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bigcheese_1989
UG Member
Join date: May 2009
676 IQ
#1
So, I'm torn between going back to school OR being in a band.

The problem is, that I can't do both because if I'm gonna be in school, then I want to focus all of my attention on school. Same thing if I'm gonna be in a band. Right now, I don't go back to school (if that's the decision I make) until August.

It's so hard to find band members, so I've been thinking about going solo. I've also been recording my own demo, so I can get it to labels.

I just don't know where to go from here though. I'm still looking for a job. I basically feel like a loser because I'm 20 years old, I don't have a car, I don't have a paying job. I've been spending all of my time on my music and my family basically thinks my music is a waste of time. But of course, I feel different about it being a waste of time.

Most people are successful in music before the age of 30, so I know I better get on the roll!! I just don't know what to do though. I don't know if I should go back to school and finish my degree in English. OR if I should live my dream.

My dream is to be a successful musician. I feel like I was born to live my dream. By the time I get out of school, I'll be 24 years old and my dream would have been on hold for 4 years. See what I'm saying? I'm so torn
Last edited by bigcheese_1989 at Jun 9, 2009,
merfsullivan
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#2
What exactly do you plan on doing with an English degree?
Demolition hands.... Got 'em!
abysspell
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#4
and that is where i will be when i finish high school XD

i think that i'll have the same problem (torn between education and music)

the way i see it, i'm going to take a chance at the music industry and maybe get educated when i'm old and stuff... but then, thats me :P

good luck man!
iKoen
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#5
In my opionion you should finish school so you have something to rely on,
but can't you like become a music teacher?
or don't you high school people have music lessons like i have in the netherlands?
(think about the sort of school of rock sort of teacher)
and when you are a music teacher, you have a paying job,
lots of free time, and music..
bigcheese_1989
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#6
Quote by merfsullivan
What exactly do you plan on doing with an English degree?

Writing for a newspaper. No joke
SEALSniper1152
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#7
ok, what your doing to yourself is called the "black and white" fallacy. you have created a fake this or that situation, in which you are sacrificing one thing for another. Why would school take up 100% of your time? I am in a band and I go to school. I have recorded solo for 2 years while in school. Playing music doesn't consume nearly 100% of your time. Any time i've been in a band, life has been "hurry up and wait" and solo, ha, inspiration is not a constant barrage. Re-evaluate your situation, I think you'll find that it is very easy to find a happy medium.

and you should re-evaluate your dream too, being "successful" can happen at any point, I think what you want is fame. To which, I would say, is a waste of time.
Last edited by SEALSniper1152 at Jun 9, 2009,
bigcheese_1989
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#8
Quote by iKoen
In my opionion you should finish school so you have something to rely on,
but can't you like become a music teacher?
or don't you high school people have music lessons like i have in the netherlands?
(think about the sort of school of rock sort of teacher)
and when you are a music teacher, you have a paying job,
lots of free time, and music..


My family has brought this to my attention, but honestly you guys, majoring in music or being a music teacher is not my kind of thing at all. I want to be a successful touring musician, not teach it or be forced to learn it as a music major . I don't mean to sound mean but reall, that's just NOT my thing at all.
SEALSniper1152
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#9
Quote by abysspell
and that is where i will be when i finish high school XD

i think that i'll have the same problem (torn between education and music)

the way i see it, i'm going to take a chance at the music industry and maybe get educated when i'm old and stuff... but then, thats me :P

good luck man!


That is a very foolish road. Trust me, I know a few people that tried it. All still live at home with their parents, and have a job that pays minimum wage (if they have a job at all). Otherwise they get drunk a lot, and rant about how they will "make it some day."

good luck.
bigcheese_1989
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#10
Quote by SEALSniper1152
ok, what your doing to yourself is called the "black and white" fallacy. you have created a fake this or that situation, in which you are sacrificing one thing for another. Why would school take up 100% of your time? I am in a band and I go to school. I have recorded solo for 2 years while in school. Playing music doesn't consume nearly 100% of your time. Any time i've been in a band, life has been "hurry up and wait" and solo, ha, inspiration is not a constant barrage. Re-evaluate your situation, I think you'll find that it is very easy to find a happy medium.

and you should re-evaluate your dream too, being "successful" can happen at any point, I think what you want is fame. To which, I would say, is a waste of time.


I think SOME of what you're saying is right. I guess school wouldn't take up 100% of my time. And no I'm looking for success on my terms, not fame.
SEALSniper1152
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#11
Quote by bigcheese_1989
My family has brought this to my attention, but honestly you guys, majoring in music or being a music teacher is not my kind of thing at all. I want to be a successful touring musician, not teach it or be forced to learn it as a music major . I don't mean to sound mean but reall, that's just NOT my thing at all.


A lot of huge turing musicians were music majors, like all of Dream Theater. Everybody in Queen had mastor's degrees in music theory. all of COB had years an years of classical violin training. You are making this harder than it needs to be, and you seem to have your head up your ass. Is doing bitch work at a law firm my thing? god no. But I do it because that is what will get me to my end goal. Maximized gain, Minimized risk.
bigcheese_1989
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#12
Quote by SEALSniper1152
A lot of huge turing musicians were music majors, like all of Dream Theater. Everybody in Queen had mastor's degrees in music theory. all of COB had years an years of classical violin training. You are making this harder than it needs to be, and you seem to have your head up your ass. Is doing bitch work at a law firm my thing? god no. But I do it because that is what will get me to my end goal. Maximized gain, Minimized risk.


But isn't that like a huge waste of time? I could be following the road to my true goals.
SEALSniper1152
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#13
Quote by bigcheese_1989
But isn't that like a huge waste of time? I could be following the road to my true goals.


Education is the one investment that never looses value. No, because you can record, write and learn all at once. And like I said... you CAN do both.
lt22
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#14
Quote by bigcheese_1989
Writing for a newspaper. No joke


seriously? newspapers are dying off, man. Just so you know. My uncle used to work for the Atlanta Journal Constitution, but now the office that he was manager of doesn't even exist any more.

Anyway, you shouldn't be so single minded then. Just do school, and during summer and on weekends play some music. It's not that hard... I do it all the time. Plus there should be some people you can start a band with at college, unless people at your college are just boring.
iKoen
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#15
True dat Sniper!
nicely said!
its like you put it in the open the way cheese doesn't want to hear it,
he actually wanted like
GO FOR MUSIC
and he would've done it, this makes him seriously concider i think
koslack
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#16
Quote by bigcheese_1989
But isn't that like a huge waste of time? I could be following the road to my true goals.



Every loser never-was who works in a music store giving attitude to everyone who comes through the door was following the road to their true goals.
It's not like this is the kind of thing where if you work hard enough, you are guaranteed success. If you work hard, you might be able to make a living. If you can't read music, the chances drop. If you insist on only playing rock, the chances drop much further. The only way to ensure success in the music industry is to be an excellent, diverse musician. That means being able to sight read jazz and classical charts, know how to play as many genres as you can think of, and having no problem playing other peoples material.
In short, if you are ok with that, go to music school. If not, if your thing is to be making a career playing songs you wrote, get used to the taste of Kraft Dinner, because it's pretty much all you'll eat for the next 50 years.

Besides, there's no reason you can't have both. I play in a band, and I go to university full time. I also work a full time job. You can accomplish as much as you want as long as you aren't lazy, and use time wisely.
Myshadow46_2
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#17
You're young, it's time to make as much of your music as you can because you normally inherit more responsibility as you get older and that takes up more time. However, if you are intelligent and want to make the right decision, you'll carry on educating yourself. Work hard on your education and work hard with your music. I used to want to be in a touring band and just do that for the rest of my life, and I still do, but I just enjoy my music for what it is and what will be will be. I'll work hard at it, but there is no way I will take a step back from everything else that supports me while I make my music.
zephyrclaw
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#18
Why don't you study a music course instead? Also, even if you plan on returning to your English degree, I'm sure you'll be able to dedicate at least a little time to music. I pity you if English fills all hours of your waking - and possibly sleeping - life. o_0

In the end, which is more stable? Education or a band that doesn't yet exist? Or, are there other options? You could always just find a job instead and create a healthy income for yourself while you search for band members. If you have the option, though, I think studying a music degree would definitely be the happiest thing for you to do. I'm undertaking a business course at the moment and I have to admit that I sometimes honestly wonder what would have happened if I'd gone down the music route instead, or something similar. I seriously don't think that commerce and economics are what I want to do in life, so it's kind of pointless in that sense. If you're certain that what you truly want to accomplish in life is to be in a successful band, then you should go for that and not waste time on major things that will only detract from that dream. I guess that in the end, you alone have to decide how important music is to you and what benefits you gain from studying English. Good luck.
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#19
Quote by bigcheese_1989
But isn't that like a huge waste of time? I could be following the road to my true goals.


The band members getting degrees wasn't a huge waste of time because;

(a) if the band wasn't successful, they'd still be great diverse mucicians, capable of employment, unlike yourself

(b) they met eachother in university, and created a band, which you don't have
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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Kino Chan
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#20
Go to a music school
If someone posted that before, too band. My band and I allhave our sights set on Berklee
axemanchris
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#21
Here's a response I gave a while back to a very similar thread....

this from a 39-year old who was in your same shoes back many moons ago....

About being a musician:

I think if you have hopes of making a career in music, you'd best make that your plan. If you get a big fat record deal and get famous, then awesome. If not, you're still following the course you've planned for - to be a professional musician.

First: You have no pretenses of being a rock star. That's fine. Do you know what it's like to be a full-time musician? I mean... *really* know?

There can be really decent money in playing gigs. It's a tough road, though, full of balancing business with pleasure. Weddings and corporate gigs pay really well. You'll walk out of there with a few hundred in your pocket for only a few hours work. Problem is.... how many hours do you work in a week? Solution = hustle, hustle, hustle.... you've got to be out there pounding away to get those gigs.

Of course, weddings are generally only on weekends. If you're really, really, really lucky you can round out your week with corporate events. Problem#2 is..... you want to play Disturbed, not Neil Diamond. Solution = suck it up. Don't bite the hand that feeds. You know what side your bread is buttered on. Some people call it selling out. Professional musicians call it making a living. Smile and sing along.... "Sweeee-eeet Car-o-liiiine.... ba DA-ba-ba...." Sure, don't laugh all the way to the bank, but at least all the way to the grocery store. Geez.... that's still only a few gigs a week. Sounds sweet as a teenager, but eventually you have to take on the real world. "when you're an adult, it's no cliche.... it's the truth..." (go ahead... identify that quote... )

So how do you round it out....well.... If you go to school for music and get a classical background, you can open yourself up for solo/duo gigs outside of your wedding band for other functions, corporate events, etc. People will hire a classical guitarist for whatever. Since there's nobody to share the money with, you do okay. Of course.... still no Disturbed. You're still sucking it up playing some version of Hotel California 'by request' (or even not....) right along side your Sor, Tarrega, Dowland, etc. That gives you a couple more shows.... but you still need a 'real job' as an adult - that is, one that pays for rent/mortgage, food, car, etc.

The poverty line for a family of four in the USA (I'm not American either, but they provide a handy bench mark) is $21, 200. For an individual, it is $10 400. That's about a thousand a month... just to live above the poverty line. Another point of comparison... take an average city.... Cleveland Ohio. Rent for an average apartment seems to be about $600. Then food, phone, insurance, gas, hydro, internet, spending, etc. Yikes.

So wadda ya do? Well... you can rent yourself out to bands as a hired guy. Need a guitarist? I'm your guy! I'll do it for $XXX. Artistic freedom? Nope. Now you're totally selling your soul. More Sweet Caroline. Maybe some Shania Twain or Dwight Yokum. Maybe some Bob Seger and Tom Petty. Who knows, really? Of course, you have to be able to sit down and learn these tunes on very short notice, and know them well enough to gig on them with one rehearsal if you're lucky.

Of course, you can't always count on those. Take on a few students (remember that hustle thing?) to help round things out. So, now you're above the poverty line. You've got sporadic hours that seem to pretty reliably fill up your evenings and weekends, and see you working quite late. At least you get to sleep in. Or not. Because tomorrow you have to learn some Green Day and Blink 182 and U2 for a cover band on Friday, and you don't have all day because some kid is coming over at 4:30 for his lesson and another at 5:30, and then you have to eat and start getting ready to head out for your gigs. And then at some point, you have your OWN kids and family to work into that crazy schedule!! (of course, with the screwed up hours you keep, you may wind up being single for the rest of your natural life... "Wanna go on a date? How's Tuesday afternoon for you?"..... another career hazard!)

Still sound like fun? If it does, you have what it takes to be a professional musician. If it sounds pretty crappy, then..... keep music as a hobby. Or incorporate it into some other career path. (that's what I did....)

About being a teacher:

My choice was to take music in university as a means towards a teaching job in the public school system. Careful, now... do NOT go into teaching unless you really feel called to do it. It will eat you alive otherwise. However, I get a good salary, a great pension, great benefits, holidays, etc... and best of all, I love my job. I'm NOT one of those people that others have described. Yes, it IS all about choices and taking charge of your own fate.

I just want to say again for the record...DO NOT GO INTO TEACHING UNLESS YOU REALLY WANT TO TEACH!! You haven't implied that you might, but some of the advice recently might be taken that way.

I'm a teacher. I love my job. But!! If you don't love it, it will eat you alive. You'll be happier at a desk somewhere selling insurance policies over the phone. The people who get into it for the wrong reasons often don't last long. Those that do are just eternally miserable.

It is a ridiculously demanding job. Demanding enough that if you don't *really* want to do it... you're screwed. Most days, I don't have time to eat lunch. That's the truth. Sit down at my desk?! Yeah, right. Dreamland!! The people who have no idea and look at it only for the $$ and holidays are often in for an awful surprise. Twelve years in, I still put in roughly a 50 hour work week.

"Hey, where's my 15 minute morning break?"

"You're kidding, right?"

"Uh.... oh.... okay, then."

The luxury I have now is that I get to make music on my terms... because I want to. I am in complete control of my musical activities, because I don't depend on it for a living.

One thing I'll add here is that, here is what happens with pursuing a career "to fall back on" via the college route:

You meet tons of girls. You meet a girl that you like best out of all of them. (for me, it was a couple years after university, but whatevs) You finish school. Inevitably, you find yourself with a girl, a job ticket into a career, and a girl who wants to get married.... and so do you. And you have the means to make money and start enjoying things. So you take that job that you've worked hard to get.

Music really does become something that you do in your spare time. You still have to make it a priority, or else you will have no spare time in which to justify making music, and then it gets forgotten. If you make it a priority (and make sure your partner is supportive of your music), then you can make it work. Because you're not always going to have very much spare time - especially when kids come... unless you make time to do it.

I know all this seems light-years away, but it comes a heck of a lot faster than you think it will. Trust me.... I spent a few years laughing about someone who said, when I was 23, that "30 is just around the corner." And after what seemed like only a couple of years, it became eerily UNfunny.


CT

... a couple more posts about teaching
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=17506737&postcount=20
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=16688779&postcount=7
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Jun 9, 2009,
toaster_poodle
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#22
Another thing to think about is that the music industry consists of a lot more than the actual performers. There are tons of specialized schools that offer Associate's degrees in audio production/recording and stuff like that, maybe kind of a "safer" way to still do what you love.

I'm basically in the same boat as you though. I just finished my first year of college, and I hated it. I went in with an open mind, wanting to "live the college life" and eventually find my calling or whatever, but it wasn't long before my music aspirations crept back into my mind. And once that happened and I stopped lying to myself about what I really cared about in my life, school just became a distraction. I could hardly motivate myself to even go to class, I just wanted to get out of there so I could live my life and chase my dream. Needless to say I've chosen not to return (Well, they're not letting me back for a semester anyway because they're biased against students who's GPA starts with a decimal point...) and as of right now I'm pretty sure I'm going to pursue the music school route I mentioned earlier. I wish I had the guts to just pack up and head for some new city with a good scene to start a band in and whatnot, but as of right now a two year program in audio production seems like a good way to get a solid education and buy myself some time while still being involved in what I love and working towards my goal of making music my life.
“A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do.”
-Bob Dylan

Quote by Freezer Burn

Congratz on the having the longest wall of text ever!


bigcheese_1989
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#23
Quote by toaster_poodle
Another thing to think about is that the music industry consists of a lot more than the actual performers. There are tons of specialized schools that offer Associate's degrees in audio production/recording and stuff like that, maybe kind of a "safer" way to still do what you love.

I'm basically in the same boat as you though. I just finished my first year of college, and I hated it. I went in with an open mind, wanting to "live the college life" and eventually find my calling or whatever, but it wasn't long before my music aspirations crept back into my mind. And once that happened and I stopped lying to myself about what I really cared about in my life, school just became a distraction. I could hardly motivate myself to even go to class, I just wanted to get out of there so I could live my life and chase my dream. Needless to say I've chosen not to return (Well, they're not letting me back for a semester anyway because they're biased against students who's GPA starts with a decimal point...) and as of right now I'm pretty sure I'm going to pursue the music school route I mentioned earlier. I wish I had the guts to just pack up and head for some new city with a good scene to start a band in and whatnot, but as of right now a two year program in audio production seems like a good way to get a solid education and buy myself some time while still being involved in what I love and working towards my goal of making music my life.



The same thing happened to me. Packing up and moving away doesn't sound so bad, man.

Most of you guys make "the dream" sound so impossible, but i know in my heart that it's not impossible for me. I don't think I'll regret following my dream. Thanks for the advice.

AxemanChris, I felt like you really went out of your way to help me and believe me, I did read and understand everything. thx guys
SlackerBabbath
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#24
Quote by bigcheese_1989
Writing for a newspaper. No joke

Ever thought of writing for a music based publication? That way, you get to mix your chosen profession with your passion for music and it will probably help you build up a good list of contacts too.

Also, nice feckin' post axemanchris.
AlanHB
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#25
A lot of people say they'll put all their time into music and just don't. Take you for example. After two years you don't have a band. That hardly sounds like you're putting all your time in. Not enough guts to leave? Geez.

Do the parents say "get off the couch and get a job" alot?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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Nietsche
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#26
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Ever thought of writing for a music based publication? That way, you get to mix your chosen profession with your passion for music and it will probably help you build up a good list of contacts too.

Also, nice feckin' post axemanchris.


Brian hugh warner wrote music articles for a south florida lifestyle magazine before he donned the white makeup and became marilyn manson.
.
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#27
Quote by merfsullivan
What exactly do you plan on doing with an English degree?


my name is matt. you can call me that if you like.
axemanchris
Awwww.... NOW what?!
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#28
Quote by toaster_poodle
Another thing to think about is that the music industry consists of a lot more than the actual performers. There are tons of specialized schools that offer Associate's degrees in audio production/recording and stuff like that, maybe kind of a "safer" way to still do what you love.



Terrible idea. You'll be out there looking for work, and competing with experienced engineers for the precious few jobs out there that actually open up. Why are there so many experienced engineers out there? Because studios are closing down all the time. It is a dying industry... big time. Most people who used to do pro studios start up their own home studios or something similar and try to eke out a living that way. The others - those who have an established clientel and a track record for drawing talent and producing great product are out there actually *getting* the jobs at large pro studios.

And if you were a studio owner, who would *you* hire - they person with the track record for success and whose name alone will draw clients into your studio in a market that is dying, or the kid fresh out of audio engineering school?

I have another post somewhere that I can find, if you're interested, all about how to get work in pro recording.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Damascus
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#29
Quote by axemanchris
You meet a girl that you like best out of all of them. (for me, it was a couple years after university, but whatevs) You finish school. Inevitably, you find yourself with a girl, a job ticket into a career, and a girl who wants to get married.... and so do you. And you have the means to make money and start enjoying things. So you take that job that you've worked hard to get.


Could read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ethical_Slut

Jus' sayin'.

Otherwise bow to your experience.

EDIT: Actually,
Quote by axemanchris
I have another post somewhere that I can find, if you're interested, all about how to get work in pro recording.

CT

I'd love to see those.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
Last edited by Damascus at Jun 10, 2009,
tagyoureit
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#31
Give up the dream, for it destroys more souls than it rewards.
Damascus
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#32
Quote by tagyoureit
Give up the dream, for it destroys more souls than it rewards.


If there's one thing I've learnt from listening to people who have achieved their dreams, it's never ever ever listen to anyone who tells you this.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
Last edited by Damascus at Jun 10, 2009,
axemanchris
Awwww.... NOW what?!
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#33
Quote by Damascus
Could read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ethical_Slut

Jus' sayin'.

Otherwise bow to your experience.

EDIT: Actually,

I'd love to see those.


Thanks, man...

Here was that post on getting into recording:

First, there are studios closing down daily because the market is just not there anymore to support many of them. Your potential number of employers is dwindling all the time, and those people who had jobs at those studios (and therefore experience) will be competing with you looking for work at the handful that are still standing.

Second, most real-world studios don't care that much if you have qualifications on paper. They look at what your track record is. What have you done? Can I hear your work? That sort of thing. Someone whose work speaks for itself without training will get the job pretty much every time over someone whose work is okay who has training.

By extension of both of those, most studios don't put out ads "wanted: studio engineer." They take advantage of their existing set of contacts and connections and fish from that pond. It is very much a business of who you know.

So.... given all that, the best way of getting a job at a major studio is:
1. Show up at their door and introduce yourself. Do this many times if necessary. Be a polite, cordial, eager and pleasant pain in the ass. You're not there for a job yet. You're volunteering to make coffee, vacuum carpets, be a gopher when someone in a band needs smokes, water plants, whatever. In return, all you ask is for the chance to watch a few sessions so you can start learning some stuff.
2. Once your foot is in the door, be the best coffee maker, carpet vacuumer, corner-store runner you can. It shows you're worth the effort for them to have you around. They'll start to like you and be more willing to let you watch. They'll even teach you the proper way to wind cables.
3. Eventually, you'll be given jobs like setting up mics and moving them around the room as the engineer tells you what to do - "closer... closer.... back it off a bit... now left... "

Little jobs at a time, and you'll be trained on site by the people who know what they are doing. It won't cost you anything but time.

As they get confidence in your knowledge, reliability, etc., there will come a time when the studio makes some concession to band where they'll give them a cut rate if they're willing to come in at 6:00am and work with one of their interns. That would be you. Maybe it will come up as one of the regular studio assistants is sick, or quits, or whatever, and you'll get called up to help out. Sure, you're last picked, but at least you're picked.

You'll start noticing that other people with genuine credentials are sending in their resumees. The studio, already with a full complement of staff, including interns, assistants, lackeys, etc. does not typically call those applicants back.

CT

PS. Just in case you're thinking that I'm one of those "anti-education.... school is no good for anything" kind of people, I have a degree in music and teach in a school... so no. I'm *very* pro-education. I'm also very practical, and that means taking the steps you *really* need to get there rather than assuming that a piece of paper will be your ticket.
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
z4twenny
UG's resident Psychopath
Join date: Nov 2005
936 IQ
#34
^ srsly, thats awesome. music is a business and thats a really good crash course on getting your foot in the door (i've read articles from several sound engineers where they said they got in the door exactly how you described, they were basically studio roadies/techs/gophers) hell, trent reznor was a janitor in a studio just so he could get free recording time in the middle of the night to complete pretty hate machine. seems to have worked out well for him.
bigcheese_1989
UG Member
Join date: May 2009
676 IQ
#35
AxeManChris, you are loaded with wisdom. Seriously, man.

You know, I've never even considered getting a job at a recording studio. It just never crossed my mind. So, when I go up there, what should be my first words? "Hi I'm interested in employment." I have no idea. Can you kinda walk me through that really quick?
SlackerBabbath
Est. 1966.
Join date: Apr 2007
264 IQ
#36
Quote by Nietsche
Brian hugh warner wrote music articles for a south florida lifestyle magazine before he donned the white makeup and became marilyn manson.

Yeah, another music journalist turned musician was Mark Manning who became Zodiac Mindwarp, he used to be the editor of 'Flexipop' magazine back in the 80s.
axemanchris
Awwww.... NOW what?!
Join date: Aug 2006
2,471 IQ
#37
Quote by bigcheese_1989
AxeManChris, you are loaded with wisdom. Seriously, man.

You know, I've never even considered getting a job at a recording studio. It just never crossed my mind. So, when I go up there, what should be my first words? "Hi I'm interested in employment." I have no idea. Can you kinda walk me through that really quick?


I considered it a while ago, just for kicks. I wasn't serious enough about it to pursue it with the vigor that I should have, if I was interested in making a career out of it. But we do have a pro studio here in Hamilton (U2, G'n'R, etc.) I could have gotten my foot in the door, though, with more perseverance.

1. Present yourself professionally. Be serious. Sure, you're only volunteering to water plants and buy smokes for people and stuff, but if you come across as a flaked-out dope-head, they don't want you near their gear, or their clients. No matter what your role, you represent the studio. No room for idiots. Start with a phone call that describes in very general terms what you're interested in. Find out who you need to speak to, and when you can come in to talk to him/her in person.

2. Be up front about what you want, and what you're willing to offer in return. Don't ask for money - just an opportunity to be around so you can pick up some knowledge. Be willing to do practically anything in return. Don't ask to mix the next client's project. Remember, at first, you're a lackey. Tell them, though not in as derogatory a way, that this is all you expect your role to be and that you're willing to do it.

3. If you actually know something about recording, get them to talk about recording. Most of those types are really interested in talking shop - at least the ones who enjoy it. The more competent they perceive you to be, the more willing they will be to share information with you. (hint... you want to get them to like you? Research what the studio has done, and even better, what that engineer has done and be able to talk about his/her work... how much you really liked such-and-such about it, etc. Also, complement them on their choices of gear, if you're equipped sufficiently to do so. You know.... "LA-2A s.... I love the sound of those" or "Hey, you're using an RE-20 on the kick there. I like them a lot better than the D12's.... they're more robust and not as clicky" or whatever.)

4. Be prepared to provide references. It's not likely they'll want a resume. It doesn't take a brain surgeon to make coffee and vacuum carpets. But they will want to know that you're reliable and that you're not going to bugger off with some client's money when he asks you to fetch him some iced tea. (or worse, lift a key and break in after hours....)

5. Expect a little bit of a run-around. "Call me back mid-week" kind of thing, and then the guy isn't around, so another studio lackey says to try back Friday around 10pm, etc. Those people are often legitimately busy, and sometimes they just want to see how committed you are to working for free.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
bigcheese_1989
UG Member
Join date: May 2009
676 IQ
#38
Okay, I will definitely look into this. I live in a small city, so it's not many recording studios around, but I'll keep looking. Thanks so much
zephyrclaw
comPOSER
Join date: Jul 2003
1,987 IQ
#39
I thought that generally, if you attend an established audio production institute, they'll help you find work when you finish your degree (if you're a good student and everything, of course).
Kenny77
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2008
237 IQ
#40
Quote by tagyoureit
Give up the dream, for it destroys more souls than it rewards.


Some people are just ****ed up to begin with. Music is my life, I can either die alone doing something I love, or die alone working at some desk job.