#1
Sorry if this is the wrong forum because I'm not sure where to put it.

How are you supposed to know if a riff you wrote has already been used? I'm coming up with some riffs, but I have a feeling they have been used before. It just seems like with all the music in the world, there's very little room for new riffs left. Is there any way to ensure that you're writing something original and not just subconsciously copying something?

Thanks for any help!
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#2
If you know it from somewhere else, it's copied. If you don't but it's already been used, then you're copying but you don't know it.


How did this not come to mind?
#3
you buy every song ever, and memorize the riffs from all of them
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#5
Play it, and unless you intentionally copied it, or the artist who used it first is a dick, s'all good.
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#6
Dont worry about it unless your band's name is Coldplay
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#7
All anyone's ever done is copying something else. That's how humans grow. Copying and putting our own spin on what we see others do. We pick up words of languages spoken around us, figure out their meaning, and pick which ones to use to make a sentence. Similarly we study the sound and theory of the guitar from other guitarists in every way from being taught by that shop guy who's old band released an EP on Atlantic Records and opened for Pink Floyd to watching and analyzing people like Joe Satriani and Paul Gilbert, figuring out notes, then picking what notes to play where depending on what we like.

Everything humans do is plagiarism, from music to language even to architecture(Compare Washington, D.C. to Roman structures), so frankly I'm honoured if and when someone decides to plagiarize me. That being said though, we're all influenced by something, there's bound to be people influenced by the same things, and there's bound to be similar riffs. Look at American Woman and Whole Lotta Love. Nearly the same riff. Both excellent songs. Sure occasionally a lawsuit happens(We're still waiting for the results of Coldplay-Satriani), but frankly I see nothing wrong with building off someone else's riffs.
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#8
There's no way of knowing. Do your best to be original based on what you know, that's all you can do. Think of it like this, if you have a riff that sounds like a song you've heard of, imagine how many ooooooother songs there are that must like that. The answer is: a ton.
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#9
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
If you know it from somewhere else, it's copied. If you don't but it's already been used, then you're copying but you don't know it.


How did this not come to mind?


I'm not saying I've heard the riff before, I'm just saying that I have a kind of nagging feeling that maybe I heard it somewhere, but I'm not sure.
Chinese Democracy is a great album, people need to get over Slash.

Proud fan of Pop, Rap, Rock, and Metal.
#10
Quote by ~Shred Hero~
Dont worry about it unless your band's name is Coldplay


LOL
#11
if something u came up with sounds familiar it's probably copied
Originally Posted by TeenBite
Pfft, you all with your big shredding solos. I just play pinch harmonics, then play the same note again without a pinch harmonic. Everyone is like "teh fook?!".
#12
Quote by necrosis1193
All anyone's ever done is copying something else. That's how humans grow. Copying and putting our own spin on what we see others do. We pick up words of languages spoken around us, figure out their meaning, and pick which ones to use to make a sentence. Similarly we study the sound and theory of the guitar from other guitarists in every way from being taught by that shop guy who's old band released an EP on Atlantic Records and opened for Pink Floyd to watching and analyzing people like Joe Satriani and Paul Gilbert, figuring out notes, then picking what notes to play where depending on what we like.

Everything humans do is plagiarism, from music to language even to architecture(Compare Washington, D.C. to Roman structures), so frankly I'm honoured if and when someone decides to plagiarize me. That being said though, we're all influenced by something, there's bound to be people influenced by the same things, and there's bound to be similar riffs. Look at American Woman and Whole Lotta Love. Nearly the same riff. Both excellent songs. Sure occasionally a lawsuit happens(We're still waiting for the results of Coldplay-Satriani), but frankly I see nothing wrong with building off someone else's riffs.



There's kind of a big difference between utilizing a form of architecture or a technological development and copyright infringement....
#13
Well it's probably because every riff ever has been played by John Petrucci. You're safe. He's a cool guy and won't sue you for it.
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#14
Quote by mamosa
There's kind of a big difference between utilizing a form of architecture or a technological development and copyright infringement....


It's the same idea, isn't it? The TS says he thinks he's doing something original, so he's not intending plagiarism. Say he unintentionally copied a Doors lick. Any Doors fan or someone with a Doors CD would see that, but otherwise it looks clean. He was just writing what he was inspired to. Similarly the aforementioned architect didn't build with plagiarism in mind, he was inspired by the ancient roman architecture in his designs, just like the hypothetical musical plagiarist was just inspired by The Doors.
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#15
^ yeah, but with architecture and technological it is intentional. They see the style and emulate it. No architect thinks they come up with something new by emulation neo-classical styles.
#16
Quote by mamosa
^ yeah, but with architecture and technological it is intentional. They see the style and emulate it. No architect thinks they come up with something new by emulation neo-classical styles.


Isn't that how we all started though? Emulating(Or trying to) our favourite guitarists? Playing what they played, listening to both them and what they listened to?
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#17
Quote by necrosis1193
Isn't that how we all started though? Emulating(Or trying to) our favourite guitarists? Playing what they played, listening to both them and what they listened to?



...not me. I played my favorite songs, but when it came time to writing my own, tried to incorporate every part of music that I liked, kind of a fusion.
#18
most major recording artist (except some tribute band called coldplay) will have researchers that will identify whether a song is infringing on anyone elses before a song is released, granted there`s loads of songs with the same progressions but it`s what ryhtmic feel and how you articulate the notes involved that will make your song different. sometimes i`ll learn a song or phrase by one artist and completely strip it down reorganize parts of it and come up with something completely different with my own articulation and even the use of thing like wah,delay and octave will give a familiar passage a different feel.
Last edited by ibanezgod1973 at Jun 27, 2009,
#19
Quote by mamosa
...not me. I played my favorite songs, but when it came time to writing my own, tried to incorporate every part of music that I liked, kind of a fusion.


Exactly. You drew upon what you liked. Occasionally you like something too much to deviate it and it remains the same. Technical Difficulties by Racer X. Listen to the part of it that we can probably agree is the solo of that instrumental and you can hear a rhythm nearly the same as the second solo on Comfortably Numb. We take things and alter them to make them our own. Occasionally we alter less, occasionally more.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 4-5
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 92-54
#20
Quote by necrosis1193
Exactly. You drew upon what you liked. Occasionally you like something too much to deviate it and it remains the same. Technical Difficulties by Racer X. Listen to the part of it that we can probably agree is the solo of that instrumental and you can hear a rhythm nearly the same as the second solo on Comfortably Numb. We take things and alter them to make them our own. Occasionally we alter less, occasionally more.



Which part is the solo?

And the songs I have written don't sound like any of my favorite bands. It sounds like all of them. (if that makes any sense)