#1
well all day today i have sat down (almost 12 hours so far) and learned my music theory. i have learned alot. and i mean alot! lol
but my question is (and its been bothering me for quite some time now)

Can you solo well using the harmonic minor scale using it over power chords?

i listen to alot of thrash and recently i started a band with a couple of friends. the biggest problem for me is that i still havent read alot about doing that.
ive seen alot of soloing over amaj and d7 and stuff like that but will it work the same way over powerchords? theyre not major nor minor so yeah.
can somebody help me out?

and the reason that i really wanna apply the harmonis minor scale is because my favorite type of music is neo-classical. and i want to apply that in a thrash band.


and another question is
how to solo well over long chord progressions becasue one of my recent songs that i made with my band is : e5, d5, c5, b5,c5,b5, c5 e5.
can somebdy help me with that?
Classical Guitarist
#2
You can. 5 chords are neither major nor minor, so it doesn't have a true tonality. I'm pretty sure that's what Yngwie Malmsteen does... though, i've never really learned one of his songs.

But, keep in mind, just because you use harmonic minor doesn't mean it's going to sound "neo-classical". It's about harmony, and knowing how to use it. To do it right, you should probably study up on classical theory (as you have... but more) and analyze some classical/baroque/romantic-era pieces, as well as some truly "Neo-classical" pieces (if you want some weird things to do).
#3
Quote by DiminishedFifth
You can. 5 chords are neither major nor minor, so it doesn't have a true tonality. I'm pretty sure that's what Yngwie Malmsteen does... though, i've never really learned one of his songs.

But, keep in mind, just because you use harmonic minor doesn't mean it's going to sound "neo-classical". It's about harmony, and knowing how to use it. To do it right, you should probably study up on classical theory (as you have... but more) and analyze some classical/baroque/romantic-era pieces, as well as some truly "Neo-classical" pieces (if you want some weird things to do).


well ive recently learned to play alot of actual classical music. i have gotten alot of inspiration from jason becker and how he studied. so i began to learn some stuff from paganini and mozart and debussy and stuff like that you know. but soloing is where i really want to improve.
Classical Guitarist
#4
If you play the augmented 7th of the harmonic minor scale over the iii power chord of the regular minor scale it might sound icky. Overall, you're pretty safe if you're over power chords.
#5
Quote by Eastwinn
If you play the augmented 7th of the harmonic minor scale over the iii power chord of the regular minor scale it might sound icky. Overall, you're pretty safe if you're over power chords.


Side note: Harmonic minor (ignoring the fact that it's not really a scale, but a convention) has a major seventh, not an augmented seventh (which would be enharmonic to an octave).
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Quote by Zep_shizzle
well ive recently learned to play alot of actual classical music. i have gotten alot of inspiration from jason becker and how he studied. so i began to learn some stuff from paganini and mozart and debussy and stuff like that you know. but soloing is where i really want to improve.

As well as everything I said earlier, and phrasing. Thats how the greats did it (including Mozart and Paganini).
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
Side note: Harmonic minor (ignoring the fact that it's not really a scale, but a convention) has a major seventh, not an augmented seventh (which would be enharmonic to an octave).


That was a slip of the tongue. What I meant was that the seventh was augmented in comparison with the seventh of the regular minor scale. I realize now that that was a bad choice of words.
#8
power chords, while they are not themselves major or minor, are really implied to be depending on the progression. i.e. if you played C5 F5 G5 C5, you're obviously in C major, even though those aren't major chords.
#10
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
wait, what? why is it not a scale?


Harmonic minor is a convention within minor tonality in which the seventh degree is raised when it is expected to lead to the tonic. It was never distinct from "minor", it was just a way to allow for a proper resolution. Only in a few small circles is it actually treated as a scale, and even then it's almost always better described as the minor scale with a major seventh thrown in.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
Harmonic minor is a convention within minor tonality in which the seventh degree is raised when it is expected to lead to the tonic. It was never distinct from "minor", it was just a way to allow for a proper resolution. Only in a few small circles is it actually treated as a scale, and even then it's almost always better described as the minor scale with a major seventh thrown in.

interesting. i guess that makes sense. but ive always read it as an actual scale. every time i see it in a book its usually seems to be treated as its own thing. although they do describe it as the natural minor with the 7th degree raised.
#12
Quote by Archeo Avis
Harmonic minor is a convention within minor tonality in which the seventh degree is raised when it is expected to lead to the tonic. It was never distinct from "minor", it was just a way to allow for a proper resolution. Only in a few small circles is it actually treated as a scale, and even then it's almost always better described as the minor scale with a major seventh thrown in.



Holy ****, that actually explains a lot.
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#13
Quote by Archeo Avis
Side note: Harmonic minor (ignoring the fact that it's not really a scale, but a convention) has a major seventh, not an augmented seventh (which would be enharmonic to an octave).
I just heard Allan Holdsworth describe the seventh in a harmonic minor scale as an augmented seventh. You must be wrong!
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