#1
I dunno if this a normal occurence, or if it's just me, or if there's some obvious reason which I dont know (at the risk of looking stupid) but I was wondering why there seems to be distinct change of tone when I use headphones out of the headphone jack from my amp. I'm using a Peavey Vypyr 75W combo amp, and good headphones (Audio Technica AD700 headphones).

This also happened on my crappy old practice amp, with other types of headphones aswell. I always notice a distinctly higher pitch tone.

Is it just because the amp speaker is just a lot better/different to the headphone speakers? Could it have anything to do with pre and post gains? I really dont know...sigh.
#2
I'd say its due to the fact you're using headphones. They simply sound different from an amp speaker. I generally get less low end and a tighter midrange from my headphones, so I usually try to mix with my normal speakers.

Could also be the amp, depends on the amp signal sent. If you are using a headphone out, the amp is bound to be running some sort of cabinet simulator, which would also affect your sound.
WTLTL 2011
#3
I believe the reason is that you only hear the preamp and not the entire amp sound (preamp and poweramp).

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[quote="'[BurnTheDusk"]']Boss pedals may be built like tanks but I would rather buy a cardboard box that is on my side than pay for a tank that is working against me.
#4
Well, I read on another board, that part of the issue is the distance. Apparently guitars only sound right when you're a sufficient distance away from the speaker, otherwise it sounds harsher than it should. I dont know how correct that is...but that might also be the issue.
#5
Headphones are full-range speakers, whereas a a guitar speaker is usually designed to only produce the much narrower band of mid-focused frequencies an electric guitar.
Plus you've not got the 'moving air' and factors such as speaker beam which give an amp the 3D feel. Through a really good speaker sim it'll sound very similar, but the spaker compensation built into most cheaper amps is rough, at best.

If you could hear the output from a guitar amp though a full-range speaker instead of a dedicated guitar driver, it'd sound pretty horrible; thin, screechy and sharp.
#6
Quote by kyle62
Headphones are full-range speakers, whereas a a guitar speaker is usually designed to only produce the much narrower band of mid-focused frequencies an electric guitar.
Plus you've not got the 'moving air' and factors such as speaker beam which give an amp the 3D feel. Through a really good speaker sim it'll sound very similar, but the spaker compensation built into most cheaper amps is rough, at best.

If you could hear the output from a guitar amp though a full-range speaker instead of a dedicated guitar driver, it'd sound pretty horrible; thin, screechy and sharp.


Ah, thanks, that's one of the clearer explanations i've gotten. The 'moving air' is sorta what I was referring to with the distance from the speaker. I might just try and play around with my amp settings so i can have a set of settings just to provide a warmer sound through my headphones.
#7
Using 'phones on my little Roland I eq
B 0-1
M 2-3
T 10
That gives me the same sound as
B 4-5
M 5
T 4-5
through the speaker.
Also the sound squeezer really is far too muddy through 'phones. I'd use better 'phones but my 6 yo likes to see what happens when she pulls the cable out of the volume control.
Daddy gets really angry and makes funny noises and uses bad words.
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