#1
Ok I'm very confused with lesson 2- intervals. I understand what they are, the difference between 2 notes, but I don't get that interval ear trainer at all. Any help?
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#2
just listen to the two notes and try to choose the right interval they are (how far they are)
#3
Took me a while to get it, too. Takes even longer to get it completely nailed.

It's the distance between the notes. For example... Perfect Fifth. The lesson doesn't directly say this, but a perfect fifth interval is seven notes from the first note. In the lesson, the example was from A to E. If the A was an A#, the perfect fifth would be an F. Use your instrument (Whether it's a guitar, or keyboard) and play the first note, and then the perfect fifth. Do this a few times, but find the perfect fifth with another note. You should notice that even with different notes, there is a similarity between the two - that's the perfect fifth interval.

This applies to the other intervals. With the example of the perfect fifth interval, the Ear Trainer will test you on that similarity mentioned earlier - if it has the Perfect Fifth "sound", then it is a perfect fifth (so you would choose that). For example, the first two notes to the Star Wars theme is a Perfect Fifth.

Hope I explained it well enough. The trouble is getting what each interval sounds like. (The next lesson reviews the whole 'intervals' thing, if you had trouble with it before).
#4
If you understand what intervals are how do you not get the ear trainer?

It plays an interval and you have to figure out which one it is.

Did you have your sound muted or something?
#6
Quote by Shoj_
Took me a while to get it, too. Takes even longer to get it completely nailed.

It's the distance between the notes. For example... Perfect Fifth. The lesson doesn't directly say this, but a perfect fifth interval is seven notes from the first note. In the lesson, the example was from A to E. If the A was an A#, the perfect fifth would be an F. Use your instrument (Whether it's a guitar, or keyboard) and play the first note, and then the perfect fifth. Do this a few times, but find the perfect fifth with another note. You should notice that even with different notes, there is a similarity between the two - that's the perfect fifth interval.

This applies to the other intervals. With the example of the perfect fifth interval, the Ear Trainer will test you on that similarity mentioned earlier - if it has the Perfect Fifth "sound", then it is a perfect fifth (so you would choose that). For example, the first two notes to the Star Wars theme is a Perfect Fifth.

Hope I explained it well enough. The trouble is getting what each interval sounds like. (The next lesson reviews the whole 'intervals' thing, if you had trouble with it before).

No, a perfect fifth from A# is E#. An F would be a diminished 6th.
#7
Quote by JakdOnCrack
No, a perfect fifth from A# is E#. An F would be a diminished 6th.

I was about to say E#, but on an instrument that would be an F.
#8
Quote by Shoj_
I was about to say E#, but on an instrument that would be an F.


??
It'd be an E#!
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#9
Quote by victoryaloy
??
It'd be an E#!

The note on the fretboard of a guitar that is E#, is enharmonic to F, and is usually just called "F".

Same goes for the keyboard.

What? I know they're different notes, but I'm simplifying it.
Last edited by Shoj_ at Jun 28, 2009,
#10
Quote by Shoj_
The note on the fretboard of a guitar that is E#, is enharmonic to F, and is usually just called "F".

Same goes for the keyboard.

What? I know they're different notes, but I'm simplifying it.


It's an E#. Functionally, an E# is the correct way to name it, even though they're enharmonic. A# to E# is a perfect fifth. Bb to F is a perfect fifth. A# to F is a diminished 6th. Bb to E# is a... i'm not sure how to name that, actually. A double augmented fourth, maybe? Anyways, all the same notes, but they have specific names because of the relationships between the note names and the scale steps.
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Jun 28, 2009,