#1
Hi!

For about 8 months or so i started playing guitar on a 150$. I'm starting to feel its limitations in terms of tone and playability and i would really like to upgrade. 90% of my playing is fingerstyle so i'd like to buy a fingerstyle focused guitar. My budget would be up to 500$. I dont care about electronics or any fancy stuff. Just want to get a straight dreadnought with the best quality within this price.

What would be your recommendations?
#2
Usually dreadnoughts are not used for fingerstyle

Some people does, but most people would go for a jumbo shape.
#4
Noooo, Jumbo is not good for fingerstyle, Many people use 000/auditorium size guitar. I'd highly recommend trying out Martin 000x1, has HPL back and sides but sounds beautiful, i have one, or a used Epiphone Masterbilt,

you could also use parlor sized guitars which makes fingerpickign very easy.. Art and Luthier AMI, Seagull Grand Coastline, Takamine G406s.. Republic PR-1
#5
Depending on what type of playing you're looking for. I use a nylon guitar and I personally think those are best for fingerstyle because of the wider space between the strings. They also give you a good mellow tone or you could play closer to the bridge for a more solid sound. But like I said, it depends on what you play. If you're gonna be fingerpicking fast scales, I'd recommend a nylon guitar. If you're gonna play more simple songs, dust in the wind, yes, stick to steel string.
#7
Quote by ILLcoyote
If you're gonna be fingerpicking fast scales, I'd recommend a nylon guitar.


Care to elaborate on the reasons?
This space foreclosed, due to the ailing economy.
#8
For those of you saying certain styles are not "used in fingerstyle", please be aware that it's all personal preference and no body style sounds "better" than others for fingerstyle.


For example, John Butler plays dreadnoughts (and 12-string at that), and, well:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VAkOhXIsI0

Also, Erik Mongrain plays some of the biggest jumbos I've ever seen - one I've seen him play is a Rainsong jumbo, and the other is his custom Kingslight "super jumbo", which he can be seen using in this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezRiiVpSmKc


As you can hear, having a different body style can't affect the sound negatively or positively for a certain style of playing - all it does is define YOUR sound to YOUR preference. And trust me, Erik and John are far from alone. Go with whatever body style you want, just be prepared to get used to its specific sound. I currently play a dreadnought, but eventually I want to upgrade to something like THIS.


If you want an inexpensive dreadnought, I've heard great things about the Seagull Original S6.
Last edited by i_don't_know at Jun 29, 2009,
#9
The best guitar for fingerstyle is the one most comfortable to you, pal
There are many cheap guitars that sound great, but they need to be playable
I'd recommend Höfner Guitars though
Quote by allislost
then i take back what i said and i award you with 10 points! use them wisely...


Enchance your Soling

Quote by funkyducky

desadaphas get's a nod from me
for he knows that tea pwns coffee


My first lyric in Englich
Last edited by desadaphas at Jun 29, 2009,
#10
I'd go check out some Seagulls. They have a wider nut than most acoustics, which is perfect for fingerstyle. I would also check out Epiphone Masterbilts. They're also pretty comfortable to fingerpick on.

By the way, the correct way to indicate dollar amounts is the symbol before the numbers, not numbers before the symbol. $500, not 500$.
Quote by necrosis1193
As usual Natrone's mouth spouts general win.

Quote by Silverstein14
man, Natrone you're some kind of ninja I swear


Quote by gregs1020
plexi


i realize the longshot that is. little giant to humongous one.


Rest In Peace Stevie Ray
#11
Quote by Rallymonkey
Usually dreadnoughts are not used for fingerstyle

Some people does, but most people would go for a jumbo shape.


Quote by Anathetic
Noooo, Jumbo is not good for fingerstyle, Many people use 000/auditorium size guitar. I'd highly recommend trying out Martin 000x1, has HPL back and sides but sounds beautiful, i have one, or a used Epiphone Masterbilt,

you could also use parlor sized guitars which makes fingerpickign very easy.. Art and Luthier AMI, Seagull Grand Coastline, Takamine G406s.. Republic PR-1


That's definitely not true. Dreadnoughts and jumbos are just fine for fingerstyle. Basically any guitar model and shape is fine as long as it's more towards what kind of tone and sound you're looking for. Of course it is a bit more uncommon for people to get jumbos for their first acoustic guitar, but if that's the type of sound you're looking for then go ahead.

Quote by Natrone
I'd go check out some Seagulls. They have a wider nut than most acoustics, which is perfect for fingerstyle. I would also check out Epiphone Masterbilts. They're also pretty comfortable to fingerpick on.

By the way, the correct way to indicate dollar amounts is the symbol before the numbers, not numbers before the symbol. $500, not 500$.

I would definitely listen to Natrone. Believe it or not I made a topic very similar to yours when I was looking for a steel-string acoustic guitar for fingerpicking and Natrone gave some very good advice. You can look it up! Anyway, I too recommend the Seagulls and Epiphone Masterbilts in your price range. They're definitely well worth the money when compared to the Taylors and Martins in your range.
#12
Quote by Free to Guitar
Care to elaborate on the reasons?


Well, my main reason is that the neck is a bit wider, allowing easier movement on the i-m fingers (i'm referring to the picado). Also, depending on your experience with a steel string, your fingers might get 'hooked' onto the string at times and this could be bad. Or well... I play with my nails and usually when i go for a long solo/scale on steel strings, the strings are so close to each other they make it more difficult and sometimes it feels like I get that 'hooking' action in there. But then again, I don't have much practice with songs like the flight of the bumblebee on a steel string without a pick.

Butler and Erik definately know what their doing. But the thing is that (based on those 2 videos and others I looked up) I'm not sure if either of them play a LONG scale very quickly with only their alternating i-m fingers or maybe even i-m-a (index-middle-ring). Since they don't do this, they would have no problem playing everything else on the steel string.

But that's just the cheap things I know, I may be wrong. There may be a crazy-mother-f***er who can play the flight of the bumblebee on a steel string with no pick. I just haven't seen that yet =P.

I'd go check out some Seagulls. They have a wider nut than most acoustics, which is perfect for fingerstyle.

I'm not sure what Seagulls guitars are (not too good with brands, etc.) but he said they have wider a nut which is 'perfect for fingerstyle'. That kinda supports my theory of a wider nut/neck making it easier for using your fingers instead of a pick.

In the end, it all comes down to taste, if you want a steel string, go for it! It's your path =] Just get a seagull =P
Last edited by ILLcoyote at Jun 29, 2009,
#13
personal opinion definitely comes into it - jumbos are my favorite fingerstyle guitars.

if you're okay with a wider neck, seagull original s6's are good. they are quieter than some guitars but have a very nice tone. my husband says they're like baseball bats, but he plays a lot of electric guitars with speed necks. if you want a louder guitar with a narrower neck and a very nice sound, try a yamaha fg730s. if you like sparkle and don't mind a very frills-free guitar, you might try a taylor big baby. one other suggestion - blueridge. good price, very full sound that i find perfect for strumming and fingerpicking. all of these can be had for $500 or under and have solid tops, btw.
#14
Quote by ILLcoyote
*long post*


It doesn't matter whether or not he'll be able to play Flight of the Bumblebee. Steel string guitars and classical guitars each have a COMPLETELY different sound, as well as a different feel. He obviously wants the sound and feel of a steel string, otherwise he'd be asking about a classical.

They're practically different instruments altogether, in my opinion. Maybe not as far apart as acoustic (in general) and electric, but still very far apart.


Also, I'm sure Tommy Emmanuel could probably get some fast grooves going with the i-m or i-m-a fingers if he wanted to. In his arrangement of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow", even though most of it is slow, there are a few very quick passages that are played clean enough that I have no doubt in my mind he could probably keep going at that speed for quite a while. Here's a video of it:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZNJf-h7F8s
Last edited by i_don't_know at Jun 29, 2009,
#15
Quote by i_don't_know
It doesn't matter whether or not he'll be able to play Flight of the Bumblebee. Steel string guitars and classical guitars each have a COMPLETELY different sound, as well as a different feel. He obviously wants the sound and feel of a steel string, otherwise he'd be asking about a classical.

They're practically different instruments altogether, in my opinion. Maybe not as far apart as acoustic (in general) and electric, but still very far apart.


You guys asked me to backup my reason why I suggested it... wtf are you talking about then? Your name says it, you DON'T know lol That Tommy Emmanuel guy might be able to play very quick solos with just with fingers for a while, maybe, we wouldn't know for sure, but either way all I'm saying is that it's a more tricky on a steel string. And there was only 1 fast part in that whole song btw, for 2 seconds =P

I know they have a different sound but I don't know what someone is looking for when they say fingerpicking/fingerstyle or what his personal choice is. And heck yea they have a total different feel =P He clearly already told me he wants a steel string so there's nothing more for me to say.
Last edited by ILLcoyote at Jun 30, 2009,
#16
Yes, i've tried nylon and although it has its virtues, it is just not my cup of tea. I just like the feel and sound of the steelstring too much. Like Patticake suggested Yamaha FG 730S is already high on my list. Seagull's i listened alot on youtube but i find cedar sound not to my likeing. I like sparkling sound with depth to it. Spruced Seagull is already high priced and in that range 600-700 euro there are lots of strong contenders. Truth be told, i just love how Larrive's sound but i'm not good enough to justify spending 1200 euro for it. So i set my mark to max 500 euro.
So, regarding width at nut, what is the optimum size you guys feel to be on steelstring?
#17
Quote by ILLcoyote
You guys asked me to backup my reason why I suggested it... wtf are you talking about then? Your name says it, you DON'T know lol That Tommy Emmanuel guy might be able to play very quick solos with just with fingers for a while, maybe, we wouldn't know for sure, but either way all I'm saying is that it's a more tricky on a steel string. And there was only 1 fast part in that whole song btw, for 2 seconds =P

I know they have a different sound but I don't know what someone is looking for when they say fingerpicking/fingerstyle or what his personal choice is. And heck yea they have a total different feel =P He clearly already told me he wants a steel string so there's nothing more for me to say.

If it's one man on the planet that could play Flight of the Bumblebee on any acoustic guitar, it would be Tommy Emmanuel. You should see some of his other songs and you'll see how fast he can fingerpick.

But anyway, it's not about whether it's a steel-string or classical acoustic guitar. It's a matter of how well you can feel the guitar, what sound you're looking for, and what style of music your playing. Saying that steel-string guitars have strings too close together is a no-no. Anyone can adapt to many string varieties. Heck I played fingerstyle on an electric guitar for a very long time and got used to it. In fact, I started fingerstyle guitar on an electric since I didn't have an acoustic guitar. I've seen many professional guitarists deal with the "cramped up string problem" too like Don Ross. Saying your strings are too close together is, in my opinion, a lame excuse. Yeah my new Seagull is great for fingerstyle since it has a wider, but just because a guitar has strings closer together doesn't mean it should be an option that's immediately casted out.
Last edited by ItsTheMatthias at Jul 1, 2009,
#18
I thought we were done already? I'm not saying that. Just saying it might be easier... it just happens to be my 2 cents.

*scratches and erases long paragraph of pointless explanation*

I'm not coming up with 'excuses', it's just an opinion.... I mainly refer to playing the picado (soloing/scales) being a little easier on wider space between strings. But the guy has chosen steel so steel it is.


So the guy may not want a Segull afterall. My opinion: get the widest you could find =P (well, not sure how wide they get in steel strings.. )
Last edited by ILLcoyote at Jul 1, 2009,
#19
Thanks to all.
I've decided to save up for something in the 700-800 euro price range; i have my eye on a new Yamaha LL-16 or a used Larrivee D-03 which both have a fairly wide neck and also have the tone i like.