illinihoops
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2009
529 IQ
#1
I want to get a bone nut and saddle in my cheapie Yamaha Fg700 but I am not crafty enough to do it and set it up myself. I don't want to get ripped off so what is a fair price for this?
Schneiderman
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Join date: Jul 2006
1,881 IQ
#3
For the price of having a shop do it you can do it yourself and even if you mess up 5 times and need to buy new nut and saddle blanks you will end up spending less. If you get it right the first time you will spend under $20.
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#4
Quote by illinihoops
I want to get a bone nut and saddle in my cheapie Yamaha Fg700

Any particular reason?

I would recommend trying the saddle by yourself. It is remarkably easy.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Apr 30, 2009,
claimed4all
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2009
21 IQ
#5
Much better tone and sustain with Bone. Saddle makes a good difference and if you are going to play alot of open chords then you should do a nut also.
illinihoops
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2009
529 IQ
#6
I have been tuning down a half step and playing with a capo on the first fret because of the way it sounds, I could do the saddle by myself but I dont know about the nut and I dont want to screw that up
claimed4all
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2009
21 IQ
#7
If you use a Capo then a nut job will not make a difference.
Schneiderman
Schneider
Join date: Jul 2006
1,881 IQ
#8
The worst case scenario if you try and fail to do the nut yourself is that you just reinstall the original nut until you can bring it to a pro.
Survivor of the St. John's Lockdown
Quote by SG thrasher

The thread-starter is a legend.
Seriously, who thinks "Shit, i'm gonna die, BRB, Ima' tell UG."?

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Congratz man, you are a true, American Hero.
Go Schneiderman!

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illinihoops
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2009
529 IQ
#9
Quote by claimed4all
If you use a Capo then a nut job will not make a difference.

I am saying the sound has been bothering me so I tune a half step down and put a capo on the first fret so it sounds better, but I need a more long term solution
Chad48309
UG's Best Cannibal
Join date: May 2007
743 IQ
#10
I can't recommend Colosi's saddles enough: http://www.guitarsaddles.com/

The nut is the toughest part, in my opinion. Getting your spacing, depth, and slot size perfect is a pain in the neck. You get good with it after the 7th time around, really.

If you really aren't sure, I'd put the saddle in yourself (Colosi's are cut so well that it's pretty much a no-brainer putting them in) and then leave the nut to a professional. It'd still save you a ton of cash (especially if you bought the nut first and only paid for installation).
Sincerely, Chad.
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illinihoops
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2009
529 IQ
#11
Quote by Chad48309
I can't recommend Colosi's saddles enough: http://www.guitarsaddles.com/

The nut is the toughest part, in my opinion. Getting your spacing, depth, and slot size perfect is a pain in the neck. You get good with it after the 7th time around, really.

If you really aren't sure, I'd put the saddle in yourself (Colosi's are cut so well that it's pretty much a no-brainer putting them in) and then leave the nut to a professional. It'd still save you a ton of cash (especially if you bought the nut first and only paid for installation).

Hmm he doesnt have yamaha on there but I suppose I could send mine in to get it replicated, then I would not have to worry the action being messed up
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#12
Quote by claimed4all
Much better tone and sustain with Bone. Saddle makes a good difference and if you are going to play alot of open chords then you should do a nut also.

I'm aware that saddle materials affect the sound of the guitar, but I think "much better" is certainly an exaggeration. I want to make sure the thread starter knows that putting the effort into a new nut and saddle will not make the guitar improve as dramatically as he may be hoping. In all likelihood, he may not even be able to tell a difference.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Apr 30, 2009,
illinihoops
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2009
529 IQ
#13
Quote by GC Shred Off
I'm aware that saddle materials affect the sound of the guitar, but I think "much better" is certainly an exaggeration. I want to make sure the thread starter knows that putting the effort into a new nut and saddle will not make the guitar improve as dramatically as he may be hoping. In all likelihood, he may not even be able to tell a difference.

The main thing for me is the nut because there is a very audible difference from when I play open strings with and without a capo, so I am thinking a new nut combined with the saddle can improve the clarity.
Chad48309
UG's Best Cannibal
Join date: May 2007
743 IQ
#14
Quote by GC Shred Off
I'm aware that saddle materials affect the sound of the guitar, but I think "much better" is certainly an exaggeration. I want to make sure the thread starter knows that putting the effort into a new nut and saddle will not make the guitar improve as dramatically as he may be hoping. In all likelihood, he may not even be able to tell a difference.

When I first switched to bone from TUSQ, I heard a night and day difference. No one will convince me that TUSQ has the same sound as bone. Ever. Especially when you see how the strings "ooze" into the plastic after a little while (and not saw or fracture like bone).

And if Yamaha uses cheap plastic (as I believe they do), then you're going to hear an even larger difference (if you have a trained ear).

Look into getting bone bridge pins. They give you very slightly clearer lows, in my experience.
Sincerely, Chad.
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Helma
Registered User
Join date: May 2009
10 IQ
#15
Hi guys, I was interested in your thoughts on the best replacement material for an acoustic nut and saddle. Ivory is most probably a no go! I'm leaning towards Bone but am swaying toward tusq.....d'oh!

This is an interesting home test an acoustic player did....
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Chad48309
UG's Best Cannibal
Join date: May 2007
743 IQ
#16
Quote by Helma
Hi guys, I was interested in your thoughts on the best replacement material for an acoustic nut and saddle. Ivory is most probably a no go! I'm leaning towards Bone but am swaying toward tusq.....d'oh!

This is an interesting home test an acoustic player did....
-----------------
private investigator
Insurance Quotes

Fossilized Walrus Ivory is the best material you can use for nuts and saddles. However, if that is not in your price range, then you should go with bone. I would never, ever recommend a TUSQ saddle to someone. They can throw all the charts they want at me, but the difference in clarity is like night and day. Also, TUSQ is really far less durable. After only a few months, I saw terrible impressions in the plastic from the strings (you could actually see the windings on the strings; that's how deep they were).

In my opinion, TUSQ isn't worth it. It's just a ploy for animal sympathizers.
Sincerely, Chad.
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LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.