#1
Hey guys, i record into Logic Pro with a Presonus Firebox. Really basic question... how high should i adjust the preamps? The bar has the green, yellow, and red.... i know about clipping and stuff like that if you max it out... but should i try to peak in the yellow zone? green zone?

basically how high should i let my level go?
My Guitars:
Gibson Les Paul Studio
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Marshall MG30DFX
#2
If you're recording in 24bit, which you should be, then there's no reason to risk going into the yellow or red. Stay in the green to avoid clipping, because you can't fix it once it's happened. You should still have a good signal, because at 24bit, the signal to noise ratio is very good.
#3
Quote by Matthias King
If you're recording in 24bit, which you should be, then there's no reason to risk going into the yellow or red. Stay in the green to avoid clipping, because you can't fix it once it's happened. You should still have a good signal, because at 24bit, the signal to noise ratio is very good.



yes, i'm recording 24bit... so the green is ok? do i need to do a lot of funky compressor/limiter tricks to get it loud enough in the mix or is the green just all good? this facinates me... lol.. i was trying to get to the top of the red before without going over the red, because i thought i needed to get as high as possible....

this might explain why my recordings haven't been great...
My Guitars:
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Epiphone AJ
Ibanez Strat Copy

Amps:
Orange Tiny Terror Head
Old beaten up Peavey cab
Marshall MG30DFX
#4
Trying to get the loudest signal possible before clipping is usually associated with 16bit recording. 16bit is still a good quality, but when you're recording all your individual tracks in 16bit, you try to maximize your signal in order to maxmize your signal to noise ratio. In 24bit, this isn't really necessary because the signal to noise ratio is so much better. So in essence, you can take it easy on the levels and still get a very good recording.

Regarding your question about compressors and limiters, they shouldn't be necessary simply to boost your signal level. Only use a compressor if it's needed to even out the performance or to achieve some desired effect. Using them only to boost your level shouldn't be needed, as you can just raise the volume slider on your track.

On a bit of a side note, another thing you can do to improve your recorded tracks is to use a mic or preamp with a high-pass. The reason this can improve your track is because, in addition to removing rumble and vibrations from your mic stand, it can also maximize the bits at your analog to digital converter. No bits will be used for the part of the signal that is not needed and would likely be high-passed in mixing anyway. That's mainly aimed at vocals though, so with guitars or some other instrument, you might not want to cut anything out at the tracking stage because you may later wish you hadn't.

And a few last tips for vocal recording, always use a pop filter, whether you're using a handheld dynamic mic or a condensor,
always use a shockmount if you're using a condensor,
always use a sturdy mic stand (no need to have your mic trashed if a crappy stand tips over and it smashes on the ground)
and always try to decouple the mic stand from the floor with carpet or some sort of padding. This will help eliminate vibrations from the mic stand being picked up by the mic.

Little things like that can help a lot and can take an otherwise solid peformance from decent to good, and sometimes even good to great.
#5
The usual consensus for digital is to get the signal as hot as possible before clipping, but that's not a good idea because certain analog elements in your interface may be still effected by the hot signal. Keep it within the green.
We're only strays.
#7
Quote by Matthias King
Trying to get the loudest signal possible before clipping is usually associated with ANALOGUE recording. 16bit is still a good quality, but when you're recording all your individual tracks in 16bit, you try to maximize your signal in order to maxmize your signal to noise ratio. In 24bit, this isn't really necessary because the signal to noise ratio is so much better. So in essence, you can take it easy on the levels and still get a very good recording.


Fixed .


Keep it nice and gentle if you want a smooth sound. Even before clipping, you get more distortion the hotter you send the signal to the convertors.

Good trick for getting the best out of a **** interface is to keep the signal fairly low.
Those fireboxes are good little interfaces though so I've heard.
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Last edited by willieturnip at Jun 28, 2009,
#8
Quote by willieturnip
Fixed .


Keep it nice and gentle if you want a smooth sound. Even before clipping, you get more distortion the hotter you send the signal to the convertors.

Good trick for getting the best out of a **** interface is to keep the signal fairly low.
Those fireboxes are good little interfaces though so I've heard.

Not really fixed. What I said applies to 16bit too. We aren't talking about analog in the first place, so that doesn't even really apply here, which is why I didn't even mention it.
#9
Quote by Matthias King
Not really fixed. What I said applies to 16bit too. We aren't talking about analog in the first place, so that doesn't even really apply here, which is why I didn't even mention it.


Well done you ****. Aren't you ****ing clever.


I know he isn't using ****ing reel to reel, but that is where it was important and where it still is.

It's just not even vaguely as important at 16 bit unless you have a signal chain made of specially designed noise generators.
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#10
Quote by willieturnip
Well done you ****. Aren't you ****ing clever.


I know he isn't using ****ing reel to reel, but that is where it was important and where it still is.

It's just not even vaguely as important at 16 bit unless you have a signal chain made of specially designed noise generators.

mmmkay. Since you like to argue and stir **** and you feel compelled to interject, I'll just say you're right and move on and let the devil's advocate have the thread all to himself.
#11
Quote by Matthias King
mmmkay. Since you like to argue and stir **** and you feel compelled to interject, I'll just say you're right and move on and let the devil's advocate have the thread all to himself.


Oh **** off you smart arse.
Epiphone Elitist SG (Serious)
Tokai Silver Star
Epiphone Dot
Epiphone Les Paul
Washburn J28SCEDL
Washburn J12S

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JCM600 (Yes a 600..)