#1
^ What else do you want for the title?

Hi Guys! I've looked around a lot (really wanted to save the trouble and embarassment of posting this)

Super newbie question:

How do you make a song/riff/section using a chord?

I mean how people are playing awesome crazy single note riffs
and then say its based off a G chord.

Sorry for my suckyness, but help is much appreciated! <3 UG!
#2
scales, keys, modes etc. ive got some lessons on theory in my sig, as well there are plenty right here on UG. just gotta know how to use what knowledge you have =)
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Quote by freedoms_stain
I can't imagine anything worse than shagging to Mark Knopfler.

Maybe shagging Mark Knopfler, but that's about it.
#3
Well, one way to think about it is this: Each chord is composed of several individual notes. So, take the notes of some chord, and instead of playing all of them at once, play them in a sequence. Viola, a riff is produced. And don't feel confined to chord shapes, but as a exercise, try to stay within the notes.

To use the G you mentioned as an example, a simple G chord is made up of the notes G, B, and D. So, take the various Gs, Bs, and Ds around the neck and make a riff. And it doesn't have to be simple triads, it could be any chord at all.

I'm pretty sure this is what people are talking about in the situation you're referring to.
#4
Quote by TK1
scales, keys, modes etc. ive got some lessons on theory in my sig, as well there are plenty right here on UG. just gotta know how to use what knowledge you have =)

+1
#5
Quote by Kidzelda
Well, one way to think about it is this: Each chord is composed of several individual notes. So, take the notes of some chord, and instead of playing all of them at once, play them in a sequence. Viola, a riff is produced. And don't feel confined to chord shapes, but as a exercise, try to stay within the notes.

To use the G you mentioned as an example, a simple G chord is made up of the notes G, B, and D. So, take the various Gs, Bs, and Ds around the neck and make a riff. And it doesn't have to be simple triads, it could be any chord at all.

I'm pretty sure this is what people are talking about in the situation you're referring to.



Very Helpful, Thank you a lot.
#6
What Kidzelda is talking about (playing the notes of a chord in a melodic nature) is called an arpeggio, by the way. A lot of riffs are loosely based off of arpeggios and they are used to imply a chord progression when the chords are just flat out played.
#7
basically what kidzilla said, but all your notes in the riff don't have to be in the chord, just your main notes in the riff.

and choosing more complex chords to base your riffs off of can give you more variety to work with.


to practice writing this way I'd say record yourself playing a chord progression (or put it in GP, whatever) and then make up a riff to fit that chord progression. think of it like improvising a riff instead of a solo. when you hit something that sounds good look at how it fits into the backing track.
#8
when i asked this question awhile ago i got a more in depth answer. at least i think it was the same question .

are you talking about if say, in a tab, you see a riff that has no chords in it, only single notes, and yet the bar is still labeled with a chord above it?

something like this?


Am
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
------7-8-7--------------------
5-7-8-------8-7-5~-------------


someone (demonoftheknight i think) spent like an hour teaching me how to figure out how to determine what chord a bar of notes like this makes*. if you want to know what chord progression a song is in, and its the type of song that has single note at a time riffs (like above), theres more to it then just what notes it contains. something like, the first note of a melody is most likely the root note of the first chord, then the first note of the bar of your melody (after the first one) is most likely the third of the chord (at least thats what i remember being told, something like that).

maybe youre not asking the same question though . but your question sounds pretty similair.


*im not talking about basic chord construction, the simple 1 3 5; 1 b3 5; etc thing.


here's the link to the what i asked: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1018080&highlight=finding+chord+progressions

i dont know if you need this, just if you are asking the same thing i was the answer is here for you. if not then just ignore me
Last edited by SpeedLives at Jun 28, 2009,