#1
Hey guys, its me, and i have a serious issue here.
I'm not gonna talk to much, just gonna tell it to you straight.
Where i want to go with music, is to play in a thrash band with some good mates of mine, and rite my own music.
But i've only been playing for 5 months, and can play these songs

Raining Blood - Not as fast as slayer, thats impossible
Dead Skin Mask - Most of Kerrys solo, but not very well
Mandatory Suicide - Jeffs Solo
Heroes End - Judas Priest
Unleash The Bastards - Municipal Waste
Terror Shark - Municipal Waste
Spirit In Black - No Solos

Here are the songs i want to learn / already know a bit of, and i want to play these solos

The Antichrist
Fight Til Death
Chemical Warfare

All Slayer

I want to know what i need to know to be able to rite and play these songs, and now to rite my own.
Please to all Shredders / Metalheads / Experienced players out there, your help will be greatly appreciated.
As of 2:30 tomorow i will be on school break for two weeks and will have all that time to practice whatever i need to.

Thank you for your time, and i hope to see some good, in depth - genuine replys from the great members from Ultimate Guitar

-Tyson
#2
There's absolutely no reason why you shouldn't learn theory. Just take it bit for bit and start out with simple things.
The theory sticky in this forum and the crusade articles are a great place to start.
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#4
Yeah, all good players know theory, its how you know what notes your allowed to use in a solo etc. Theory is just something that you gradually absorb if you pay enough interest whilst learning. Just look at the previously mentioned articles and hang out in the musician talk forum.
You haven't played for very long at all, so don't worry about knowing everything now.
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Last edited by turtlewax at Jun 25, 2009,
#5
Yes, learn theory. It's already been recommended, but i'm going to second the recommendation; Start with the crusade columns on this website.

As for the songs you are currently playing, do you use a metronome. Using a metronome is a good way to improve speed. Start slowly until you can play a part well, then increase the speed a little, repeat until you are up to the proper speed. This won't happen in a day, it'll take months, even years, but it will improve your ability to play accurately at speed.
#7
Thoery can help to make you a much better musician and will help you to understand and appreciate more music. It can also help you to play what yu are hearing in your head
#8
from the perspective of a player who does not use theory -

theory is very useful as it takes the guess work out of improvising. once you get good at it, you will know which notes you can play and sound in key with what you are doing, it can also give you ideas for different things to play and allow you to make your own chords and so on. it is very useful to any guitarist as far as im concerned.

theory can also make it easier to branch out into different styles as it emphasises different interactions with notes

however, it is not essential to learrn theory, and not as someone above commented as simple as players who learn theory will get good and people who dont will not. it just doesn't work like that. you can get just as good by just playing, but if you just play then it will take you longer to find the patterns that theory shows you because you have to work it out yourself.

i think if your thinkiing about looking into theory then it is time that you thought about learning some and seeing how it goes. i began to learn and then realized i wasn't interested - i saw its use, but i like to learn things myself. its slower, but you have to do what is good for you. not me, not anyone else who commented - you.

what i would say though is that a lot of people who learn theory, to begin with they seem to forget entirely about using their head. like people using a sat nav, it tells you where to go, but when it says turn left you wait till the turn you dont just immeadietly turn left inton a field. what i mean by this is, if you watch a lot of people new to theory, they just run the scales that they have learnt as a song, whereas the actual joy of theory is that you should almost be able to forget it - you play as you normally would, and with more ideas, you just now know where the possible notes are.
#9
based on what you said you want to achieve, i'd say it's pretty much irrelevant because it's not really necessary to play slayer or other simple stuff like that. on the other hand it's not going to hurt you to know a bit.

once i progressed from playing simple songs, i found theory was far more useful. I recommend you learn it if you want to take your playing seriously and improve as much as possible, but don't let it kill the fun of playing. remember, music is all about what it sounds like, whether you know what you're doing or not.
#10
of course. What you want to achieve there, I think you don't really need it so much, more, you need to learn techniques, like sweep picking, tapping, hammer on/pull off, vibrato, bends etc. That's just sitting with your guitar and going through it slowly until your fingers can do it, very little understanding needed. But you might want to learn theory later, especially if you sit down to write a solo and all you can do is sweep a couple of shapes you found on UG. Learn scales, learn what they sound like, what notes/intervals are in them, learn about keys, learn what note every fret is, learn about chord construction (also for constructing arppegios, for sweeping). Just learn it, when you get some hw from school just do some theory instead :P k up to you wehn you learn it just do it
#11
yer man, you should learn it
i played for a bout a year, got really good, solos and what not, but when i tried to make my own solos it sounded crap, but then i learned theory, and everything i make sounds like it should do, and not out of place

theory is the key

i learnt it in my spare time, i dont do music at college, or never done it at school


internet + ug = win for learning

btw jeff from slayer knows some deep theory and studies guitarists like yngwie and such platers

hes the main man
Last edited by 2mins2midnite at Jun 25, 2009,
#12
Nah don't bother theory is just for jazz nerds

>.>

<.<

But seriously, it's worth exploring at least a little bit of chord construction and scale odds and ends, certainly in order to communicate musically with the other musicians in your band. Make sure your ears keep up though.
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#13
yes learn theory , your ears will thank you!
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#14
dude don't study it if you don't want to. if you want to write your own stuff in that style just take an in depth look at their songs, cut and paste stuff until you get the hang of it. remember "theory" is basically putting names to stuff that sounds good or why stuff sounds the way it is.
yes i study theory, but i wouldn't recommend sitting down and studying it for the purpose of "learning theory" if it wont help you plus having a good ear is about 50 katrillion times better than having a good understanding of theory anyway

ill probably get flamed for this but peace out
Originally Posted by jmac72187
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
Ok

Thank you to everyone here who has posted.
Coming from a country where there arn't many metalheads or players in my vicinity at all makes it very hard for me to get help from people who know how to play the guitar and have a knowledge of theory, also, i can't believe how many people posted in such a short time, my thanks goes out to you.

The real question here though is, what do i need to learn to write my own stuff, what do i need to learn to be a serious metal player, and as a reply to Myshadow46_2, no i do not a metronome, i take the tab that i find on this wonderful site and teach myself the song, for hours at a time, and it usually takes me a week to get it all in.
So, in theory ( lol ), what i would like / need to know is this

How to become an accurate fast shredder
What do i need to know to write my own songs
What do i need to know to becoem a proffesional player

I come to this site with this question and this long message because i do not have anywhere else to turn to.
I know it isn't anyones responsibility to tell me this kind of thing, but i've seen people like Malmsteen,King,Romeo,Drake,Hanneman,Dime,Hammet,Mustaine,Friedman,Wylde etc
and i am so into music now and guitar that there wouldn't be any point in continuing without proper knowledge of the guitar and how songs and the theory behind the songs work.
Again, thanks to all the kind players who take the time to communicate with me.

-Sincerley - Tyson
#16
For me it works when I feel like I lack any desire to play. I say "well,might as well spend some free time studying this theory thing" and I kinda got into it but I can't say it helps to remember songs by calling them in your name "I hit C on the E than F# on the G". I just wanted to learn more about drop tuning(I'm using Drop B currently) and it was useful and I've learnt two scales and no chords at all but it is on my priority list to learn some It's useful and it gives you new ideas. But don't turn all over to the "theory side" and keep on playing what you like. I can't stand just practising or learning theory without any songs. However when I'm bored or don't wanna play anything I know I turn to theory and learn a few new tricks It's fun when you mix it with usefulness. It's dull and boring when all you do is play scales or just random chords.For the songs you said I'd advise you to just practise with the metronome ( http://www.metronomeonline.com/ ) and keep playing It should come when the time is right.
#17
Quote by ShredHead396
The real question here though is, what do i need to learn to write my own stuff, what do i need to learn to be a serious metal player, and as a reply toSo, in theory ( lol ), what i would like / need to know is this
Nothing. You can be a perfectly profficient metal player and know nothing about music theory. But that's certainly not a good route to take if you want to converse with other musicians and understand why what you write sounds good. It also serves as a brilliant starting point for writing music if your ear isn't so good yet. Start off with the major scale:
1)the intervals that make it up
2)How to harmonize it
3)Write simple chord progressions and melodies with it
Learn about intervals. What intervals sound like. Harmonic/melodic intervals. Learn the circle of fifths. Learn about keys and key signatures. Check out the stickies at the top of the MT forum page.

Quote by ShredHead396
Myshadow46_2, no i do not a metronome, i take the tab that i find on this wonderful site and teach myself the song, for hours at a time, and it usually takes me a week to get it all in.
Quote by ShredHead396
How to become an accurate fast shredder
Funnily enough you get a metronome set it to about 25 bpm and practice cleanly, slowly and with accurate technique. Check out some of freepowers vids on posture and practice.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyvGD9edWcg&feature=PlayList&p=FA239CA8EF73CEC9&index=1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNhhyrnINIU

Quote by ShredHead396
What do i need to know to write my own songs
Depends. Some know absolutely nothing. They write things using their ear. That's just one way of doing it. It's best to have a good ear to write songs but then know theory so you can explain what's going on and build off it.
Quote by Shredhead396
Again, thanks to all the kind players who take the time to communicate with me.
.
#19
I don't know anyone who is studying theory and doesn't have a good ear.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#20
Quote by blueriver
I don't know anyone who is studying theory and doesn't have a good ear.
Ever been in a GCSE music classroom?
.
#21
Quote by Nietsche
Ever been in a GCSE music classroom?


No, I have never even heard of that. Sight singing/aural training/music theory go togather was my point. People seem to say that you should focus on your ear instead of relying on theory, but I recall most of my homework and studying in school going to my sight singing class.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#22
Quote by blueriver
No, I have never even heard of that. Sight singing/aural training/music theory go togather was my point. People seem to say that you should focus on your ear instead of relying on theory, but I recall most of my homework and studying in school going to my sight singing class.
Agreed aural training is a big part of music theory. I wasn't saying he should rely on his ear and avoid theory. I was saying that some people don't learn music theory and get by on their ears alone. It just isn't a good idea if your serious about wanting to be a profesional.

And GCSE is a general certificate of secondary education. All british schoolchildren have to take them. In mine about half the class were practically tonedeaf. Some of them where confusing major intervals for minor intervals. I was like
.