#1
Hi guys. I looked in the FAQ and couldn't find anything (I may be blind).

The only way I can describe the problem is that when I'm not touching the strings, my bass hums like a mf. It occurred to me today that it could be a grounding problem and I have been told that it's an easy fix. Does anyone know how I could do this?
It is an Ibanez sr700 if that helps

thanks
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Fuck you I'm trying to be caring and shit


Quote by Cb4rabid
Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

**** you gilly, it's not what you think
#2
It could be a grounding problem. I had the same problem but it was that I was playing with way too much gain.
#3
It is almost impossible to diagnose this from the other side of the planet particularly as we can't measure the hum.

It is a grounding problem, It may be dangerous but probably isn't. Read "this article may save your life" in the columns just in case. Get the mains sockets tested just in case. Try your guitar in other rooms to see if this clears the problem and try with another amp. It could be a break in your lead or even your kettle lead (mains lead to the amp), swap them to check.

Try turning your guitar output up to nearly full and your amp volume down lower rather than the other way round.

Some guitars are really poor in this respect and they nearly all do it to some extent.
#4
if it hums when you don't touch the strings then it's normal. think about it, when you touch the strings your grounding 'circuit' is hooked to the bridge (which is metal) that touches the metal strings that conducts into your body and your body effectively becomes the ground. when you're not touching the strings there's not much place for the ground to go is there? i know i didn't explain that the best, but it's 4 am and i replaced my blood with full throttle no carbs/

tl;dr it's normal, just deal with it

EDIT: also, consider shielding your cavities. not the ones in your mouth, but the ones that your electronics are housed in on the body of the guitar. this may help a bit.
Gear:

Epiphone Thunderbird
Custom P Bass (in the works)
Fender Rumble 100
Last edited by iamwangzilla at Jun 27, 2009,
#5
Quote by Phil Starr
It is almost impossible to diagnose this from the other side of the planet particularly as we can't measure the hum.

It is a grounding problem, It may be dangerous but probably isn't. Read "this article may save your life" in the columns just in case. Get the mains sockets tested just in case. Try your guitar in other rooms to see if this clears the problem and try with another amp. It could be a break in your lead or even your kettle lead (mains lead to the amp), swap them to check.

Try turning your guitar output up to nearly full and your amp volume down lower rather than the other way round.

Some guitars are really poor in this respect and they nearly all do it to some extent.


I read the article and will take it into consideration.
I doubt the problem is with my amp or socket because I just tried it with another bass and it didn't happen anywhere near as much (is was back around what I class to be 'normal' levels)
The problem also goes away when I have a finger on one of the strings (sometimes I have to touch 2 strings though )
Is there nothing I can do on the bass itself that might work?
Quote by UraniYum
Fuck you I'm trying to be caring and shit


Quote by Cb4rabid
Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

**** you gilly, it's not what you think
#6
Quote by iamwangzilla
if it hums when you don't touch the strings then it's normal. think about it, when you touch the strings your grounding 'circuit' is hooked to the bridge (which is metal) that touches the metal strings that conducts into your body and your body effectively becomes the ground. when you're not touching the strings there's not much place for the ground to go is there? i know i didn't explain that the best, but it's 4 am and i replaced my blood with full throttle no carbs/

tl;dr it's normal, just deal with it

EDIT: also, consider shielding your cavities. not the ones in your mouth, but the ones that your electronics are housed in on the body of the guitar. this may help a bit.


*n00b question alert*
what would I need and how would I go about this?

edit: oops sorry double post
Quote by UraniYum
Fuck you I'm trying to be caring and shit


Quote by Cb4rabid
Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

**** you gilly, it's not what you think
#7
Quote by gilly_90
*n00b question alert*
what would I need and how would I go about this?

edit: oops sorry double post



as far as shielding your cavities, just ask google, really. type in "how to apply guitar shielding" or something.

stewmac has some good (albeit lengthy) stuff here http://www.stewmac.com/FreeInfo/Electronics/Shielding/i-3789.html

i've even seen it done with aluminum foil and elmers glue and it wasn't half bad so just soak up the fundamentals and use a bit of creativity. just remember, the shielding has to be grounded in order for it to work properly. otherwise you just pretty much blinged out the inside of your guitar
Gear:

Epiphone Thunderbird
Custom P Bass (in the works)
Fender Rumble 100