#1
If I am told to solo in the key of A can I play any scale that starts on an A? Like say they say play in the key of A. Can I do like A major, A minor pentatonic, A Ionian ect?
Thanks
#2
If the key is A major, play the A major scale. Do a search for one of the trillion other threads asking the exact same question, and read the lessons.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
The key tells you how many sharps and flats you'll be using. The scale you use will be dependent on the chord progression.

If someone tells you to solo in the key of A, and you don't know a huge amount of theory, its likely they mean use A Major, and as the major pentatonic scale is just the major scale with the 4th and 7th removed, you can use the major pentatonic over any progression you can use the major scale over.
#5
You can play anything that includes the notes denoted by the key. If you're in A major (or F# minor, the relative minor key), play the A major scale, F# minor scale, A major pentatonic, F# minor pentatonic, C# phrygian....and so on and so forth. Also, you can play some notes out of key, but as long as it sounds good. Like flatted 3rds and 5ths for blues scales and such.
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
#6
Yeah these guys are right, basically you need the A as a root note. The rest of the scale should have a certain amount of sharps/flats.
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#7
Quote by Vitor_vdp
and then you could use the relative minor of that major key


No you couldn't, you'd still be playing in _ Major.

Quote by Warheart1188
You can play anything that includes the notes denoted by the key. If you're in A major (or F# minor, the relative minor key), play the A major scale, F# minor scale, A major pentatonic, F# minor pentatonic, C# phrygian....and so on and so forth. Also, you can play some notes out of key, but as long as it sounds good. Like flatted 3rds and 5ths for blues scales and such.


Again, no you cant use F# minor, C# phrygian or any other modes. If it's in the key of A, then you are use the notes A B C# D E F# G# plus any accidentals you might want to use. Modes don't come into this.

TS use the A major scale.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jun 28, 2009,
#8
Quote by griffRG7321
No you couldn't, you'd still be playing in _ Major.




Actually you can, but you would hear the notes (they would function) as they relate to the actual key.
shred is gaudy music
#9
When someone says to play in the key of A, or any other key, they most likely mean to use the the Major scale.


Edit: You guys are probably confusing the hell out of TS... He just wanted to know what scale to use.
#10
Quote by Erick vonZipper
When someone says to play in the key of A, or any other key, they most likely mean to use the the Major scale.


Edit: You guys are probably confusing the hell out of TS... He just wanted to know what scale to use.


This is UG, you should know that winning arguments (relevant or not), is more important than helping any TS.

* this is sad but often true.


Quote by Splagl
If I am told to solo in the key of A can I play any scale that starts on an A? Like say they say play in the key of A. Can I do like A major, A minor pentatonic, A Ionian ect?
Thanks


To clear up any confusion.

You would generally solo in the key of A (meaning A Major), by using the A Major scale. You can also use ...

A Major pentatonic
A Major blues


If your like alot of guitarists, and don't have the background to understand this, and don't know the Major scale shapes you can utilize the notes/shapes of the relative minor (F# minor - F# minor pentatonic - F# minor blues).
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 28, 2009,
#11
Quote by GuitarMunky
Actually you can, but you would hear the notes (they would function) as they relate to the actual key.


In an A major progression, you use A major, F#minor doesn't come into this unless the progression modulates to F#minor.
#12
Quote by griffRG7321
In an A major progression, you use A major, F#minor doesn't come into this unless the progression modulates to F#minor.


While you are technically correct, I'm about 90% sure that he meant to use the notes from the relative minor, instead of actually soloing in the key of the relative minor. Aren't people allowed to use shorthand informal expressions?
Last edited by Erick vonZipper at Jun 28, 2009,
#13
Quote by Erick vonZipper
While you are technically correct, I'm about 90% sure that he meant to use the notes from the relative minor, instead of actually soloing in the key of the relative minor. Aren't people allowed to use shorthand informal expressions?


I understand what he meant, the notes in A major and F# minor are the same but if the progression is in A major then you use A major.

I someone says your in A major, you dont think "oh i can use A major, B dorian, etc.." because they are the same notes over a progression in A, they wont sound any different, if anything it will just confuse the TS and give wrong infomation about when to use modes and the relative minor scale.
#14
Quote by griffRG7321
I someone says your in A major, you dont think "oh i can use A major, B dorian, etc.." because they are the same notes over a progression in A, they wont sound any different, if anything it will just confuse the TS and give wrong infomation about when to use modes and the relative minor scale.


Then wouldn't it make more sense to direct a response such as that to the TS?
#15
Quote by Erick vonZipper
While you are technically correct, I'm about 90% sure that he meant to use the notes from the relative minor, instead of actually soloing in the key of the relative minor. Aren't people allowed to use shorthand informal expressions?


If that's what he meant, he would have just said "play _ major" and communicated the exact same thing. Talking about the relative minor just needlessly complicates things.

The key tells you how many sharps and flats you'll be using.


The key signature tells you that (well, not really, but generally...). All twelve notes of the chromatic scale can and frequently are used in any key.

Actually you can, but you would hear the notes (they would function) as they relate to the actual key.


You would hear them as x major because they are x major. There is no reason to describe them as the relative minor other a desire to disagree for the sake of disagreement. You seem to do that quite frequently.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Jun 28, 2009,
#16
Quote by Erick vonZipper
Then wouldn't it make more sense to direct a response such as that to the TS?


I have already stated in an earlier post to use A major, and in the same post said modes or relative minors had nothing to do with it.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jul 2, 2009,
#17
Quote by griffRG7321
In an A major progression, you use A major, F#minor doesn't come into this unless the progression modulates to F#minor.



That's not what he said. read the rest of his sentence after the comma. if you still don't understand I'll break it down for you.


Actually you can, but you would hear the notes (they would function) as they relate to the actual key.


in other words, you could think of it as playing F# minor, but you would still be playing in A major. if any other musician listened to it they would hear it and say he's playing A major, because he is. even if he doesn't realize it himself.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Jun 28, 2009,
#18
Quote by The4thHorsemen


in other words, you could think of it as playing F# minor, but you would still be playing in A major. if any other musician listened to it they would hear it and say he's playing A major, because he is. even if he doesn't realize it himself.


Why would you play in a major key while thinking of it as the relative minor? You'd just be thinking of the intervals relating to F# instead of A. Which is both pointless and confusing.
#19
Quote by griffRG7321
In an A major progression, you use A major, F#minor doesn't come into this unless the progression modulates to F#minor.


Duh

But you said you CAN'T use the relative minor, which is not true. (though I know what your trying to say)

You certainly can use the notes of the relative minor because their like.... the same notes.

taking advantage of this relationship can allow a person that doesn't yet know the Major scale (or understand the theory) to play in Major keys utilizing the familiar minor pentatonic patterns.


I understand what your trying to say, but when you just say "you can't do it", your painting an incomplete and misleading picture.

If you really want to help, take the time to explain what would happen if you use the relative minor, and why it would be more appropriate to refer to it as Major. Keep in mind, that it takes a certain amount of knowledge to understand this concept.

Quote by griffRG7321
Why would you play in a major key while thinking of it as the relative minor? You'd just be thinking of the intervals relating to F# instead of A. Which is both pointless and confusing.


It's just a way for people at a certain level to utilize something they know well (like the minor pentatonic scale shape), in a context that they would otherwise be unable to play in (like over Major progressions).

When you get to the level of thinking about intervals and keys and things like that, you will start seeing/hearing/understanding those patterns in context.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 28, 2009,
#20
Rather than letting someone think they're playing F# minor over an A major progression, why not explain the relationship between them so this doesn't have to be discussed again? They keys of A major and F# minor share the same notes: A B C# D E F# G#. After that, the similarities end. If you have a progression that goes A -> D -> E -> A, you're obviously playing in A major. You would use the notes above, correct? Using those notes will mean you're playing in A major. It doesn't matter if the first note you play is a B, or a C#, or an F#. You're still playing in the key of A major. Why? Because the progression resolves to A, making it the tonal center.

Now, if you're talking about playing an F# minor scale shape, what you're saying is misleading. Unless TS knows that the F# minor scale and the A major scale contain the same notes, telling him (or her) that you can play F# minor over an A major progression is misleading. I don't really like scale "shapes", although they are a semi-useful learning tool. But please clarify and explain yourself if that's what your talking about.

Also, if you're telling TS he (or she) can use that relative minor scale over its counterpart major scale, you're really hurting more than you're helping. Without understanding how they fit together theory-wise, you're really just giving them a shortcut that will hinder them down the road. Understanding the relationships between major and minor scales is a fundamental step in theory.
#21
Quote by timeconsumer09
Rather than letting someone think they're playing F# minor over an A major progression, why not explain the relationship between them so this doesn't have to be discussed again? They keys of A major and F# minor share the same notes: A B C# D E F# G#. After that, the similarities end. If you have a progression that goes A -> D -> E -> A, you're obviously playing in A major. You would use the notes above, correct? Using those notes will mean you're playing in A major. It doesn't matter if the first note you play is a B, or a C#, or an F#. You're still playing in the key of A major. Why? Because the progression resolves to A, making it the tonal center.

Now, if you're talking about playing an F# minor scale shape, what you're saying is misleading. Unless TS knows that the F# minor scale and the A major scale contain the same notes, telling him (or her) that you can play F# minor over an A major progression is misleading. I don't really like scale "shapes", although they are a semi-useful learning tool. But please clarify and explain yourself if that's what your talking about.

Also, if you're telling TS he (or she) can use that relative minor scale over its counterpart major scale, you're really hurting more than you're helping. Without understanding how they fit together theory-wise, you're really just giving them a shortcut that will hinder them down the road. Understanding the relationships between major and minor scales is a fundamental step in theory.


Who are you talking to?
shred is gaudy music
#22
oops. You, mostly. But really everyone. It's absurd to argue about things the TS probably doesn't understand and to not explain things you're talking about in a thread where someone's asking for help.
#23
Quote by Archeo Avis
The key signature tells you that (well, not really, but generally...). All twelve notes of the chromatic scale can and frequently are used in any key.
True. I was just trying to keep it simple. I wouldn't even have bothered posting if I'd seen your answer first

@TS - re the suggestions to use the notes/shape of the relative minor - be wary that a lot of your normal licks won't work doing this over a major progression - you'll need to resolve to the root of the major.

If you use the F#minor shape over an A major progression it won't sound finished if you end a phrase on an F#, it will want to end on an A (and yes I'm simplifying things again )
#24
Learn scales and know where the roots are. They say solo in A, but hey, why not solo F# Pentatonic (sorry if that's wrong. It's 4:00 AM. Yesterday, I was up 'till 4:30 and woke at 9:00)
#25
Quote by Bluestribute
Learn scales and know where the roots are. They say solo in A, but hey, why not solo F# Pentatonic (sorry if that's wrong. It's 4:00 AM. Yesterday, I was up 'till 4:30 and woke at 9:00)


Because the key is A major. Nothing else.
#26
FFS, that's Not what he's saying. F#m pentatonic has the same notes as A pentatonic, and several different people have established for anyone that didn't already know that F#m isn't AM.

They're saying to use the notes from F#m pentatonic, not solo in that key. It helps people to think of it as something they can better relate to.
#27
Quote by Erick vonZipper
FFS, that's Not what he's saying. F#m pentatonic has the same notes as A pentatonic, and several different people have established for anyone that didn't already know that F#m isn't AM.

They're saying to use the notes from F#m pentatonic, not solo in that key. It helps people to think of it as something they can better relate to.


Why relate to something that isn't relevant? Sure the notes are the same, but if you're using your F#minor patterns you're thinking in F# which means you're thinking of all the intervals relating to F#, which is going to sound completely different as they are actually relating to A.

Use the A major scale (A B C# D E F# G#), using other relative scales with be both confusing and impractical.
#28
Quote by timeconsumer09
It's absurd to argue about things the TS probably doesn't understand and to not explain things you're talking about in a thread where someone's asking for help.


So stop doing that.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 29, 2009,
#29
Quote by griffRG7321
Why relate to something that isn't relevant?


It's completely relevant if it allows you to grasp an unfamiliar concept. In fact, that's how the majority of people I know learned about modes.

Quote by griffRG7321
Sure the notes are the same, but if you're using your F#minor patterns you're thinking in F#


You're also playing through patterns of notes found in the Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, and Locrian scales. But that doesn't mean you're thinking that. If you know to keep the emphasis on the Aeolian third, then it doesn't matter really how you perceive it.

Quote by griffRG7321
Use the A major scale (A B C# D E F# G#), using other relative scales with be both confusing and impractical.


... It seems to not confuse the people that learn that way, and that certainly means it has a practical use.
#30
Quote by griffRG7321



Again, no you cant use F# minor, C# phrygian or any other modes. If it's in the key of A, then you are use the notes A B C# D E F# G# plus any accidentals you might want to use. Modes don't come into this.

TS use the A major scale.


You have no idea of what you're talking about, do you? You just contradicted yourself.
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
#31
if you are soloing in teh key of A, that implies the key of A major, and so this means you solo with any of the MAJOR modes.
#32
Quote by sweepbot5000
if you are soloing in teh key of A, that implies the key of A major, and so this means you solo with any of the MAJOR modes.
Oh my. Archeo is gonna just LOVE you! lol

TS, don't worry about modes. Ignore them for now and get your head around the major scale first
#33
Quote by Warheart1188
You have no idea of what you're talking about, do you? You just contradicted yourself.


State where exactly i contradicted myself.

Quote by Warheart1188
You can play anything that includes the notes denoted by the key. If you're in A major (or F# minor, the relative minor key), play the A major scale, F# minor scale, A major pentatonic, F# minor pentatonic, C# phrygian....and so on and so forth. Also, you can play some notes out of key, but as long as it sounds good. Like flatted 3rds and 5ths for blues scales and such.


It seems it is you who doesn't know what theya re talking about
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jul 2, 2009,