#1
Hey,

I was wondering, say I'm in D tuning or G tuning or whatever alternate tuning, do you still use the same chords as in standard tuning or just stick with 5th chords and barres? I know some chords are harder and easier to play in certain tunings, like fifth chords in C and drop D, but what about a normal C chord in G tuning or whatever?

Thanks, this has had me puzzled all day.
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#2
Of course you can still play them, you just need to find where the notes lie on the fretboard.

Or do you mean the same shapes?
#4
why would the chords change?
the way to fret them yes, but not the notes, so pick a tuning and start figurig out some voicings you like?
be sure to start by knowing all notes if the tuning contains different intervals from standard
#5
the key here is to know the notes of your chords.
that way,you can play chords in any tuning you`d like to.
if you just learn shapes without the meaning behind them,
you`ll have a rough time playing them on alternate tunings
#6
thanks for your replies

do chords in alternate tunings sound the same as their standard tuning counterparts?
Quote by necrosis1193
Somewhere in a concert hall in Sweden, you have just caused Yngwie Malmsteen physical pain. You also caused him to catch on fire.


Quote by frusciante.ve
I like that new song of theirs that goes all "peeeeeaaaas wiiiill comeeeeee toooo meeeee"


Just because you Seymour Duncan, doesn't mean you Seymour Dunshould
#7
Quote by MacMan2001
thanks for your replies

do chords in alternate tunings sound the same as their standard tuning counterparts?

Technically they will have the same pitches, but the timbre of whatever strings you use will have an effect (for better or worse).
#8
so do any of you use normal chords in alternate tunings?
Quote by necrosis1193
Somewhere in a concert hall in Sweden, you have just caused Yngwie Malmsteen physical pain. You also caused him to catch on fire.


Quote by frusciante.ve
I like that new song of theirs that goes all "peeeeeaaaas wiiiill comeeeeee toooo meeeee"


Just because you Seymour Duncan, doesn't mean you Seymour Dunshould
#9
Quote by MacMan2001
so do any of you use normal chords in alternate tunings?

Chords and chord shapes are not the same thing. A chord is three or more NOTES chosen by the intervals between them and usually described in terms of how they relate to the major scale - nothing to do with the guitar yet, we're just talking sounds.

Chord shapes relate only to the guitar, and they're simply the places the notes of a chord appear on our instrument. If you change your tuning some or all of the notes will move, which means that all your chord shapes will no longer give you the same chords. People use normal chords all the time in alternate tunings.

A C major chord is the notes C E G, anywhere you can play those notes together you can play a C major chord.

The first one you learn on the guitar is usually this one.

e|-0- E
B|-1- C
G|-0- G 
D|-2- E
A|-3- C
E|---


If I tune down to D standard and play that shape the notes have changed so it isn't a C major chord anymore, it's Bb major...however the note C E G are still a C major chord, they're just in different places


d|-0- D
A|-1- Bb
F|-0- F 
C|-2- D
G|-3- Bb
D|---
Actually called Mark!

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#10
OK thanks for that, just one last thing I don't get is, if the chords have the same pitch in an alternate tuning as they do in standard, whats the benefit to playing them in alterntate tuning?
Quote by necrosis1193
Somewhere in a concert hall in Sweden, you have just caused Yngwie Malmsteen physical pain. You also caused him to catch on fire.


Quote by frusciante.ve
I like that new song of theirs that goes all "peeeeeaaaas wiiiill comeeeeee toooo meeeee"


Just because you Seymour Duncan, doesn't mean you Seymour Dunshould
#11
Well an alternate tuning will make fretting certain combinations of notes easier. As already mentioned, if you play a C E G then that's a C Major chord. But an alternate tuning can give you more options on how many Cs, Es and Gs there are in the chord and their pitches.

Of course if you just play the same notes in the same order then there's not much point to using an alternate tuning. But if you want to try some crazy voicing that's impossible to fret in standard, then you may need to retune.
#12
thanks all
Quote by necrosis1193
Somewhere in a concert hall in Sweden, you have just caused Yngwie Malmsteen physical pain. You also caused him to catch on fire.


Quote by frusciante.ve
I like that new song of theirs that goes all "peeeeeaaaas wiiiill comeeeeee toooo meeeee"


Just because you Seymour Duncan, doesn't mean you Seymour Dunshould
#13
alternate tunings give you the opportunity to play more... lush chords than in standard. Everyone is really used to hearing the way chords are voiced in standard tuning. So by using alternate tunings, you give a new sound to the listener. Also, they usually give you a good opportunity to use open strings more, even when playing much higher frets, which adds more depth to your chords, if you will.