#1
I know that body woods affect the tone, what is the best for High level sounds, and low?

Is High Alder? Alder body and rosewood neck (25.5, 12-16 Radius)

Is Mahogany Low (24.75 scale)
#2
alder is very balanced and even, while mohagony is warmer, and has more low-end tonality
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#3
You'll find maple is much brighter than alder, if you're looking for a 'high' sound, but it's very heavy. Alternatively, ash gives a nice sound, and harder, denser woods give you more high end in your tone. Mahogany, being softer than Alder and maple, will give you a low, warm and dark sound, because it is soft and only moderately dense. This is the general trend for woods, but there are some exceptions, and some impracticalities. For example, Wenge, an African dark wood, is very bright and dense, but too heavy to use for a body wood, and Pine is very light and will give you a low tone, but it's too light and low quality to use for guitar wood (except acoustics). Hope that helps a bit.
Gear:
Fender Hot Rod Deville 2x12
Custom Built Guitar (made it myself)
PRS SE Soapbar II Maple
Fender Stratacoustic (Stolen! )
Digitech RP200
Boss MT-2
Roland Microcube
I like my stuff!
#4
oh it does, thank you, what is the least dense wood that you can use on a body and vise versa?
#5
Hmm, odd how no one has mentioned Poplar. Itsa very inexpensive wood but is very dense. Gives a very clear sound, if you're using this guitar as a primarily clean guitar (no distortion or mild overdrive) use poplar. Brings out the highs and mids very nicely but still breaks up very nicely for a metal guitar.
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#6
Soldier, it depends on what kind of tone you're looking for. Remember that you can always combine woods in a body or neck as well. What sound are you trying to get, or what style will you be using the guitar for (primarily)?
Gear:
Fender Hot Rod Deville 2x12
Custom Built Guitar (made it myself)
PRS SE Soapbar II Maple
Fender Stratacoustic (Stolen! )
Digitech RP200
Boss MT-2
Roland Microcube
I like my stuff!
#7
Well im set for a Low Drop-C Sound.

Im going to want a wood with real high end, very responsive to harmonics, but some what low at the lower frets.
#8
If you're going primarily for metal, you'll probably want either solid mahogany or a mahogany body with a maple cap. If you do go for the maple cap, it's probably best to use a mahogany neck so that the guitar doesn't sound too twangy. Because you want all t he harmonics and you still want the brightness in your highs, I'd recommend the mahogany/maple combination over the only mahogany body. Mahogany gives a nice dark and low tone like you want on the lower end, but the maple will balance this out to make sure that your mids aren't drowned out, and that your highs will still ring clear. To give you a reference point, this is the wood combination in a Les Paul, so if you choose to do a single cut (which you should, to retain the lows for the chugging), your guitar should sound like a Les Paul. Happy building!
Gear:
Fender Hot Rod Deville 2x12
Custom Built Guitar (made it myself)
PRS SE Soapbar II Maple
Fender Stratacoustic (Stolen! )
Digitech RP200
Boss MT-2
Roland Microcube
I like my stuff!
#9
lol, this is all confusing. I understand what your saying, but i played a Jackson today and it was alder, Great highs, Amazing harmonics, but bad lows
#10
That's because alder won't give you as good lows as mahogany will, it's still in the same class as maple, but it's just a bit less extreme. Alder is what strats are made of, so they're focused on mids and highs rather than satisfying lows. If you use both mahogany and maple you'll get both the nice lows and the great highs and amazing harmonics. Trust me, I made a guitar out of them and it seems to fit your description exactly. It was the same sound I was looking for: balanced, but heavier on either extreme, with really good highs and really good lows, but without sacrificing the mids. I got that sound with mahogany and maple.
Gear:
Fender Hot Rod Deville 2x12
Custom Built Guitar (made it myself)
PRS SE Soapbar II Maple
Fender Stratacoustic (Stolen! )
Digitech RP200
Boss MT-2
Roland Microcube
I like my stuff!
#11
Quote by muse-ik
That's because alder won't give you as good lows as mahogany will, it's still in the same class as maple, but it's just a bit less extreme. Alder is what strats are made of, so they're focused on mids and highs rather than satisfying lows. If you use both mahogany and maple you'll get both the nice lows and the great highs and amazing harmonics. Trust me, I made a guitar out of them and it seems to fit your description exactly. It was the same sound I was looking for: balanced, but heavier on either extreme, with really good highs and really good lows, but without sacrificing the mids. I got that sound with mahogany and maple.


Thank you sooo much
#12
hahaha no problem, I hope I solved any confusion you had before. Good luck with your build.
Gear:
Fender Hot Rod Deville 2x12
Custom Built Guitar (made it myself)
PRS SE Soapbar II Maple
Fender Stratacoustic (Stolen! )
Digitech RP200
Boss MT-2
Roland Microcube
I like my stuff!