#1
If i'm playing lets use a I-IV-V or i-iv-v progression when could i substitute m7 for an m chord or m9 for m or M7 or M9 for a Maj chord?
#4
Quote by amd123
You know i asked the search bar and i got that answer, do you have another?


Pick up a textbook on harmony and learn how the chords actually function.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
If you like the sound, do it. Remember, music theory is descriptive. It is not a set of rules. In a i-iv-v progression, using i9 or iv9 is diatonic whereas v9 would not be. In a I-IV-V progression I maj9, IV maj 9, V9 or any of them add 9 would be diatonic.
#7
It depends, there's extended dominants and there's substitute dominants. I think you might be confusing them. Secondary dominants are dominant chords that resolve down a 5th to a diatonic chord but are not in the key. (Ex:Key of C) (V7/ii)A7 to (ii-7)D-7. This type of motion usually occurs starting on a weak stress point (in 4/4 usually on bars 2 or 4). An extended dominant is a line of chords all resolving down a fifth and eventually reaching the key, however during the run there is no way for the listener to really indicate a definite key. (Ex:Key of C) (3)E7 to A7 to D7 to (V7)G7 to (IMaj7)CMag7. This type of motion usually occurs on a strong stress point (In 4/4 usually bars 1 or 3). You could also have a Secondary dominant resolve deceptively into an extended dominant run. The key to all this is to practice it with different chords and see what and where sounds good.
#8
Usually extensions are added to chords so the progression fits the melody better. So if it just so happens B seems to be a prominent note in a measure, but the chord for that measure is Am7, you could make that an Am9 (which has a B in it) and fits the melody better.

Also, sometimes extensions are used to make chords flow better between each other. Unless you're writing your chord progressions with some sort of jazzy free counterpoint, I don't think you need to worry about this.

Whenever it sounds good.
Although true, this doesn't explain anything or help anyone in any way shape or form.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#9
I actually prefer extended chords to basic triads in alot of situtations, they are fuller sounding, add more movement, and offer up more chord tones for the melody. As for when to use them, look up how to form chords from scales and write some basic songs using them.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#10
Chord extensions are usually used to increase the chords richness and dissonance without altering its function.
#11
Quote by amd123
If i'm playing lets use a I-IV-V or i-iv-v progression when could i substitute m7 for an m chord or m9 for m or M7 or M9 for a Maj chord?


You can only substitute a m7 for a m9 when its functioning as a ii.
#12
We have an edit button for a reason. Don't double post.

You contradict yourself with those posts. If extensions don't alter the function of a chord, then it should be possible to substitute a m7 for a m9 regardless of whether or not the chord is functioning as a ii chord.

In reality, extensions resolve just like any other chord tone. Depending of the circumstances, one extension may very well be preferable to another, and may alter the function of the chord.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
it seems like i have more work to do.
I don't know what these mean:
resolve
dissonance
counterpoint
dominant