#1
I'm still quite confused about what constitutes a blues key as being major or minor.

For example, the scale most people learn for blues is the pentatonic MINOR scale, and when you add the flat 5th you get the blues scale right? But is that the blues MINOR scale? Then, when someone says this blues track is in E, is E pentatonic minor a good way to solo over it? If not, then what do you do if the blues track is in E minor?

Lastly, the key sig of this attached blues song is E major, yet there's naturals and sharps all over it. Plus I see the E pentatonic minor or blues scale (above conundrum) in it. So what the hell is it?

Plus the little walk down in the intro uses both G# and G which don't fit into any scale? Yet it sounds good?
Attachments:
SoloBlues1.pdf
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Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#2
The cool thing about a blues progression is that its so simple, you can use basically any sound over it and as long as you know how to develop it, itll still sound good.

All the chords in a blues progression are major (unless you start adding ii-V's and such), but the blues scale (which is always minor) and the the pentatonic minor scale work fine over it. In blues, when they say its in E, you can more or less play anything as long as it resolves to E
#3
Adding to that, the G#-G in the intro is just a chromatic run, but you'll notice that it features both the 3 and b3 of E major (of course, the G is 3 in E minor). It's a common technique in blues to alternate the thirds like that.
#4
Quote by :-D
Adding to that, the G#-G in the intro is just a chromatic run, but you'll notice that it features both the 3 and b3 of E major (of course, the G is 3 in E minor). It's a common technique in blues to alternate the thirds like that.


Its also common in funk, particularly doing hammer ons between the two
#5
Quote by tubatom868686
Its also common in funk, particularly doing hammer ons between the two

Yes indeed, and with good reason, it sounds pretty damn cool.
#6
Quote by tubatom868686
The cool thing about a blues progression is that its so simple, you can use basically any sound over it and as long as you know how to develop it, itll still sound good.

All the chords in a blues progression are major (unless you start adding ii-V's and such), but the blues scale (which is always minor) and the the pentatonic minor scale work fine over it. In blues, when they say its in E, you can more or less play anything as long as it resolves to E


So you you're saying that apart from the chord changes, the blues itself has no real "major" or "minor" quality, you can just use different positions of the pentatonic/blues scale as long as you hit the right notes over the right chords?
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#7
Quote by mlfarrell
So you you're saying that apart from the chord changes, the blues itself has no real "major" or "minor" quality, you can just use different positions of the pentatonic/blues scale as long as you hit the right notes over the right chords?


By themselves, the chords will carry a major quality. But the simplicity of the progression makes it so that you really can play just about any western scale over them and with proper phrasing, you can make it work. And in doing so, the sound that you choose will determine the tonality.

The same with the blues scale. Even though the blues scale is technically minor, you can easily phrase it to have a major sound because its such a simple set of intervals. So basically, if your playing the blues scale over a blues progression, the feel of the song is 100% phrasing.

Once you start playing more advanced sounds, and doing ii-V's and such it gets a little different. And once you start changing the chords a bit, youll see how you can start to get it to sound strictly major or strictly minor. But at this point in your learning, the greatest advice I can give you is to listen and play a lot.