#1
If you have a tube amp and you want it to reach it's full potential you have to crank it pretty good, right? So, if I wanted to buy a tube amp that's too loud, would I be able to put an EQ pedal in front of it and bring the volume down on that and still get a good sound by cranking the amp?

Sorry if this is a confusing post.
#2
An EQ would work, but I would come sooner buying an Overdrive pedal first, and then buying an EQ to either put in your amp's effects loop to even further fine tune your tone, or, putting it in front of your amp and use it as a solo boost.

Using an overdrive pedal will allow you to play your amp at low volumes and still have a good tone, because the OD will push the amps tubes and tighten up your tone.
Quote by Zeppelin71
Umm. . .uh. . .your mom touched sjones' dick. YOUR MOM TOUCHED OUR GUITARISTS GENITALS IN A CAMPER AT A BIKER FESTIVAL! truth.
#3
Quote by lightningjoe88
If you have a tube amp and you want it to reach it's full potential you have to crank it pretty good, right? So, if I wanted to buy a tube amp that's too loud, would I be able to put an EQ pedal in front of it and bring the volume down on that and still get a good sound by cranking the amp?

Sorry if this is a confusing post.


No, that wouldn't work very well. You would decrease the input to the preamp tubes driving them less, and the cranking would increase the input on the power tubes driving them more. I don't think this is what you are after.

You are better off trying to fake the cranked sound with an OD to drive the preamp tubes harder, or imitate the real deal with an attenuator after the power amp before the speakers. You would still be missing out on the extra speaker movement though.

Only cranking the thing will give you the whole shabang. You get close with an attenuator, and you can half ass it with an OD. You can have the EQ in front and have it work as an OD, but lowering the volume on that and increasing it on the amp probably won't get you what you're after.
WTLTL 2011
#4
im not exactly sure why people think that turning the volume down then pushing the front end with an overdrive pedal is going to make the amp sound more driven. its the signal level in the amp that makes a difference. the way to use an overdrive pedal to push an amp is to turn the amp up, then turn on the od pedal to push the tubes harder by increasing the signal level.

the reason od pedals work nicely in front of tube amps at low volumes is that they simulate the sound of tubes being overdriven. so if you combine the dirt from that sound with the sound of tubes actually being pushed, you get a nicely overdriven sound at lower volumes. the amp is not producing all of the crunch/distortion though.

so basicly, no your idea of decreasing the level before the amp then turning the amp up will not work.
#5
I have the Boss Super Overdrive pedal, would that work out OK?
Last edited by lightningjoe88 at Jun 25, 2009,
#7
you sir need an attenuator such as a weber mass or a thd hotplate
Member of the Schecter Hellraisers
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#9
Quote by lightningjoe88
What's an attenuator?

An attenuator is the latest fad right now. Remember the Hula Hoop or Rubik's Cube or Cabbage Patch Kids? Well that is what an attenuator is -- people want them now, but in a month's time from now those people that have them will see how stupid they were for buying one.

An attenuator is a device that cripples the sound of your amp. Instead of that $1,000 you paid to get a great sounding amp, well, you can now pay $300 more and hook up an attenuator to make your $1,000 amp sound like a $150 amp.

Do the math:
$1,000 amp + $300 attenuator = $150 sounding amp.
Great deal, huh?
You can pay $1,300 to make your amp sound like a $150 amp, or you can just buy a $150 amp and save yourself $1,150.
#10
^

Obvious troll is obvious.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#11
According to Wikipedia,

"An attenuator is an electronic device that reduces the amplitude or power of a signal without appreciably distorting its waveform.

An attenuator is effectively the opposite of an amplifier, though the two work by different methods. While an amplifier provides gain, an attenuator provides loss, or gain less than 1."

It basically lowers the volume while still making your amp work as hard as if was actually cranked up very loud
Last edited by lemon_lime123 at Jun 25, 2009,