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#1
This isn't an only thread, but there's far far too little rhythm guitar being discussed here.

I'm having problems with this riff (attached GP4).

Technically I'm ok, it's memorization really kicking me in the teeth here as I just can't get a handle on the syncopation. Any halp on spotting a simple repeating pattern?

Lets get a rhythm guitar ball rolling here, it does take up 9/10 of the songs we play.
Attachments:
neurotica problem riff.zip
#2
Good idea! All those strangely-placed dotted notes and rests makes me confused XD

I have problems with playing 4-note-pattern licks that are in a triplet-y rhythm feel. I made a thread about it in the Musician Forum, and it never really got answered. Probably because I'm having a hard time explaining it
#3
I'm probably stating the obvious....

The first 13 notes in the riff are repeated. I went and got my guitar and memorized the first 6. Then added the next 3, then the next. Once you have the first 13 notes then repeat.
#4
Actually, funny thing is with Meshuggah is I can generally feel the odd time pulse, but that was just for me so I didn't "get" it and I didn't come up with anything as simple as that when I tried to break it down (forest/tree vision ) so that has actually helped indeedly. Might be posting a cover vid soonish then guys!
#5
I'd break that down into two sections.

The first is the first six notes (Ends on the second octave). The second is the next 7 notes (ends with the 4th octave). For me I started to feel it after seeing kind of as those two sections repeating one after the other as opposed to a 13 note section being repeated.

Here's a cool syncopated riff courtesy of Shane Gibson.
Attachments:
Riff.gp4.zip
Last edited by TheShred201 at Nov 15, 2008,
#8
I find that riff really dull, probably due to my love of quints and reverse gallops... Just sounds like two things I've heard before together.
#11
Quote by Guitar Guy21
Am I odd if I like rhythm guitar more than lead?


To be honest it's probably healthy, as FP said in the OP it's like 9/10ths of what we play
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#12
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
To be honest it's probably healthy, as FP said in the OP it's like 9/10ths of what we play

For some people. I know some people who play lead 100% of the time.
#14
Quote by Guitar Guy21
For some people. I know some people who play lead 100% of the time.


Like who?
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#15
I know guys that can play Yngwie but can't play All The Small Things in time. *facepalm*
#17
Quote by fixationdarknes
^ Then more than likely they cannot play Yngwie songs in time either, using speed to cover up their lack of timing and control.


This isn't just likely, it's an absolute certainty.
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Album.
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#20
I prefer playing rhythm parts that are as hard as playing lead. Between The Buried and Me and Protest The Hero have plenty (along with Meshuggah)
#21
I love rhythm. It's really rare that I'll hear a lead that does as much for me as a rhythm or riff that just crushes people. Sometimes, I'll get a bit too into lead playing for a while, and I'll throw some Rob Zombie into the CD player, little/no lead, just fairly simple, but totally awesome rhythm, and be totally reminded that this is what it's all about.

Anyway, that's a pretty tricky number that FP posted. Is the problem that you can play it, but haven't had that moment where you just "get" the feel of it? If so, I can see it being hard to find it for something that rhythmically awkward. The way I would approach it is to write the whole thing out in 8th notes instead of 16ths. Practice that and get really comfortable with it. Then go back to 16ths and eventually it clicks - you're approaching it more from a position of strength that way (due to all the work in 8th note land). If it's purely a memorization thing, this will help with that too. The way I see it, there are two aspects of difficulty - 1) Playing it, 2) remembering it. So by switching to the 8th notes version for a while, you lose 1) and can concentrate more on 2). Good luck with it man. That is a bastard piece of rhythm.
#24
Oh man, I play in a thrash metal band, which is obviously mostly downpicking really. There's a few songs we do that are almost just impossible, like faster than MoP. And when I have to play the whole set like that with few songs for breaks, AND SING AT THE SAME TIME, it's just murder. I actually find the solos to be much easier.
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#25
This is a sweet thread. I have been lacking in my rhythm playing due to only focusing on lead. Anyone have any sweet jazz chord progressions?
#27
It's nice to see a rhythm thread, I really hope it doesn't die.

My favorite rhythm riffs at the moment is the Wake Up Dead riffs (at :48 and 1:01).

As for guitarists that prefer rhythm to lead playing check out eric Peterson of Testament and his guitar world column.
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#28
Quote by Doc Smiley
This is a sweet thread. I have been lacking in my rhythm playing due to only focusing on lead. Anyone have any sweet jazz chord progressions?


I'm in a very similar position. There's a good lesson on jazz in the lessons section... I don't remember which one it was, but possibly this one. I just know that after reading a lesson or two in there, I came up with some pretty cool jazzy-sounding progressions.. (unfortunately they haven't gone anywhere yet, but there's always hope!)

Personally, I'm looking for rhythm guitar lessons or suggested artists to help develop my skills in this area. I'd like to be able to kind of "fill up" any empty space in a song by using interesting rhythm guitar playing (as opposed to just straight power or even barre chords), so if anyone has any cool ideas for that, please share! In another thread I started, Keith Richards was suggested as a good listen... which I already "knew", I just handed really thought of it. (I'm into more into learning classic rock/alt rock/blues/jazz than metal, although I do likes me some Dream Theater, Metallica, etc. here and there)
#29
I realized today that there really isn't a thread for rhythm guitarists. Seeing as how i was born with the ability to play fast and heavy but, without the ability to play a guitar solo.

So IMO there needs to be a thread for rhythm guitarists to discuss their techniques to getting chunky lows and solid rhythm lines.
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#30
Indeed
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#32
There's no such thing as being born to be a rhythm guitar player. If you want to play rhythm, fine. But if you are only playing rhythm because you can't solo, then you are lazy and have a lot to learn about playing guitar.

It was the only task I would undertake...

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#33
Well I play rhythm in a band and was just trying to suggest that us rhythm guitarists who are playing rhythm and cant really back out of it without leaving their band have a thread to discuss the techniques used in rhythm guitar.
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#34
i am mainly a bassist but I also play guitar and i usually play the rhythm guitar part in songs not because i cant play the lead but because i feel im better at the rhythm parts. Anyway, this is a great idea for a thread.
#35
Quote by MetalGS3SE
There's no such thing as being born to be a rhythm guitar player. If you want to play rhythm, fine. But if you are only playing rhythm because you can't solo, then you are lazy and have a lot to learn about playing guitar.


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#36
I like this...hope it turns into something other than a pissing match about not playing lead guitar.
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#37
I like finding the pocket in the groove and creating little melodies to connect the different chords in the progression.

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#38
My favorite part about rhythm is playing those really cool solo rhythms that people hear and remeber even though theres a lead guitarist playing over it, such as free bird and simple man. Skynyrd's pretty good at it
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#39
Quote by Seryaph
I like finding the pocket in the groove and creating little melodies to connect the different chords in the progression.

Soul Stylin'


Definately. i love using six string ghost notes in between chords and just scraping the strings so you can hear it even when the lead is playng.
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Last edited by mr gOiD at Jun 28, 2009,
#40
Quote by MetalGS3SE
There's no such thing as being born to be a rhythm guitar player. If you want to play rhythm, fine. But if you are only playing rhythm because you can't solo, then you are lazy and have a lot to learn about playing guitar.


I Think James Hetfield might have been a born rhythm Guitarist. His rhythm is that good.
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