#1
I've been playing my guitar for almost one year now and i gotten WAY better. When i first got my guitar I could barely play the intro to Megadeths Symphony of Destruction now it's the easiest thing i could do.

Lately i've been tring to get a band together cause i've started to write my own music and I can do some sweet metal rythem riffs, but i can't seem the get the lead parts down. I can't get a good lead guitar on any of the riffs that i made and i want to know what makes a good lead guitarist and what I should know to become one.

I've started to read the theory lesson that was on this site and i have learned alot from the 5 pages that i've read.

Thanks Again
#3
Quote by pablo_arg
The first step is to know how to spell "guitarist" the right way.


+1
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#4
theory will make lead guitar a whole bunch easier.... basically theory will give you rules and guidlines for making lead lines that fit into your riffs and rhythm and from there you can break the rules as you see fit.....
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#5
Learn a bunch of applied theory AKA scales, a few different patterns, eventually you can work out your way out of everything without seeming out of place, even the scale modes and all that braincooking.
I love music, if music would be a girl then I'd date her, until then let's get back on Earth
#6
are you saying you are more guitarer then everyone in ug

shame shame

lol just learn the scales and their relation on the fretboard and tinker on some improv

thats my 2 cents
#7
I believe a crucial part of being a lead guitarist is know your place and role in the band. Though you may get to do the flashy solos it doesnt make you the face or the purpose of the band.
#8
or u cud just be a rhythm guitarest....
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#9
Quote by Blckspawn
I've been playing my guitar for almost one year now and i gotten WAY better. When i first got my guitar I could barely play the intro to Megadeths Symphony of Destruction now it's the easiest thing i could do.

Lately i've been tring to get a band together cause i've started to write my own music and I can do some sweet metal rythem riffs, but i can't seem the get the lead parts down. I can't get a good lead guitar on any of the riffs that i made and i want to know what makes a good lead guitarist and what I should know to become one.

I've started to read the theory lesson that was on this site and i have learned alot from the 5 pages that i've read.

Thanks Again


Quote by pablo_arg
The first step is to know how to spell "guitarist" the right way.


TYPO, dumbas$
#10
Practice, practice, practice. Make up your own melodies. Harmonize them. Make a simple chord progression (I-IV-V)(or one that you have for a song) and just solo over it slowly. Nothing wanky. That's the best way that I write good melodies. Stay around chord tones, and use some non-chord notes, and you'll be good for that.

Of course, learn theory, and you've already started. But learn to apply that theory.

And for solo's, just improvise and then remember the parts you like. Or analyze your favorite artists solo's and then apply your knowledge that you gained to yours.

Just practice, and you'll get it.
#11
practice vibrato... then it doesn't matter how slow you have to play it sounds good also try starting with blues stuff instead of jumping straight into some crazy speed metal...
#12
Instead of just reading and self teaching theory, I would highly highly highly recommend taking private lessons with a human guitar teacher. Focus on theory, ear training and improv. Learning Jazz probably isn't a bad idea either. It's helped my playing tremendously. You'll have to practice your ass off if you really want to become a good lead player. Id also recommend not getting too cocky. If you've only been playing for about a year, you most likely won't be sounding anything like Dave Mustaine yet and probably won't be for a few years. You have to be really patient and remember to go slow at first. It'll make you more solid a player and it'll help you(hopefully) avoid developing bad habits. Practice with a metronome too, it'll make your playing much tighter and it will make it much easier for those of us who have to record you.
#13
Quote by newaeonwisdom
Instead of just reading and self teaching theory, I would highly highly highly recommend taking private lessons with a human guitar teacher. Focus on theory, ear training and improv. Learning Jazz probably isn't a bad idea either. It's helped my playing tremendously. You'll have to practice your ass off if you really want to become a good lead player. Id also recommend not getting too cocky. If you've only been playing for about a year, you most likely won't be sounding anything like Dave Mustaine yet and probably won't be for a few years. You have to be really patient and remember to go slow at first. It'll make you more solid a player and it'll help you(hopefully) avoid developing bad habits. Practice with a metronome too, it'll make your playing much tighter and it will make it much easier for those of us who have to record you.


What do you mean by "Bad Habbits"?
#14
Quote by Blckspawn
What do you mean by "Bad Habbits"?

Bad technique, such as wiggling your fingers to perform vibrato when it should come from the wrist... I was guilty of that one, though admittedly it's something my guitar teacher taught me to do <_<
Another, more general example of bad technique is lifting your fingers too far away from the fretboard (they should never really be more than an inch away).
Also, fretting too hard or tensing up when you're trying to go fast...

Generally there's a lot of stuff that you do wrong when you're self taught.. I've had to re-learn my techniques a fair number of times to correct stuff that I learned wrong the first time around.
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#15
Quote by Blckspawn
i want to know what makes a good lead guitarist and what I should know to become one.


Looking into theory as you mentioned will definitely help you. Make sure though to spend some time actually playing leads. Pick some of your favorites and start learning /memorizing and playing them. This gives you some context, as well as inspiration.
shred is gaudy music
#16
I often find the best lead guitarists are excellent rhythm players. It's hard to understand melodic theory without a solid understanding of harmony, imo.
#17
Quote by LeperAffinity
Bad technique, such as wiggling your fingers to perform vibrato when it should come from the wrist... I was guilty of that one, though admittedly it's something my guitar teacher taught me to do <_<


If you do heavy finger vibrato on a "high" note, you can make it sound like a pinch harmonic and get a nice metal effect however.
#18
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
If you do heavy finger vibrato on a "high" note, you can make it sound like a pinch harmonic and get a nice metal effect however.


What?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#19
Quote by LeperAffinity
Bad technique, such as wiggling your fingers to perform vibrato when it should come from the wrist... I was guilty of that one, though admittedly it's something my guitar teacher taught me to do <_<
Another, more general example of bad technique is lifting your fingers too far away from the fretboard (they should never really be more than an inch away).
Also, fretting too hard or tensing up when you're trying to go fast...

Generally there's a lot of stuff that you do wrong when you're self taught.. I've had to re-learn my techniques a fair number of times to correct stuff that I learned wrong the first time around.


You called?

Seriously though, lessons are a good idea, theory's always a good idea, and finding flaws in your technique are very important.
Terrible even.
#20
Quote by Blckspawn
TYPO, dumbas$


all i have to say here is shut up. they guy asked for help playing his guitar not participating in a spelling bee. its the internet no one cares. as for the question if you havent done so get lessons they help alot. i was self tought for about a year, i was good, but getting hands on lessons really opened up my mind. also learned how to solo out of it to. alot easier then i thought
#21
Quote by LeperAffinity
Bad technique, such as wiggling your fingers to perform vibrato when it should come from the wrist... I was guilty of that one, though admittedly it's something my guitar teacher taught me to do <_<
Another, more general example of bad technique is lifting your fingers too far away from the fretboard (they should never really be more than an inch away).
Also, fretting too hard or tensing up when you're trying to go fast...

Generally there's a lot of stuff that you do wrong when you're self taught.. I've had to re-learn my techniques a fair number of times to correct stuff that I learned wrong the first time around.


Don't forget playing flat fingered instead of on the tips.