#1
I was bored earlier and I thought "hey im going to make all the major scales" and as I was writing them I was stumped when I came to F# major cause it apparently has an E# in it, and if I understand correctly from my theory ive been learning there is no enharmonic notes between E-F so hows that possible?


EDIT- computer messed with title and stuff without me noticing
Quote by SkyValley
Kids keep having sex younger and younger these days. Eventually kids will be born without their virginity and their first words will be "bow chicka bow wow."
Last edited by punk_metal2007 at Jun 27, 2009,
#2
E# = F. They are enharmonic.

Edit: I'm guessing your music theory source meant there is no enharmonic note in between E and F - ie E# is not enharmonic to Fb. There is only a semitone between E and F, so E# is enharmonic to F, and Fb is enharmonic to E.
Last edited by zhilla at Jun 27, 2009,
#3
ohhh okay thank you that cleared it up for me, the thing I read, made it seem like there was nothing between E and F and that there was no E# or Fb, but thanks again this was killing me.

haha now I feel like a noob
Quote by SkyValley
Kids keep having sex younger and younger these days. Eventually kids will be born without their virginity and their first words will be "bow chicka bow wow."
#5
yup... it's one of those fairly rare instances where E# is a proper note name. most of the time, you'd call it F, but since you're in F#, there's already an F in the scale, so E# become necessary.

but yes, they are the same note. E# = F
#6
Yes, they all exist but very seldom seen. here's something interesting with C.

C = no sharps nor flats

C# = all sharps including E# and B#

Cb = all flats including Cb and Fb
Parker PDF30
Vox VT40+
#7
Quote by OldRocker
Yes, they all exist but very seldom seen. here's something interesting with C.

C = no sharps nor flats

C# = all sharps including E# and B#

Cb = all flats including Cb and Fb
C, C# and Cb major of course.
.
#8
Quote by Nietsche
C, C# and Cb major of course.


Certainly, C is C major and Cm is C minor.
Parker PDF30
Vox VT40+
#9
Music theory of relativity much?

E = Fb

/horrible joke

E#, B#, Fb, and Cb do indeed exist, it's just not common. I've used them on occasion during certain chromatic passages to save having to write a natural sign before a note. I've never had a use to use them outside of that scenario though.

There are also the elusive double-sharps:
Quote by Wikipedia
Double sharps also exist; these have the symbol "x" and raise a note by two semitones, or a whole step. Less often (in for instance microtonal music notation) one will encounter half, or three-quarter, or otherwise modified, sharps.


and quarter sharps:
Quote by Wikipedia
A quarter sharp, indicating the use of quarter tones, may be marked with various symbols including: (arabic notation)