. Nowaday, because of equal temperement, all keys sound the same and are all as out of tune as any other key, they're all equally out of tune.

Hi, what are the most common keys in modern music?
C major is the most common in pop music, closely followed by G major and D major. In rock (and most sub genres), E minor and E major are very popular. In jazz, most songs are in Bb or Eb or F. Alot of old, guitar based blues songs are in Emajor, whereas alot of big band blues stuff is in Bb.
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#14
Quote by philipp122
No, they definitely have the same notes, they just play a different role in the key. For example, the A is the 2nd, or supertonic, tone of G major, while it is the 4th, or subdominant, of E minor.

I would say the most commonly used keys in classic and 80s rock are:

-G major. Who hasn't heard the G-C-D progression at least 8,125 times in their life now? Besides that, the first song at least 60% of guitarists learn to solo over is Every Rose Has Its Thorn. It's one of the easiest solos, yet sounds amazing. Kockin' On Heaven's Door is also in G major, but the song is played half a step down.

-A minor (mostly pentatonic). The first scale 99% of guitarists learn to apply nowadays is A minor pentatonic. Just about 99.9% of online lessons about the pentatonic scale are taught in A minor. It's a pretty neutral hand position, plus there are no sharps or flats.

-E minor (or Eb minor, Eb tuning is common for a lot of 80s bands). The ideal key for the guitar IMO. Not only are all open strings in key, the bass-iest note on the guitar (open E) is also the tonal center of the key. It gives you the opportunity the darkest tone because you can heavily use the open E in your riffs and licks. Think "Whole Lotta Love" by Led Zeppelin. Plus, it's so easy to get coordinated with for beginners.

-F# minor is somewhat common in shred. You hear Batio using the open E string a lot but still reverting back to the F# as the tonal center. "Scarified" by Racer X is in F# minor. It gives you one note below the tonic center to use as a bass note. You canwrite some cool riffs in this key.


thank you
#15
Quote by demonofthenight

Different keys don't have special moods. In a modern world, d major does not sound happier than c major. Although, 400 years ago before equal temperment, the only key on a harpsichord (think medieval piano) that was perfectly in tune was c major, every other key was slightly out of tune. So different keys actually did sound different. Nowaday, because of equal temperement, all keys sound the same and are all as out of tune as any other key, they're all equally out of tune.

Even with a single key to worry about you still can't get all the notes in tune because the ideal ratios for the different intervals conflict.

You can either choose to get all the 4ths and 5ths perfect and consistent (which would leave some 3rds and 6ths too big and some too small) or you could get the 3rds and 6ths perfect and conistent (which similarly, would mess up you 4ths and 5ths).

It would be more in tune than our current tuning system because in 12TET no interval is at its perfect ratio but all the ratios for specific intervals are the same because the semitone is a set ratio.

You made good points though. As you said, because in 12TET a semitone is standard there are no different inherent moods in different major or minor scales.
#17
Before maybe, but now what with equal temperament like demon mentioned, different keys are used for entirely utilitarian purposes. People choose keys based on what's convenient to play on the instrument or what their vocal range is. For instance, Christian worship music stereotypically is written in G major because of how ridiculously easy it is to drone over G Cadd9 for extended periods of time. And if you try telling Andy McKee to play his songs a half step up bring some food for the wait if he's using his harp guitar thing. Ask most harmonica players to play an Ab blues instead of a G blues and they're absolutely screwed, because they've got their harmonicas tuned to one particular key and most harmonica players don't learn to play outside of it. On the other hand he might not be so screwed because lots of harmonica players carry around several harmonica to compensate. I happen to be a baritone-bass as far as vocal range goes, and I very much like Isn't She Lovely by Stevie Wonder. Hell no, that man sings it in E, so the bulk of the melody is in the G#4-B4 range(really high). So I've taken the liberty of singing it either in Ab or G, the better part of an octave down, so I don't necessarily sound like I'm dying.
#18
The most used keys depend entirely on the construction of the instrument. A lot of wind instruments (Trumpet, trombone, saxophones, etc...) tend to be written for in Bb, F, and Eb, due directly due to their tuning.

C major is considered the most common key, based entirely off off the layout of the keys on the piano. It's all white notes, its easiest.

That said, I believe the guitar predisposes itself particularly well to G major and it's relative minor E minor due to it's tuning. It's tuned to every other note of the E minor pentatonic scale, from which one can derive only two proper triads- E minor and G major. DIG?
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I just learn the formula, apply it to a key, and use said notes on fretboard. Why? Cuz I'm not a pussy.
#19
Yeah, rock music tends to be in Am,Em,G basically easy keys yet Jazz pieces might use use a key signature with like 7#'s or b's. Bb and F common/favourited keys with wind player where as concert pitch instruments tend to prefer Cmaj/Am. Ages ago in renaissance times they didn't use scales at all they used modes instead, and they all have a specific sound to tell them apart (more so then scales do, imho).