#1
Tomorrow I have a listening exam in Music and one of the parts of the paper is to listen to 4 pieces of music and write down what periods they are from and why you chose that answer. The Periods of Music will be Classical, 1800-1830, 1830-1900 (Romantic) and 21st Century.

I was hoping someone could tell me some key points to look out for to determine which period the music is from. Thanks!
#2
Quote by the_hoodster
Tomorrow I have a listening exam in Music and one of the parts of the paper is to listen to 4 pieces of music and write down what periods they are from and why you chose that answer. The Periods of Music will be Classical, 1800-1830, 1830-1900 (Romantic) and 21st Century.

I was hoping someone could tell me some key points to look out for to determine which period the music is from. Thanks!


Just out of curiosity....... did your instructor already do that? If not why is there an exam on it?

In most classes, they teach the material, THEN test you on it.
shred is gaudy music
#3
Yeah he taught me it, but he is a trainee and didn't explain it very well. Plus I have forgotten.
#4
For Romantic Period, look for very smooth, legato melodies with somewhat strict voice-leading techniques. 21st Century will be easy, they're will be virtually no strict voice-leading rules used.
WHY IS EVERYONE IN THE PIT A FUCKING METALCORE KID
#5
Classical Music shouldn't be too hard either: it is almost exclusively instrumental pieces.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#7
And don't forget Chromaticism was much more popular in Romantic music compared to music from the Classical era.
#8
Listen to the brass. That's what I do. Brass instruments where quite primitive in the baroque era and only played simple accompaniments. In the romantic era they had caught up to there string counterparts and where much more prominent. And if you can't identify modern classical music you need to get your ears checked out. If you hear a harpsichord its more likely than not baroque unless they're trying to trick you. Listen to the dynamics as well. Earlier pieces of music tend to have more sudden less subtle changes of dynamic. Earlier music also has much simpler structures.
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Last edited by Nietsche at Jun 25, 2009,
#9
cool. But what can be found from the 1800 - 1830 period that makes it stand out from classical and Romantic?
#10
Quote by the_hoodster
cool. But what can be found from the 1800 - 1830 period that makes it stand out from classical and Romantic?
Doesn't really matter. I just used to rank the pieces in order of level of expression, complexity, use of brass, complexity of tonality(or lack thereof). Higher scoring pieces tend to come from later in history so if you rank the four pieces like that and the worst gets put in classica. Third place goes to 1800-1830(early romantic). Second goes to 1830-1900 and I think you get the idea. I got mostly A's in all the practice exams(still waiting on the real results) so the method works for me at least.
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#11
Classical music is characterized by the music of Mozart/Beethoven. You can expect most everything to be diatonic. The 5-1 is very very important in Classical music, and you'll hear it everywhere. As for instrumentation, the orchestra will be quite a bit smaller than the modern day orchestra. Brass parts will be sparse and not very prominent, and the sound will, as the_hoodster said, be very string heavy. You can expect a lot of oboe and flute sounds as well. I'd suggest you listen to Mozart Symphony 41, Eine Kleine Nachtumusik, and the overture to The Marriage of Figaro, as well as Beethoven's 1st Symphony. These are pretty iconic pieces of the classical era.

Romantic music will employ a greater tonal freedom, and you can expect to counter some chromaticism in your melodic lines. In addition, rather than the smooth modulations of the classical period, you'll hear the use of a "pivot note," which is a much more abrupt way of modulating. The modulations will also be less to the dominant or subdominant, and will instead be to a much greater variety of keys. The music will be deeper and more "brooding," at least on average. The orchestra will also expand, and as you go further and further into the 19th century, you'll hear a much more prominent brass sound and a thicker string sound, as the orchestra will have expanded. As Kartman said, the melodies will be very smooth and legato, and the harmonies under them will be very thick and rich. For some listening examples, check out Beethoven's 3rd, as this is considered the birth of Romantic music, as well as his 9th. Check out Brahm's 1st and 4th, and Wagner, well most anything Wagner will work, but I like Tristan und Isolde and Lohengrin.

As for "21st century" music, this runs the gamut from neo-classical music all the way to atonality and free tonality. I'm assuming your prof. won't be a jerk and throw some neo-classical or neo-romantic music at you, so we'll talk about some other stuff. Also, since the 21st century is only 9 years old, I'm wondering if maybe there wasn't some 20th century stuff thrown in. One of the central trends of the 21st century is minimalism. This is pretty simple to pick out, because minimalist music is essentially doing a lot with a little. If you hear the same melodic idea, ("riff") repeated over and over again with very little melodic or harmonic variation, or a bunch of long drones, you can bet its minimalism. Another really cool thing done by composers like Steve Reich is called "phasing" which is where two instruments start playing the same melodic material and then one moves gradually out of sync with the other, which creates a really cool effect. For minimalism, think about Steve Reich and Philip Glass. I'd recommend Reich's Octet or Violin/Piano Phase and Philip Glass, just listen to parts of Einstein on the Beach (don't do the whole thing, you'll die.)
There's also free tonality or atonality, which essentially is the theory that every possible note is equal, all 12 tones should be treated equally. This one's pretty easy as well. Expect a whole lot of dissonance, and some pretty jagged melodic ideas. Think Schoenberg here, and you can listen to pretty much anything he wrote to get an idea of it.
There was also a huge movement in French music at the dawn of the 20th century, and if you listen to Debussy or Ravel you'll get the idea. Lots of whole-tone music, very free, shimmery, floaty music. I recommend Debussy's La Mer and Ravel's Daphne et Chloe.

Aside from that, 20th/21st century music is characterized by a breaking of the harmonic rules that ruled the century previous. Therefore, you can expect lots and lots of dissonance, very jagged melodic ideas, a difficulty establishing a key, very complex rhythmic ideas, and the increased use of instrumental "effects," which are pretty much weird things you can do on instruments. Think like pick slides for the guitar, but these could be anything, like screechy sounds on strings, really agressive pizzicatos, or plucks, on string instruments, the sky is the limit. Listen to one of Bartok's string quartets, or Stravinsky's Rite of Spring for an idea.

That's a lot of information, but hopefully you can pick and choose what you need for your test tomorrow.
"I love music, it's not like math. In music, 2+2 can equal 5, if it's a pretty enough 5." -Samuel R. Hazo

"Alle menschen werden bruder- all men become brothers"
-Ludwig Van Beethoven, from his 9th Symphony.

-John
#12
Quote by jslick07
Think Schoenberg here, and you can listen to pretty much anything he wrote to get an idea of it.
I don't think so. I already got my ass handed to me by archeo avis about this. Turns out schoenberg had plenty of purely tonal works.

Quote by jslick07
There's also free tonality or atonality, which essentially is the theory that every possible note is equal, all 12 tones should be treated equally.
I was also under the impression that all serialism was atonal music but not all atonal music was serialism(I assume when you talk about all 12 tones being equal you mean the 12-tone system. If not I apologise).

To the TS - I've still got all my notes from GCSE music upstairs. I can put them up here if you want.
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#13
Quote by Nietsche

I was also under the impression that all serialism was atonal music but not all atonal music was serialism(I assume when you talk about all 12 tones being equal you mean the 12-tone system. If not I apologise).


You are completely correct, I apologize.
"I love music, it's not like math. In music, 2+2 can equal 5, if it's a pretty enough 5." -Samuel R. Hazo

"Alle menschen werden bruder- all men become brothers"
-Ludwig Van Beethoven, from his 9th Symphony.

-John
#15
If possible, and is it isn't too much trouble could you please post your notes? Also thanks Jslick07 for that rather large portion of text, I am sure it will come in great use. Thank you everyone else who has posted as well.
#16
Here's some of my notes from my 2 years of GCSE music:

Classical -
-Homophonic Texture prevalent (One melody line with accompaniment)
-Simple Diatonic Harmony
-Use of symphonies(4 movements and with an orchestra) and concertos(3 movements of a soloist accompanied by an orchestra)

Notable composers -
-Mozart
-Haydyn

Romanticism -
-More interesting harmonies and use of chromaticism
-Larger Orchestra than in the classical period
-Gradual dynamic changes
-More wind, brass and percussion

Notable Composers -
-Tchaikovsky
-Edward Grieg

20th Century -
-Experimentation
-Use of Atonality
-Some pieces lacking a defined tempo
-Use of pitched percussion(xylophones and such) and prepared instruments(ala john cage)

Notable Composers-
-Stravinsky
-Shostakovich
-John Cage

Not much I realise but it was the first load of notes I found rummaging around. I might edit this post later if I find anything else. Really this and jslick07's post is all you need to know.
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Last edited by Nietsche at Jun 25, 2009,
#18
I was also under the impression that all serialism was atonal music


You'd think so, but it's far from impossible to apply serialistic concepts tonal works or to suggest tonality with serialism. I've done it myself (though I've gradually shifted towards pure atonality as of late), and even Webern, who is notorious for his rigorous aversion to tonality and is arguably the most important pioneering figure in serialism, suggested tonality (no doubt unintentionally) in a few of his later serialistic works (his earlier work was much closer to that of Schoenberg).

There's also free tonality or atonality, which essentially is the theory that every possible note is equal, all 12 tones should be treated equally.


Free tonality (which would, in this case, probably be better described as free atonality) is not synonymous with 12-tone technique, which is a single and specific approach towards atonality, and is not "free", but is, in fact, bound by the principle that all twelve tones should be treated equally (note: Liberties can be and are frequently taken with the technique). Atonality was explored by other composers like Bartok and Scriabin without the use of 12-tone technique.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Jun 25, 2009,