#1
Hey all

I want to learn the 7th chord patterns and I have been looking around online and some websites vary in what the say... so what exactly are the 7th chord patterns?

I know these, and please correct me if I'm wrong

Maj 7 - 1 3 5 7
Min 7 - 1 b3 5 7b
dominant 7 - 1 3 5 b7

and I know there is one or two more

Any clarification would be appreciated, or a link to a reputable source where I can learn more. Thanks

edit fixed min7
Last edited by Angry-Mares at Jun 26, 2009,
#2
most diminished chords have a 7th in there as well.
Last edited by yomoma21 at Jun 26, 2009,
#3
full diminished 7 - 1 b3 b5 bb7 yes, that's double flat 7
half diminished 7 - 1 b3 b5 b7 single flat 7
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#4
major/minor 7 - 1 3 5 7b
minor/major 7 - 1 3b 5 7
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#5
Quote by ajreciever14
major/minor 7 - 1 3 5 7b
minor/major 7 - 1 3b 5 7


so 1 3 5 7b is called major/minor? not dominant?
#6
Quote by Angry-Mares
so 1 3 5 7b is called major/minor? not dominant?

No he is mistaken, it is called Dominant. And 1 b3 5 7 is called min/maj7
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#7
Quote by Angry-Mares
so 1 3 5 7b is called major/minor? not dominant?


In extremely technical terms, it is called major/minor because it is a major triad with a minor seventh. But because this chord is usually used in a dominant function, it is commonly called a dominant seventh chord. Both are correct, but it is much more common to hear it called a dominant seventh chord.
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#8
Augmented seventh: 1, 3, #5, b7
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#9
Quote by MaAal_MaAan
full diminished 7 - 1 b3 b5 bb7 yes, that's double flat 7
half diminished 7 - 1 b3 b5 b7 single flat 7



i've always tought that was some sort of m7-5/add6, you learn something new everyday
#10
Quote by MaAal_MaAan
full diminished 7 - 1 b3 b5 bb7 yes, that's double flat 7
half diminished 7 - 1 b3 b5 b7 single flat 7


how would you write those?

half diminished is, for example: C dim 7, right?

what about full diminished?
#11
Quote by Angry-Mares
how would you write those?

half diminished is, for example: C dim 7, right?

what about full diminished?
No, full diminished is Cdim7. Half diminished can be written like this: Cm7b5

Or with the circle with the line through it
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#12
Quote by jslick07
In extremely technical terms, it is called major/minor because it is a major triad with a minor seventh. But because this chord is usually used in a dominant function, it is commonly called a dominant seventh chord. Both are correct, but it is much more common to hear it called a dominant seventh chord.


No its called the dominant because the fifth position in a major scale is the dominant. The chord chord built from the fifth scale(mixolydian) is naturally a dominant seventh chord.
#13
Quote by ramm_ty
No, full diminished is Cdim7. Half diminished can be written like this: Cm7b5

Or with the circle with the line through it

Cdim7 = C°7
Cm7b5 = Cø7 (I can't find the superscripted one)
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Jun 26, 2009,
#14
Quote by Angry-Mares
so 1 3 5 7b is called major/minor? not dominant?


It's actually both and it is only called Dominant 7th when it is used as the Dominant (major V chord) in the key you are playing.
#15
Let's start at the beginning

First there are your triads. These are made by stacking thirds of different kinds.
A brief rundown:
Maj 3rd + Maj 3rd = Augmented Triad (1 3 #5)
Maj 3rd + min 3rd = Major Triad (1 3 5)
min 3rd + Maj 3rd = minor Triad (1 b3 5)
min 3rd + min 3rd = diminished Triad (1 b3 b5)

From here you can then stack another major or minor third on top of the fifth of each of these basic triads to get a different type of seventh chord.

Note that we use whatever kind of fifth we have in our basic triad and add the major or minor third from there. So if we have a perfect fifth we might add a major 3rd the result will be a major 7 interval from the root. If it is a b5 in our triad and we add a major third to this we will end up with a minor 7th from the root.

So to get our various seventh chords we go through each of the four basic triads and stack a third on top.

Here are the various seventh chords built using different triads as a base:

Sevenths built from Augmented Triads

Aug Triad + Maj 3rd = Augmented Triad (a Major 3rd on top of a #5 will give a #7. Since the #7 is enharmonic with the octave of the root the result is a doubling of the root note and it's still just an augmented triad. (1 3 #5 #7 is enharmonic with 1 3 #5 8).

Aug Triad + min 3rd = Augmented Major Seventh, or Maj7#5 (1 3 #5 7)

Sevenths built from Major Triads

Major Triad + Major 3rd = Major 7th chord (1 3 5 7) - written as Cmaj7

Major Triad + min 3rd = Dominant 7 (1 3 5 b7) - written simply as C7

Sevenths built from Minor Triad

Minor Triad + Major 3rd = minor Major 7 (1 b3 5 7) - written as Cm/Maj7

Minor Triad + min 3rd = minor 7 (1 b3 5 b7) - written as Cm7

Sevenths built from Diminished Triad

Diminished Triad + Maj 3rd = half diminished 7th or minor 7 flat five (1 b3 b5 b7) - written as either CØ7 or more commonly Cm7b5

Diminished Triad + min 3rd = diminished 7th (1 b3 b5 bb7) - Cdim7 or Cᴼ7

These are the basic triads and seventh chords built from "Tertian Harmony" which means to use maj and min thirds for construction.

Other Seventh Chords
There are also some seventh chords that are altered versions of these chords. That is, one or more notes have been altered and the result is that the intervals between each note are not ALL major or minor thirds, but they are still considered seventh chords.

Dominant seventh sharp five = 1 3 #5 b7 = C7#5 - An augmented triad with a minor seventh

a diminished/major seventh = 1 b3 b5 7 = Cdim/Maj7 or Cm/Maj7b5 diminished triad with a major seventh.

Notice how the distance between the fifths and respective sevenths are the altered interval while the base triad is still one of our four basic triads.

There are also other altered chords where the base triad is altered maj/min resulting int the altered interval being that between the third and fifth e.g.

Dominant seventh flat five = 1 3 b5 b7

Major seventh flat five = 1 3 b5 7


Soooo....

That gives a total of eleven different seventh chords.

Here they are again
Seven "Tertian" Seventh Chords
1. Major seventh = 1 3 5 7
2. Dominant seventh = 1 3 5 b7
3. Minor seventh = 1 b3 5 b7
4. minor/major seventh = 1 b3 5 7
5. Half diminished seventh = 1 b3 b5 b7 (aka m7b5)
6. Fully diminished seventh = 1 b3 b5 bb7
7. Augmented Maj7 = 1 3 #5 7 (aka maj7#5)

plus Four "Altered" Seventh Chords
8. Dominant seventh sharp 5 = 1 3 #5 b7 (aka aug/min7)
9. Diminished major seventh = 1 b3 b5 7 (aka min/Maj7b5)
10. Dominant seventh flat 5 = 1 3 b5 b7
11. Major seventh flat 5 = 1 3 b5 7

I'm pretty sure that's all of them.
Hope it helps.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Jul 31, 2010,
#17
i think 20tigers got pretty far

though some more altered 7th chords
1 b9 3 b5 7
1 b9 3 #5 7
1 #9 3 b5 7
1 #9 3 #5 7
in practise most people ommit 1 or 2 of those notes, but can still get the full feel by comping through them

i think that about covers it, #11 = b5, b13 = #5 so that eliminates other alterations
#18
Quote by Funkicker
though some more altered 7th chords
1 b9 3 b5 7
1 b9 3 #5 7
1 #9 3 b5 7
1 #9 3 #5 7
in practise most people ommit 1 or 2 of those notes, but can still get the full feel by comping through them

i think that about covers it, #11 = b5, b13 = #5 so that eliminates other alterations

Few things I'd like to point out...

1. Those are altered extended chords (ninth chords in particular) not seventh chords. They all use one of the seventh chords I listed with an altered ninth extension. They aren't distinct seventh chords. If you're going to do that then you would list all the extensions not just the altered ones.

If the thread was asking for extended chords I would have given a different answer but seeing as he asked for the various seventh chords I stuck with seventh chords and I'm pretty sure I covered them all.

2. A #11 is a #11 and not a b5 for example Cmaj7#11 = 1 3 5 7 #11 notice the #11 is NOT a flat 5 - the fifth is perfect the 11th is sharped.

3. Not so important, but usually you would spell it by way of ascending numbers so C7b9 would be spelled 1 3 5 b7 b9 (regardless of voicing).

4. You could have gone for suspensions such as
C7sus2 = 1 2 5 b7 or
CMaj7sus4 = 1 4 5 7 etc
which could arguably be considered unique seventh chords just as much as the altered seventh chords from my list could. But that's arguable.

Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Jun 27, 2009,
#19
i knew that was going to be mentioned, but ive always looked at them as 7th chords,
they're also in my exams in the same group as 7th chords

as for this
2. A #11 is a #11 and not a b5 for example Cmaj7#11 = 1 3 5 7 #11 notice the #11 is NOT a flat 5 - the fifth is perfect the 11th is sharped.

maybe theoretically its not but its enharmonic so it will give the sound of the altered 5ths
unless yes the natural 5 is there

ive learned not to be the hard ass on theory i was a year ago but just keep correcting me