#1
I've been focusing a lot on learning scales recently, I even made a thread on it but that resulted in some hardcore "notes vs shapes" arguments and my question was almost entirely ignored.

Anyway, after memorising the steps between notes in the four most important scales (Major, Minor, Major Pentatonic and Minor Pentatonic) and being capable of playing on a single string and comfortably staying in the right scale - my next step was to start jumping onto other strings. I did not get much help, but eventually I figured out that to find the octave in a scale I need to jump down a string and move back five frets - and from that point continue the scale.

After playing around with that for a while, I noticed that after jumping down a string and continuing the scale on it, I'm playing the exact same positions as I was on the string above. This led me to conclude that as long as I want to stay in a scale - I just have to make sure I play the same frets - no matter what string it is on.

So this would mean that the E minor is played on the 0, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10 and 12th frets of the E string. Now, when I'm for example on the 7th fret (B) I jump down one string and move back five frets and land on the second fret of ths A string which is also (B). I can freely continue the scale from there and as luck would have it, land on every single fret that I have on the E string.

As far as I checked this works for every note on both major scales (pushed forward one fret on the B string) - but I have yet to try it with pentatonics.


Is this a valid method? Does anybody else use it when playing, and are there any pitfalls that I did not notice? I would appreciate some feedback before I begin relying on this.
#2
G to B string would be down 4 frets...other than that what u said is pretty much common knowledge
#4
No, that doesn't work. The pattern of intervals of the scale is constant and repeats, but where they appear on the neck is different on each string. If you mean counting the frets using the B on the A string as your "zero fret" then yes, it works, but you shouldn't be relying on that as it'll make your palying boring and predictable. Concentrate more on being able to know what the notes in the immediate vicininty are going to sound like relative to the one you're currently playing.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jun 26, 2009,
#5
Quote by steven seagull
No, that doesn't work. The pattern of intervals of the scale is constant and repeats, but where they appear on the neck is different on each string. If you mean counting the frets using the B on the A string as your "zero fret" then yes, it works, but you shouldn't be relying on that as it'll make your palying boring and predictable. Concentrate more on being able to know what the notes in the immediate vicininty are going to sound like relative to the one you're currently playing.
+1

Check Freepower's theory vid 1 (on his profile) for how to find your way around the neck in terms of notes and intervals.