#1
So, I've been playing 2 years now. Started out with thrash metal, branched into some rage against the machine style, and now some J-Rock. But I find im getting bored of all my improvisions.

Mainly I rip solos just in Ionian or aeolian scale. I know I don't know half the scales I should but those 2 always did me well for pretty much any song. But im bored of my licks. ive heard them all. ive even tried mising in some complicated string skipping and arpeggios. But nothing.

What do you suggest I do for a new variety?
#2
Learn Country songs/guitar playing styles.

Do it.
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#3
Quote by JacobLampman
Learn Country songs/guitar playing styles.

Do it.


Thats painful.
#4
Quote by MeritGamer
So, I've been playing 2 years now. Started out with thrash metal, branched into some rage against the machine style, and now some J-Rock. But I find im getting bored of all my improvisions.

Mainly I rip solos just in Ionian or aeolian scale. I know I don't know half the scales I should but those 2 always did me well for pretty much any song. But im bored of my licks. ive heard them all. ive even tried mising in some complicated string skipping and arpeggios. But nothing.

What do you suggest I do for a new variety?


Check out the melodic control video in Sue's signature. It's great for soloing, it really puts it into a different perspective. Also, you don't need to know anything more than major/minor, really. Just that plus some chromatics.
#5
First off, for beginners, they should only improvise with pentatonics. Major/minor scales are nice and allow more freedom, but it's really hard to hit a wrong sounding note in pentatonics. So learn 2 or 3 shapes of a pentatonic scale and be able to play 4 or so notes on the same string.

After that, learn to phrase. The best way to learn to phrase is simply to copy a singer (any genre except metal singers work). Have you ever noticed that singers would usually use 4 to 8 notes and then hold that last note? This is sort of what you should do on your guitar, think of it as singing with your guitar. This is how the blues came about, black musicians would try to play gospel and work songs on their guitars, but fail in an awesome way.

Once you've got that down, try to copy phrases you've found that sound awesome. When you're copying them, change them slightly on the second time round. You might add or subtract notes, you might start on a different note, you might finish on a different note or you might play the exact same thing except starting higher or lower and still stick to the scale (this works best when you're using major/minor scales). This is usually called developing your phrases. Each phrase of your improvised solo should have something to do with the last phrase.
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#6
Quote by demonofthenight
First off, for beginners, they should only improvise with pentatonics. Major/minor scales are nice and allow more freedom, but it's really hard to hit a wrong sounding note in pentatonics. So learn 2 or 3 shapes of a pentatonic scale and be able to play 4 or so notes on the same string.

After that, learn to phrase. The best way to learn to phrase is simply to copy a singer (any genre except metal singers work). Have you ever noticed that singers would usually use 4 to 8 notes and then hold that last note? This is sort of what you should do on your guitar, think of it as singing with your guitar. This is how the blues came about, black musicians would try to play gospel and work songs on their guitars, but fail in an awesome way.

Once you've got that down, try to copy phrases you've found that sound awesome. When you're copying them, change them slightly on the second time round. You might add or subtract notes, you might start on a different note, you might finish on a different note or you might play the exact same thing except starting higher or lower and still stick to the scale (this works best when you're using major/minor scales). This is usually called developing your phrases. Each phrase of your improvised solo should have something to do with the last phrase.


This.

also the major and minor scales with chromatics is all you would ever need.

Everything else is just those scales with subtracted and/or added notes.

so pick up whatever part and only whatever part you like from tabs and add them (and change them) to your improv.

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BTW this is not a "guitar crisis"... it's just a small road block.
*reported*... twice in one reply!


OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!
Last edited by allislost at Jun 26, 2009,