#1
So i know the chords that can be played in major and minor keys, but what about when you use modes?
#2
id depends on which mode you're playing... just like major and minor keys, different chords for different modes... if you know theory, and you know the mode, you should be able to figure it out
#3
Quote by SPBY
id depends on which mode you're playing... just like major and minor keys, different chords for different modes... if you know theory, and you know the mode, you should be able to figure it out


Do you derive the chords usable in a modal progression the same way you would derive them from the regular major or minor scales?
#5
I,IV,V are primary chords .
in each mode you get the following types of chords :

for C ionian =
Cmaj7,Fmaj7,G7
C dorian=
Cm7,F7,Gm7
C phyrgian=
Cm7,Fm7,Gm7b5
C Lydian=
Cmaj7,F#m7b5,Gmaj7
C mixolydian
C7,Gmaj7,Dm7
C aeolian =
Cm7,Fm7,Gm7
C locrian
Cm7b5,Fm7,Gbmaj7

II,III,VI and VII and suppporting chords ,
Imaj7 chords can oftenly be substituted for VIm7 or IIIm7
Im7 can be substituted for bIIImaj7 or bVImaj7
Im7b5 can be substituted for for bVI dominant 7th

heres an example
in C dorian

Cmin7 / / / | Gm7 / / / | F7 / / / | Ebmaj7 * / / / |

* (swapped Im7 for bIIImaj 7 )

can you rewrite this in C lydian ?
Last edited by ibanez1511 at Jun 28, 2009,
#6
If you're playing modally, chances are you aren't using many chords. The more chords you use, the more it wants to pull back to it's relative major/minor. You want to use the tonic of the mode and chords that accentuate the "modal" notes. So if you're in phrygian, you'd play your i chord and your bII, for example.
#7
well, you figure out what chords are usable the same way you do with major and minor scales

ex. in E Phrygian

E Minor
F Major
G Major
A Minor
B Half-Diminished
C Major
D Minor


basically it's the same chords from the relative major

but you need to be careful that you make it resolve to whatever mode your in and not to the relative major or minor.


The easiest Phrygian progression would be a simple Em7 to Fmaj7 vamp.
#8
Darren's article on modal chord progressions: [thread]999592[/thread]
#9
^^ thank you

I'd like to add;

Modes can be used in multiple chord context, but it requires you to have a good (objective) understanding, as well as aural understanding to "deceive" the ear in a tonal centre shift.

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