#2
No such thing. The sound of a chord is determined entirely by context, and most African and Middle Eastern music makes use of an entirely separate music system.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Quote by Archeo Avis
No such thing. The sound of a chord is determined entirely by context, and most African and Middle Eastern music makes use of an entirely separate music system.

Do they even use chords?
Call me Batman.
#4
Quote by J.A.M
Do they even use chords?


No, and certainly not in the sense that Western tonal harmony defines them. More common would be a single drone note.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Ah yeah, but if you look at the phrygian dominant scale, it definitely has an egyptianish feel to it. I could swear I saw this vid from Nile with some egyptian chords, but I can't find it anymore :|
#6
Quote by Keth
Ah yeah, but if you look at the phrygian dominant scale, it definitely has an egyptianish feel to it. I could swear I saw this vid from Nile with some egyptian chords, but I can't find it anymore :|


Phrygian dominant sounds nothing like Egyptian music. It sounds like what people think Egyptian music must sound like, even though they've never heard any. Even then, it only sounds that way when people are deliberately trying to invoke that sound.

Regardless, there are certainly no "egyptian chords".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
Phrygian dominant sounds nothing like Egyptian music. It sounds like what people think Egyptian music must sound like, even though they've never heard any. Even then, it only sounds that way when people are deliberately trying to invoke that sound.

Regardless, there are certainly no "egyptian chords".


well if you know so much about how Egyptian music sounds then what are the prominent features of it?

Just because there isn't a chord or scale that instantly gives you that sound doesn't mean that there aren't hallmark chords and scales vital to achieving that sound
#9
Quote by Keth
Yeah, I thought that was clear in my original post, but thanks anyway


I don't know a huge ammout about this stuff, but suspended chords and b2 scales are pretty common in the sorts of things you are looking for.
#10
Quote by cheese ftw
well if you know so much about how Egyptian music sounds then what are the prominent features of it?

Just because there isn't a chord or scale that instantly gives you that sound doesn't mean that there aren't hallmark chords and scales vital to achieving that sound


Don't double post. There's an edit button for a reason.

The kind of music he's thinking of makes use of an entirely different music system. There are no characteristic chords because there are no chords. There's no 12-TET either, so good luck recreating it on the guitar.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
If anyone has a link to an article or a website on the Middle-Eastern's Music System, I'd greatly appreciate it.
Today is yesterday's tomorrow.
#12
Quote by Archeo Avis
Don't double post. There's an edit button for a reason.

The kind of music he's thinking of makes use of an entirely different music system. There are no characteristic chords because there are no chords. There's no 12-TET either, so good luck recreating it on the guitar.


there are certainly as heck chords used in oriental music and you can approximate their sounds on our instruments (guitar can even do micro tonal inflections). yeah a lot of that stuff is like the "tourist" version of their music but I doubt the op cares about delivering authentic versions of these things. so what if a egyptian music scholar might turn his nose at it, it doesn't mean its worthless.... im sure he just wants to imitate the tourist versions of what hes heard anyway
#14
the intro for Behemoth's "At the left hand ov God" has a type of sound you might be looking for.
*reported*... twice in one reply!


OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!
#15
Try just using a drone note, thats what I do when I go for that eastern sound.

So maybe just keep a low E string ringing, then playing around with E phrygian dominant. Should help start you off with what you want to achieve.
#16
there are certainly as heck chords used in oriental music


Not in the Western tonal sense, no. Even when the music is polyphonic, it tends to make use of drones.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
it'll be very difficult to sound truly Egyptian, its probably all microtonal and use just use drones instead of chords very like Bangra and other middle easten music. Unless you have a sitar or a tabla lying around its going to be difficult.
#18
Quote by Archeo Avis
Not in the Western tonal sense, no. Even when the music is polyphonic, it tends to make use of drones.


thats true
#19
So I was watching this history documentary on ancient egyptian, jewish and babylonian life and the documentary used real egyptian folk music. Anyway, the music was mostly a woman singing over a droned note with some drums played in the background. At least 3 or 4 people commented that they thought the woman was singing off key or just wailing randomly. That's what real egyptian music sounds to modern westerners: off key random notes.

You still want to know about egyptian music?
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#21
Quote by Keth
If that was directed at me, I've stated that I'm looking for the 'tourist' egyptian sound, not the true and original egyptian style.
Oh, well use heaps of unresolved dissonance, use some melodic augmented seconds and add minor sixths to every major chord.

This still sounds kind of crappy imo
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.